Reference Librarian (2 vacancies), Prints & Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington DC

The Reference Librarian is a knowledge navigator responsible for providing reference, research, consultation, and liaison services; instructions and training; and security for Prints and Photographs Division collections. P&P holds more than 14 million items in a variety of visual formats in hundreds of individual collections stored in local and remote sites. The collections are among the Library’s most varied in medium, format, physical condition, and intellectual property rights requirements, with attendant concerns for security, preservation, and safe handling. The collections are accessed by means of complex, diverse, and often multi-layered intellectual controls and surrogates in written, filmed, and digital forms. As one of the largest pictorial archives in the world, P&P plays a critical role in establishing a positive image of the Library and furthering the Library’s goal of providing a high level of responsive, effective, and professional public access and outreach services to the full range of Library users worldwide, including members of Congress and their staff, other agencies, scholars, researchers, and mass media.

This position is located in the Reference Section, Prints and Photographs Division, Collections and Services Directorate, Library Services.

Information and application: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/451342700

Internship Opportunity: Junior Fellow Summer Intern Program, Library of Congress, DC

For a full list of projects and their descriptions, please visit: http://www.loc.gov/hr/jrfellows/about.html

Program Overview

The Library of Congress Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program enables undergraduate and graduate students to experience the integrated analog and digital collections and services of the world’s largest, all-inclusive library. Working under the direction of Library curators and specialists in various divisions, fellows explore digital initiatives and increase access to the institution’s unparalleled collections and resources. Fellows are exposed to a broad spectrum of library work: copyright, preservation, reference, access, and information technology. In the past, summer fellows have identified hundreds of historical, literary, artistic, cinematic and musical gems representing the Library’s rich cultural, creative and intellectual assets. No previous experience is necessary, but fellowships are competitive and special skills or knowledge is usually desired. Selections are based on academic achievement, letters of recommendation, and an interview with a selection official. Applications for the 2016 Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program will be available December 7, 2015 through January 22, 2016 at the following web link:https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/423248100

Program Focus

The focus of the program is to increase access to special, legal and copyright collections, and promoting awareness and appreciation of the Library’s services to researchers including Congressional members, scholars, students, teachers, and the general public. Fellows encourage the use of collections and services − ensuring that the Library of Congress is known as a living, dynamic center for scholarly work and connections. Program participants inventory, catalog, arrange, preserve, and research collections in varied formats, as well as assist in digital library initiatives. Upon completion of their assignments, fellows work closely with Library curators and specialists to plan and present a display of their most significant discoveries and accomplishments. The program is made possible through the generosity of the late Mrs. Jefferson Patterson and the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund. A gift from H.F. (Gerry) Lenfest, chairman emeritus of the Library’s James Madison Council private-sector advisory group, established the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund, which will bring outstanding talent to the Library to benefit from first-hand interactions with its unparalleled collections, experts and programs and train future leaders for the information age. The goal of the fund is to energize innovation and creativity across all sectors by providing access to an expanding universe of information that is reliable and authentic.

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Eligibility

Applicants must be U. S. citizens, currently enrolled in a degree-granting program of study at an accredited institution of higher learning at the undergraduate (college, university, or Tribal College) or graduate levels, or have graduated no earlier than spring 2016 from an undergraduate or graduate program. Applicants must be a first time intern with the Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program. Program participants from previous years are not eligible to reapply.

Terms

The 2016 summer fellowships begin May 31, 2016 and end August 5, 2016. Fellows work full-time (40 hours per week), Monday through Friday, and receive a taxable income of $300.00 per week.

Fellows are temporary employees of the Library of Congress and are not eligible for Federal Employee benefits and privileges. However, they are protected by worker’s compensation laws and eligible for a Transit Benefits Program for qualified individuals who use the Metro System, Virginia Railway Express, MARC commuter trains, county and commercial buses, and qualified commercial van pools to commute to their jobs at the Library.

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Application Process

Applications for the 2016 Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program will be accepted athttps://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/423248100 starting December 7, 2015 through January 22, 2016.

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Application Deadline

All applications (and supporting documents) must be received by the deadline January 22, 2016, 11:59 PM. Incomplete application packages will not be considered.

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Selection Process

Applications will be forwarded to selecting officials in the Library who will arrange telephone interviews with promising applicants, based on materials submitted. After completion of the selection process those selected will be provided with detailed information on reporting for their fellowship.

The Library of Congress is an equal opportunity employer. Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities who meet eligibility requirements are strongly encouraged to apply.

Job Posting: Library Technician (4 vacancies), Prints & Photographs Division, Library of Congress, DC

Note: I did a summer fellowship with the folks in Tech Services at Prints & Photographs and they are a wonderful group of people to work with! The position has a strong archives focus, but a background in art/art history is highly valued. Federal applications can be daunting and confusing, but I’d be happy to offer some tips and pointers for surviving the process.

This position is located in the Technical Services Section of Prints & Photographs Division, Library Services, which acquires, organizes, describes, preserves, and makes available for research use a wide variety of original and historical visual materials in both physical and digital formats.

The incumbent works alone or with a team to prepare collections for service. This processing work involves archival arrangement, bibliographic description, inventory control, and collections management tasks such as recognizing different visual formats, sorting and labeling, foldering and boxing, performing digital reformatting and quality review, and entering pertinent information into inventory databases and library catalogs according to standard procedures.

