Tag Archives: publishing

Publishing Opportunity: Journal of New Librarianship: “New Generation of Librarianship”

The Journal of New Librarianship (http://www.newlibs.org) seeks short columns (500 to 1000 words) that explore, examine, and discuss issues surrounding the New Generation of Librarianship, wherein the “new generation” is broadly conceived to include any person who is new to the field, regardless of age, background, etc.

We invite works examining the issues faced by the new generation of librarians, across all fields of librarianship. Topics could include, but are not limited to: efforts advancing accessibility, equity, diversity, and inclusion; experiences of librarians of color; critical librarianship; international experiences and perspectives; succession planning, hiring, and retention; experiences and impact of early- and second-career librarians who have recently joined the profession. The full series of previously published column pieces can be found throughout the journal’s archives at: https://newlibs.org/index.php/jonl/issue/archive

The column series, begun in 2017, was created to provide a venue through which changes and challenges faced by new librarians can be addressed, explored, and discussed. Librarians work in an ever-changing field. They must respond to new patron needs and developing technologies, while also operating within institutions that are continuously reshaping themselves to meet unexpected demands. These changes promise considerable and exciting developments in the library profession, though they also mean that early-career librarians face new and unique challenges. Those who have only recently joined the profession—whether directly out of graduate school, or from other career paths—will encounter challenges, opportunities, and experiences unlike those of previous generations. Changing demographics and new career trajectories within librarianship itself similarly ensure that entering librarians bring unique perspectives, approaches, and skills into the profession.

Contributors interested in writing a short column should complete our submission form, providing a summary of your proposal: https://forms.gle/ZZhc3QTpi959Xax68

Full-length peer-reviewed research articles on this subject are also welcome, and can be submitted here: https://newlibs.org/index.php/jonl/author-submissions

Job Posting: Temp Archivist-Digital Assets, Sterling Publishing, Sterling NY

Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Barnes & Noble, is seeking a Art Temp Archivist, Digital Assets. We are seeking a creative, innovative, and passionate individual who is looking to make an impact within the department as well as the organization. We require excellent interpersonal and communication skills with the ability to thrive in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment.Sterling Publishing is looking for a publishing professional with experience managing a large catalog of digital assets.  The Archivist will be trained in the Sterling Archives environment but must be well-versed on working with digital files and software programs such as Adobe InDesign and Quark XPress.
Key Responsibilities:

  • Archive a large catalog of Sterling Publishing’s digital assets comprised of book interior, cover, jacket, eBook, and Kit files.
  • Collect, assess, and preserve information and file assets used for various publishing projects.
  • Ensures the accessibility and reliability of the archives as a central repository for all digital assets.
  • Follow protocols for the maintenance and retrieval of files and version control in keeping with the company’s long-term strategy for digital asset preservation.
  • Assist in creating PDFs from application files for Archives, Sales & Marketing, and other purposes.
  • Documents information pertaining to Printer files, eBooks, or the Archive file locations in Title Management (TMM).

Essential Skills:

  • Advanced proficiency in Adobe CC2015 and QuarkXpress.
  • Strong knowledge of Microsoft Office suite, Adobe Acrobat Pro and Distiller, the ability to manipulate files, and proficiency on MAC and PC platforms.
  • Must be highly organized, disciplined, and have the ability to prioritize workload.
  • Highly attentive to detail and maintaining structured data.
  • Excellent interpersonal and communication skills.
  • Experience with archiving and/or digital asset management in a print/publishing environment required.
  • Knowledge of book production processes and Title Management a plus.

More information and application: https://chp.tbe.taleo.net/chp03/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=BARNESANDNOBLE&cws=41&rid=54443

Job Posts in Canada

This isn’t a great time of year for art-librarianship jobs, but there are always ongoing opportunities in research, publishing, curation, and administration:

Curator, Historic O’Keefe Ranch, Vernon, BC

http://www.rcip-chin.gc.ca/emplois-jobs/voir-view/detailler-detail-eng.app?id=2527&p_nav_from=11&p_nav_perpage=10

The position will involve all aspects of the curatorial function at this heritage site, including accepting, documenting and accessioning artifact donations; researching, developing and installing exhibits; monitoring and recording conditions in living history exhibits, museum displays and storage areas; monitoring heritage buildings and other structures and advising on programs of conservation and restoration; researching and preparing publications, signage and interpretive information on the history of ranching in British Columbia and on the O’Keefe family occupancy of the O’Keefe Ranch (1867-1977); overseeing the heritage interpretation program at the O’Keefe Ranch; and other aspects of the care, conservation, presentation and documentation of the O’Keefe Ranch collection.

