Job Posting: Curatorial Assistant, Museum of Modern Art, NYC

Curatorial Assistant (one-year, fixed-term) | Architecture and Design

Assists senior curator and curatorial team with administrative, logistical, and research tasks in preparation for an upcoming modern and contemporary fashion design exhibition (scheduled to open in the fall of 2017) and accompanying publication. Supports the preparation of checklists, loan agreement forms, and related educational materials. Assists in scheduling work to be done within the Museum as a liaison with various internal departments. Researches and writes correspondence with external parties, including institutional and individual lenders to the exhibition, and external design collaborators. Assists in compiling, organizing, formatting, and editing exhibition and catalogue data for completeness and accuracy. Supports catalogue preparation, including obtaining image rights for publication, print, and digital use. Supports the production and preparation of wall texts and labels. Assists with a variety of other editorial, administrative, and organizational tasks for the exhibition. Performs research support functions for the exhibition, including library and archival research on the history of 20th-century fashion design. Reports to Senior Curator, Department of Architecture and Design.

Requirements:

  • Master’s degree or equivalent graduate work in design, art, architectural history, or curatorial studies.
  • Specialization in modern or contemporary fashion design history, specifically in textiles and garments, and a strong knowledge of relevant current and historical scholarship in the field preferred.
  • Strong and comprehensive experience within a museum institution working on exhibition planning and administration, including working with museum collection databases and multi-departmental liaising a plus.
  • Familiarity with researching archives, securing copyright permissions, and clearing image rights highly preferred. Excellent writing, research, and organizational skills.
  • Highly motivated.
  • Strict attention to detail with a rigorous approach to tasks.
  • Strong initiative and ability to work on multiple tasks simultaneously and meet deadlines.

MoMA Jobs application guidelines
If you would like to submit your resume and cover letter for consideration, please choose one of the following options:
By email: jobs@moma.org (most preferred option)
By fax: (212) 333-1107
By mail: The Museum of Modern Art
The Department of Human Resources
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY 10019

Full post: https://www.moma.org/about/jobs

Job Posting: Multiple Opportunities at MoMa, NYC

Cataloger (grant-funded, fixed-term) | Archives
Identifies key archives collections and prioritizes select files. Consults original documents and selects most important and historically significant records. Catalogs selected items into the Museum Archives Image Database. Coordinates scanning of items with Imaging and Visual Resources. Pages and reshelves boxes, files, and single items. Ensures quality control of metadata and image scans. Reports to Archives Specialist.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree in art history, including 12 semester hours of modern art since 1880, or equivalent. Basic knowledge of art historical research sources. Archival experience preferred. Ability to communicate clearly and legibly in both written and spoken form. Attention to detail. Knowledge of archival/art historical/collection management databases. Ability to lift and move heavy boxes.

This is a two-year project initiative expected to commence as soon as a qualified candidate has been identified. Total work hours per week will be 14.

Curatorial Assistant | Architecture and Design
Assists the department’s senior architecture curatorial staff in all areas of their responsibilities, including acquisitions, collections records, bibliographic and biographical records and files, research for architecture exhibitions and publications, loans, and general curatorial inquiries. Performs work in relation to the care of the collection and arranges for custodial, registration, and preparation work as required by the curatorial staff in the maintenance of the collection in gallery, study, and storage areas. Performs research for exhibitions, including research on artists, periods, styles, specific works, locations of works, on photograph sources, etc. Assists in preparing catalogues and checklists. Coordinates and schedules work to be done, within the Museum and without, in such areas as conversation, photography, public information, matting and framing, construction, lighting, etc. Assists with the preparation and installation of wall labels. Conducts daily inspection of works on view in temporary exhibitions and assists with necessary follow-up arrangements. Answers inquiries and conducts some gallery tours as necessary for visitors and the A+D Circle affiliate group. Researches and catalogs the Museum collection and archives under senior staff supervisor and answers related inquiries from public and scholars. Reports to senior curatorial titles.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree required, master’s degree preferred, ideally in architecture or art history. Some relevant work experience and competence within area of departmental interest. Strong organizational skills and attention to detail. Proficiency with MS Word, Excel, and other standard office procedures and equipment. Reading knowledge of one or more foreign languages.