Duties

Incumbent applies numerous established practices in processing materials, consisting of original and historical visual formats including photographic prints and negatives, fine and historical prints, documentary and architectural design drawings, posters, cartoons, and digital files. Recognizes various types of material in order to receive, accession, sort, and arrange collections in different ways (e.g., by format, alphabetic, chronologic, geographic, or numeric). Prepares material for use and storage by performing basic filing, archival housing, hand-marking, automated labeling, barcoding, and shelving tasks. Consults about material that is duplicate, extraneous, or in need of evaluation for special preservation treatment.

Performs collection management activities for a variety of material, including pulling and re-filing, transferring material to and from off-site storage, keeping stack location guides up to date, preservation stabilization such as replacing worn folders and boxes, relabeling, marking for identification and security, shelf reading, and collection shifting.

Prepares a variety of material for digital and other reformatting by counting items, transporting to duplication service, and reviewing duplicated images for adherence to established quality standards.

Compiles and maintains records of processing activities and completes appropriate forms for statistical reports.

Performs a sequence of detailed routines in searching online databases to identify what physical and digital items are in the division’s care and helps track where they are. Compiles and enters information in automated and manual systems for inventories, container lists, or other kinds of finding aids using box and folder information and other data gathered during processing or provided by senior staff. Prepares preliminary access or inventory records for single items or collections using judgment to apply a substantial number of established procedures of the division to capture call numbers, creator names, titles, dates, and physical description. Searches online and print resources to research and verify information including place names and creator names. Proofs records to ensure accuracy and updates data as needed. Determines the correctness of data within the appropriate fields. Identifies duplicated entries.

Develops and maintains a good working knowledge of microcomputer operations and of designated microcomputer software packages for word processing, database management, statistical compilations, and bibliographic production.

Performs other duties as assigned.

Required Qualifications:

Applicants must have had progressively responsible experience and training sufficient in scope and quality to furnish them with an acceptable level of the following knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform the duties of the position without more than normal supervision.

Ability to use computerized input and search tools. **

Knowledge of library processes and procedures.**

Knowledge of visual materials in library collections.**

Ability to plan work and meet deadlines.

Ability to communicate and interact with others.

Ability to communicate effectively other than in writing.

Full posting: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/422937000

 

LOC’s The Signal: All About Digital Art

In case you’re in the market for some light summer reading:

The Library of Congress has a great digital preservation blog called The Signal. Recently they’ve been focusing on plenty of art-related issues, from digital art (and the power of the GIF) to preserving artists’ websites and communities.

There’s even some meta content, in the form of an interview with someone who talks about libraries and archives as aesthetic experiences:

Shannon: As I mentioned earlier, I’ve always loved teaching about, with, and through art. Art offers us so many rich and wonderful things (or events, or ideas…) to think with, and it helps us recognize that understanding isn’t purely cognitive; it’s also affective, aesthetic. Archives and libraries, I argue, are intensely aesthetic environments: information reaches us in various forms and materialities; we store that information on bookshelves and server racks; we access it on tabletops and laptops and through interfaces. These are all aesthetic variables that have, in my mind, huge epistemological significance. And acknowledging archives, libraries and databases as aesthetic entities not only helps patrons to better understand how they think and learn; but it also, ideally, helps practitioners recognize that the physical and digital environments they create aren’t neutral containers of information: they give shape to information and knowledge, and thus constitute what it is.

Shannon Mattern goes on to offer examples of artists working with the form of libraries and archives (not just their content). (Feel free to add this to your resource list for library advocacy, Ellen!)

You can always sign up to receive The Signal’s Digital Preservation newsletter in your inbox (if, like me, you forgot to regularly check even your favourite blogs). It’s a great resource to help you keep on top of digital developments, even if you’re not planning to focus on the tech side of GLAM work.

LOC's The Signal: All About Digital Art

In case you’re in the market for some light summer reading:

The Library of Congress has a great digital preservation blog called The Signal. Recently they’ve been focusing on plenty of art-related issues, from digital art (and the power of the GIF) to preserving artists’ websites and communities.

There’s even some meta content, in the form of an interview with someone who talks about libraries and archives as aesthetic experiences:

Shannon: As I mentioned earlier, I’ve always loved teaching about, with, and through art. Art offers us so many rich and wonderful things (or events, or ideas…) to think with, and it helps us recognize that understanding isn’t purely cognitive; it’s also affective, aesthetic. Archives and libraries, I argue, are intensely aesthetic environments: information reaches us in various forms and materialities; we store that information on bookshelves and server racks; we access it on tabletops and laptops and through interfaces. These are all aesthetic variables that have, in my mind, huge epistemological significance. And acknowledging archives, libraries and databases as aesthetic entities not only helps patrons to better understand how they think and learn; but it also, ideally, helps practitioners recognize that the physical and digital environments they create aren’t neutral containers of information: they give shape to information and knowledge, and thus constitute what it is.

Shannon Mattern goes on to offer examples of artists working with the form of libraries and archives (not just their content). (Feel free to add this to your resource list for library advocacy, Ellen!)

You can always sign up to receive The Signal’s Digital Preservation newsletter in your inbox (if, like me, you forgot to regularly check even your favourite blogs). It’s a great resource to help you keep on top of digital developments, even if you’re not planning to focus on the tech side of GLAM work.