Editorial Assistant, Historica Canada, Toronto

http://workinculture.ca/The-Job-Board/jobs/Editorial-Assistant-(2)

The Editorial Assistant for The Canadian Encyclopedia will be an individual who is passionate about Historica Canada’s work, has had experience working with a team to achieve deliverables in a timely fashion and is enthusiastic about creating a legacy for all Canadians. The successful candidate is creative, driven and connected with like-minded organizations in the public, private and non-profit sectors.

The responsibilities of the Editorial Assistant include:

– Providing support to Managing Editor and Subject Editors, researching topics, anniversaries and commemorations, and gathering information.
– Coordinating the editorial calendar.
– Coordinating and reviewing all translation; assisting with minor translations.
– Coordinating copy-editing and fact-checking.
– Assisting Subject Editors in inputting changes and updates to articles.
– Running reports, under direction of Managing Editor, to create lists of articles needing update, missing translations, etc.
– Selecting, obtaining and uploading Maclean’s articles for inclusion.
– Monitoring news media and adding entries to Encyclopedia timelines.
– Other duties as assigned.

Festival Curator, Subtle Technologies, Toronto

http://workinculture.ca/The-Job-Board/jobs/Festival-Curator

(Disclosure: I volunteered for this festival last year, and they have some great workshops and presentations, including librarians discussing open-access and privacy, and other humanities-meet-science endeavours.)

The Festival Curator is responsible for implementing events that are already planned (Collide event with Continuum Contemporary Music) as well as developing a speakers’ series and other potential programming (such as workshops) within the limits of the budget, keeping to the Festival’s mission and objectives.

The Festival Curator will work with the outgoing Founding Director of Programs whenever appropriate to ensure a smooth artistic transition and continuation. In addition, the Curator will work closely with the General manager and Festival assistant who are responsible for budgeting, planning, marketing, administration and logistical coordination.

Curatorial Research Assistant, the Gardiner Museum, Toronto

http://workinculture.ca/The-Job-Board/jobs/Curatorial-Research-Assistant

The Museum seeks a part-time curatorial research assistant with strong research and writing skills to contribute to the reinstallation of the 18th  and 19th-century porcelain galleries display and to assist with research related to upcoming temporary exhibitions.

Reporting to the Chief Curator, the curatorial research assistant is a key member of the curatorial team, and works closely with the Collections Manager, the Curatorial Installations Manager.

Call for Papers: Archivaria’s 40th Anniversary issue (Association of Canadian Archivists)

Call for Papers for a 40th Anniversary Issue of Archivaria (Fall 2015)

Archivaria Anniversary Issue: To Understand Ourselves

In 1953, the Archives Section of the Canadian Historical Association was born. A decade later, Hugh Dempsey, the first editor of The Canadian Archivist, argued that “the Archives Section feels it would perform a useful service by publishing selected papers and bringing information on archival techniques, policies and practices to the attention of its members.” This “useful service” has been performed admirably ever since, by The Canadian Archivist from 1963 to 1974 and by Archivaria since 1975.

Also in 1975, the Commission on Canadian Studies published To Know Ourselves, an examination of the role and importance of Canadian studies to Canadian society and identity. As Chair Tom Symons wrote in his introduction to the Report, “the most valid and compelling argument for Canadian studies is the importance of self-knowledge, the need to know and to understand ourselves: who we are; where we are in time and space; where we have been; where we are going; what we possess; what our responsibilities are to ourselves and to others.”[1]

In 2015, Archivaria will celebrate its 40th anniversary. In honour of this milestone event, the Archivaria Editorial Board will publish a special issue of Archivaria offering reflections on the state of archives, the archival profession, and the archival discipline in Canada. Building on the perspective of the Symons Report, this issue will look at the past, present, and future of archives in Canada, the place of archives in time and space, the responsibilities of archivists – to ourselves and to others – and the nature of the archivist in the 21st century.