Curatorial Assistant | Drawings and Prints
Assists the department’s senior curatorial staff in all areas of their responsibilities, including administrative work in the context of curatorial functions such as acquisitions, collections records, bibliographic and biographical records and files, research for exhibitions and publications, departmental committee loans, and general curatorial inquiries. Performs work in relation to care of the collection and expedites arrangements for custodial, registration, and preparation work as required by the curators in the maintenance of the collection in gallery, study, and storage areas. Conducts daily collection gallery inspections and assists with follow-up arrangements in the event of damage, deterioration, etc. Performs duties of exhibitions assistant, including research on subjects such as artists, periods, styles, etc., on specific works, on locations of works, on photograph sources, etc. Assists in arranging loans; catalogue preparation; preparation of checklists including compiling and typing; and coordinating and scheduling work to be done, within the Museum and without, in such areas as conservation, photography, public information, matting and framing, construction, lighting, etc. Assists with the preparation and installation of wall labels. Conducts daily inspection of works on view in temporary exhibitions and assists with necessary follow-up arrangements. Answers inquiries and conducts some gallery tours as necessary for visitors, etc. Researches and catalogs the Museum collection and archives under senior staff supervision and answers related inquiries from the public and scholars. Assists in the operation of departmental study centers. Works with curatorial interns as assigned. Keeps informed of current activity in the area of departmental interests through gallery and museum visits, publications, etc. and conveys observations to the senior staff. Reports to Chief Curator.

Requirements: Master’s degree in art history strongly preferred with a particular expertise/exposure to art from the postwar period through to contemporary. Prior curatorial experience preferred. Superior research and writing skills and fluency in a foreign language preferred. Strong organizational skills and attention to detail. Proficiency with MS Word, Excel, and other standard office procedures and equipment.


If you would like to submit your resume and cover letter for consideration, please choose one of the following options:

  • By email: jobs@moma.org (most preferred option; if submitting by email, please send us your resume and cover letter as one document in a PDF format)
  • By fax: (212) 333-1107
  • By mail: The Museum of Modern Art
    The Department of Human Resources
    11 West 53 Street
    New York, NY 10019

Full postings: http://www.moma.org/about/jobs

Save the Date: Contemporary Artists’ Books Conference in NYC

Contemporary Artists’ Books ConferenceSeptember 30 – October 1, 2011
in conjunction with the Printed Matter New York Art Book Fair
MoMA PS1, Long Island City, New York

This dynamic, two-day program focuses on emerging practices and debates within art-book culture. This year’s sessions feature a keynote by artist Tauba Auerbach, and sessions on an array of topics, including: artists’ books from Latin America, non-commercial distribution practices, contemporary criticism, and the pedagogical use of artists’ books in the juvenile justice system.

Thanks to generous funding by David Teiger and Phillip Aarons, the conference is free to the public for the first time.  

[Editor’s note: I’ve attended this conference/fair twice and it’s a wonderful event–engaging panels, amazing opportunity to interact with artists and booksellers, plus a lovely social atmosphere.  I highly recommend it, even more so now that it’s free.  RKJD]

Call for Papers: Chicago Digital Humanities Colloquium

Dear Friends,

The Call for Papers for the Chicago Digital Humanities/Computer Science Colloquium ( Nov 1st-3rd, 2008 ) has now been published on the Colloquium website (http://dhcs.uchicago.edu). On behalf of the organizing committee, I would like to encourage you to submit proposals for the 2008 DHCS and look forward to seeing you again in Chicago!

with best regards,

Arno Bosse
Senior Director of Technology
Division of the Humanities
University of Chicago
1115 E. 58th St., Walker Room 001B
Chicago, IL 60637
Phone: 773-702-6177
Fax: 773-834-5867

———–

Call for Papers: 2008 Chicago Digital Humanities/Computer Science Colloquium

Sponsored by the Humanities Division, the Computational Institute, NSIT Academic Technologies and the University Library at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University and the College of Science and Letters at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

DHCS Colloquium, November 1st – 3rd, 2008 Submission Deadline: August 31st, 2008

The goal of the annual Chicago Digital Humanities/Computer Science (DHCS) Colloquium is to bring together researchers and scholars in the Humanities and Computer Sciences to examine the current state of Digital Humanities as a field of intellectual inquiry and to identify and explore new directions and perspectives for future research. In 2006, the first DHCS Colloquium examined the challenges and opportunities posed by the “million books” digitization projects. The second DHCS Colloquium in 2007 focused on searching and querying as tools and methodologies.

The theme of the third Chicago DHCS Colloquium is “Making Sense”- an exploration of how meaning is created and apprehended at the transition of the digital and the analog.

We encourage submissions from scholars and researchers on all topics that intersect current theory and practice in the Humanities and Computer Science.