We are seeking contributions from Canadian and international archivists and archival scholars as well as from allied professionals, users of archives, and others with a stake in the archival endeavour. We are soliciting contributions on such topics as:

· the perception of the role, scope, and nature of archives (including holdings, institutions, and archival practitioners) from within and outside the archival profession and discipline,
· the impact of societal and technological change on the nature of archives and role and duties of archivists,
· the history, development, and role of Archivaria and its contributions to archival thinking since its inception 40 years ago,
· the future role of archival networks, associations, and alliances in supporting the archival endeavour,
· the changing relationship between archives and different sectors of society, including perspectives from contributors such as historians, social scientists, statisticians, lawyers,
genealogists, etc., and
· speculations on the future of the profession and discipline.

Deadline for expressions of interest: Expression of interest consisting of an abstract of the proposed article (300-500 words) must be received by Archivaria Editorial Board representative Laura Millar (laura_millar@telus.net<mailto:laura_millar@telus.net>) by 14 November 2014.

Submission guidelines: Final submissions should follow the “Advice to Authors of Submissions to Archivaria” at http://archivists.ca/content/advice-authors-submissions-archivaria.

Deadline for complete manuscripts: Complete manuscripts are due 30 April 2015.

Please feel free to direct questions related to this special issue to the Editorial Board representative, Laura Millar, at laura_millar@telus.net.

[1] T.H.B. Symons, To Know Ourselves: The Report of the Commission on Canadian Studies, Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, 1975, p. 12.

Call for Papers: Archivaria's 40th Anniversary issue (Association of Canadian Archivists)

Call for Papers for a 40th Anniversary Issue of Archivaria (Fall 2015)

Archivaria Anniversary Issue: To Understand Ourselves

In 1953, the Archives Section of the Canadian Historical Association was born. A decade later, Hugh Dempsey, the first editor of The Canadian Archivist, argued that “the Archives Section feels it would perform a useful service by publishing selected papers and bringing information on archival techniques, policies and practices to the attention of its members.” This “useful service” has been performed admirably ever since, by The Canadian Archivist from 1963 to 1974 and by Archivaria since 1975.

Also in 1975, the Commission on Canadian Studies published To Know Ourselves, an examination of the role and importance of Canadian studies to Canadian society and identity. As Chair Tom Symons wrote in his introduction to the Report, “the most valid and compelling argument for Canadian studies is the importance of self-knowledge, the need to know and to understand ourselves: who we are; where we are in time and space; where we have been; where we are going; what we possess; what our responsibilities are to ourselves and to others.”[1]

In 2015, Archivaria will celebrate its 40th anniversary. In honour of this milestone event, the Archivaria Editorial Board will publish a special issue of Archivaria offering reflections on the state of archives, the archival profession, and the archival discipline in Canada. Building on the perspective of the Symons Report, this issue will look at the past, present, and future of archives in Canada, the place of archives in time and space, the responsibilities of archivists – to ourselves and to others – and the nature of the archivist in the 21st century.

We are seeking contributions from Canadian and international archivists and archival scholars as well as from allied professionals, users of archives, and others with a stake in the archival endeavour. We are soliciting contributions on such topics as:

· the perception of the role, scope, and nature of archives (including holdings, institutions, and archival practitioners) from within and outside the archival profession and discipline,
· the impact of societal and technological change on the nature of archives and role and duties of archivists,
· the history, development, and role of Archivaria and its contributions to archival thinking since its inception 40 years ago,
· the future role of archival networks, associations, and alliances in supporting the archival endeavour,
· the changing relationship between archives and different sectors of society, including perspectives from contributors such as historians, social scientists, statisticians, lawyers,
genealogists, etc., and
· speculations on the future of the profession and discipline.

Deadline for expressions of interest: Expression of interest consisting of an abstract of the proposed article (300-500 words) must be received by Archivaria Editorial Board representative Laura Millar (laura_millar@telus.net<mailto:laura_millar@telus.net>) by 14 November 2014.

Submission guidelines: Final submissions should follow the “Advice to Authors of Submissions to Archivaria” at http://archivists.ca/content/advice-authors-submissions-archivaria.