Website:

http://dhcs.uchicago.edu

Location:

The University of Chicago
Ida Noyes Hall
1212 East 59th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

Keynote Speakers:

Oren Etzioni is Director of the Turing Center and Professor of Computer Science at the University of Washington where his current research interests include fundamental problems in the study of artificial intelligence, web search, machine reading, and machine learning. Etzioni was the founder of Farecast, a company that utilizes data mining techniques to anticipate airfare fluctuations, and the KnowItAll project, which is is building domain-independent systems to extract information from the Web in an autonomous, scalable manner. Etzioni has published extensively in his field and served as an Associate Editor of the ACM Transactions on the Web and on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery, amongst others.

Stephen Downie is Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include the design and evaluation of IR systems, including multimedia music information retrieval, the political economy of inter-networked communication systems, database design and web-based technologies. Downie is the principal investigator of the International Music Information Retrieval Systems Evaluation Laboratory (IMIRSEL), which is working on producing a large, secure corpus of audio and symbolic music data accessible to the music information retrieval (MIR) community.

Martin Wattenberg is a computer scientist and new media artist whose work focuses on the visual explorations of culturally significant data (http://www.bewitched.com). He is the founding manager of IBM’s Visual Communication Lab, which researches new forms of visualization and how they can enable better collaboration. The lab’s latest project is Many Eyes, an experiment in open, public data visualization and analysis. Wattenberg is also known for his visualization-based artwork, which has been exhibited in venues such as the London Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the New York Museum of Modern Art.

Program Committee:

* Shlomo Argamon, Computer Science Department, Illinois Institute of Technology * Helma Dik, Department of Classics, University of Chicago
* John Goldsmith, Department of Linguistics, Computer Science, Computation Institute, University of Chicago
* Catherine Mardikes, Bibliographer for Classics, the Ancient Near East, and General Humanities, University of Chicago Library
* Robert Morrissey, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Director of the ARTFL Project, University of Chicago
* Martin Mueller, Department of English and Classics, Northwestern University
* Mark Olsen, Associate Director of the ARTFL Project, University of Chicago
* Jason Salavon, Department of Visual Arts, Computation Institute, University of Chicago
* Kotoka Suzuki, Department of Music, Visual Arts, University of Chicago

Call for Participation:

Participation in the colloquium is open to all. We welcome submissions for:

* Paper presentations (20 minute maximum)
* Poster sessions
* Software demonstrations
* Performances

Suggested submission topics:

* Visualizing Large Data: Lessons from Industry & Big Science
* Computing Cinematic Syntax
* Linguistic and Literary Perspectives on Data Mining
* Social Scholarship / Socialized Search
* Agent Based Modelling
* Cartography and the Digital Traveler
* Serious Gaming
* Programming Algorithmic Art
* Statistical Analyses and Literary Meaning
* From a Maze of Twisty Passages: Future Interactive Fiction
* Representing Reading Time
* Hacking the Wiimote / Pwning the iPhone
* Polyglot Machines: Machine Translation
* The Subjectivity of Visualization
* Schemas for Scholars: Historicizing Machine Learning Ontologies
* Computational Stylistics
* Deconstructing Machine Learning
* The Library Catalog as Social Network: Library 2.0
* Mapping Social Relationships in the Novel
* Tagging Texts for Scholarly Practice
* Exploring Augmented Reality Systems

Submission Format:

Please submit a (2 page maximum) abstract in Adobe PDF (preferred) or MS Word format to dhcs-submissions@listhost.uchicago.edu.

Graduate Student Travel Fund:

A limited number of bursaries are available to assist graduate students who are presenting at the colloquium with their travel and accommodation expenses. No separate application form is required. Current graduate students whose proposals have been accepted for the colloquium will be contacted by the organizers with more details.

Important Dates:

Deadline for Submissions: Monday, August 31st
Notification of Acceptance: Monday, September 15th
Full Program Announcement: Monday, September 22nd
Registration: Monday, September 22nd – Friday, October 24th
Colloquium: Saturday, November 1st – Monday, November 3rd

Contact Info:

Please direct all inquiries to: dhcs-submissions@listhost.uchicago.edu

Organizing Committee:

* Arno Bosse, Senior Director for Technology, Humanities Division, University of Chicago.
* Helma Dik, Department of Classics, University of Chicago
* Catherine Mardikes, Bibliographer for Classics, the Ancient Near East, and General Humanities, University of Chicago Library.
* Mark Olsen, Associate Director, ARTFL Project, University of Chicago