Deadline for complete manuscripts: Complete manuscripts are due 30 April 2015.

Please feel free to direct questions related to this special issue to the Editorial Board representative, Laura Millar, at laura_millar@telus.net.

[1] T.H.B. Symons, To Know Ourselves: The Report of the Commission on Canadian Studies, Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, 1975, p. 12.

Student Essay Award: Pratt Severn Best Student Research Paper Award from ASIS&T

Here’s another opportunity to get published, fund a conference trip, and notch up your resume:

The Best Student Research Paper Award is organized by the Association for Information Science and Technology, and rewards a masters-level research effort that in some way involves technology. (Metadata? Cataloguing technology? Arts databases? Digitization techniques? Tumblr for institutions?) The prize includes possible publication in the society’s journal, and $500 to defray the cost of attending the annual conference.

The deadline for submission is June 15th. Your submission needs to fall under the general scope of the Journal of the Association for Science and Information Technology. The award will be presented at their annual conference, in Seattle this year, October 31st – November 4th.

Eligibility:

Any student in a Masters degree-granting institution can submit a paper. Doctoral theses are not eligible.

Papers submitted must fall into the scope of JASIST and must be endorsed by a faculty sponsor for submission to the contest.

Papers submitted should be original manuscripts (not previously published) and should not be submitted to other publications or groups while they are being considered by the Jury.

You’ll need to submit a cover letter with your personal information, the paper (without identifying information), and “no more than two letters of endorsement from faculty sponsors.”

Your work will be judged on “technical competence in information science, significance of information science findings, originality, and clarity of expression.” You’ll find the electronic submission process at the awards page.

Student Essay Award: Pratt Severn Best Student Research Paper Award from ASIS&T

Here’s another opportunity to get published, fund a conference trip, and notch up your resume:

The Best Student Research Paper Award is organized by the Association for Information Science and Technology, and rewards a masters-level research effort that in some way involves technology. (Metadata? Cataloguing technology? Arts databases? Digitization techniques? Tumblr for institutions?) The prize includes possible publication in the society’s journal, and $500 to defray the cost of attending the annual conference.

The deadline for submission is June 15th. Your submission needs to fall under the general scope of the Journal of the Association for Science and Information Technology. The award will be presented at their annual conference, in Seattle this year, October 31st – November 4th.

Eligibility:

Any student in a Masters degree-granting institution can submit a paper. Doctoral theses are not eligible.

Papers submitted must fall into the scope of JASIST and must be endorsed by a faculty sponsor for submission to the contest.

Papers submitted should be original manuscripts (not previously published) and should not be submitted to other publications or groups while they are being considered by the Jury.

You’ll need to submit a cover letter with your personal information, the paper (without identifying information), and “no more than two letters of endorsement from faculty sponsors.”

Your work will be judged on “technical competence in information science, significance of information science findings, originality, and clarity of expression.” You’ll find the electronic submission process at the awards page.

Student Essay Award: Book History Essay Prize

Book History, a yearly scholarly journal on the history of printing and publishing, gives away an annual essay award to graduate students writing about books. It’s composed of a $400 cash prize and publication in the journal.

http://www.sharpweb.org/book-history-essay-prize/

“The deadline for submission for each editorial year is 31 August. Please contact either Ezra Greenspan or Jonathan Rose for more information.”

It doesn’t seem to require that the essay be written for class credit, or suggest a word limit or range. So, if you don’t have any appropriate pieces lying around, you can start writing now to meet that end-of-summer deadline. You’ll want to follow the rather loose guidelines for submission to the journal, at the bottom of this page:

“Authors should send to the appropriate editor one copy of their work – either in hard copy or in electronic form as a Microsoft Word file, or both – which should be typed double spaced (including notes and citations) and documented in accordance with the Chicago Manual of Style. The manuscript may be submitted as an email attachment, after advance notice to the editor. The title page should include the author’s name, telephone number, postal address, and E-mail address. Contributors are welcome to submit illustrations and graphs with their texts. Due to the journal’s book-length format, essays of unusual length are welcome. Submissions acceptable to the editors will be double reviewed by outside experts in the field.”

Access to previous issues of Book History can be had through membership in SHARP or Project Muse. You might also be interested in this list of past essay prize winners.