Job Posting: Librarian, National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

Summary

This position is within the staff of the Deputy Director (DD) in the Library Reader Services Department (DLR) of the National Gallery of Art (NGA). The purpose of this position is to oversee and provide a variety of interlibrary loan (ILL) services as well as reference and reader services to NGA curatorial and administrative staff, CASVA staff and fellows, and organizations and indivuduals outside the Gallery.

Duties
The incumbent:

  • Processes ILL requests received from other libraries
  • Verifies NGA Library holdings, checks current ILL policy for circulation status and physical condition of requested material, and acknowledges the requests via international databases such as OCLC, and following established ALA procedures
  • Prepares materials for shipment and ensures their timely return; follows up on all outstanding loans by communicating with borrowers by telephone, fax, and regular or electronic mail
  • Processes ILL requests to libraries other than the Library of Congress
  • Verifies bibliographic citations in European foreign languages found in printed or online sources, locates appropriate lending libraries, and places requests using procedures established by bibliographic utilities, or ALA
  • Explains ILL services to patrons and instructs them in the methodology of verifying requests
  • Maintains effective working relationships with libraries throughout the United States in order to ensure responsive ILL service to Gallery staff
  • Assists in the establishment of procedures for handling ILL loan transactions, including the maintenance of records and compiles ILL statistics and prepares monthly and special reports
  • Assists NGA staff and CASVA fellows in searching print and online resources for potential interlibrary loans; performs complex and difficult searches for rare, obscure, or other hard-to-find volumes and
  • Assists staff in identifying and interpreting bibliographic records found in print and online indexes.
  • Reader Services and Reference tasks include:
  • Discusses research needs of outside potential readers through application of professionally accepted reference interview techniques; explains and interprets policy on library use and refers readers to other libraries when appropriate
  • Admits and registers outside readers according to established Library guidelines, and provides orientation to public areas
  • Assists Gallery staff, CASVA fellows, and outside readers in the use of the Library’s online resources, including the Library’s online catalog
  • Answers reference questions received by telephone, letter, or in person from simple questions answerable from ready reference tools to complex questions requiring extended research in the Library’s collections and outside sources
  • Performs literature searches in response to staff requests using the Library’s print, microform, non-print, and vertical file collections
  • Assists with the preparation of updates to the Reader Services department’s orientation materials
  • Participates in the development of the Library’s reference and general collections by referring ILL requests to the Reader Services Librarian for possible acquisition
  • Organizes and maintains Reference Office files; reviews exhibition announcements and maintains the collection of current bulletins and announcements from other institutions throughout the nation and selected European institutions and
  • Compiles monthly reference statistics and prepares special statistical reports as requested.

Qualifications
SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Applicants must have a minimum of one year of specialized experience at a level of difficulty and responsibility comparable to the next lower grade or comparable pay band in the Federal service or equivalent experience in the private sector.

Candidates must meet the Qualification Standards Handbook requirements for the GS-1410-9. This requires at least one year of specialized experience equivalent to the GS-7 level in the Federal service OR two full years of progressively higher level graduate education or Master’s degree in library science which has been supplemented by coursework in both art history and Western European languages such as Italian, French, Dutch, German, and/or Spanish. Specialized experience is defined as professional librarianship experience that has involved performing interlibrary loan and reference services within a research environment which required knowledge of art history and Western European languages such as Italian, French, Dutch, German, and/or Spanish to perform work assignments. Equivalent combinations of education and experience are qualifying for this grade level.

Candidates must reflect in their submitted USAJOBS résumés the possession of this specialized experience. If their résumés do not include such specialized experience, they will be ineligible for this position.

Those applicants who meet the minimum qualification requirements will be evaluated against these factors to determine the best-qualified candidates. Candidates should ensure their résumé and submitted materials clearly demonstrate possession of these factors to receive maximum employment consideration.

  • Knowledge of bibliographic searching methods, including obscure materials and foreign language publications, often from incomplete or inaccurate citations.
  • Knowledge of the literature of art history and humanities, particularly sources of information, bibliographic tools, reference works, and specialized subject collections.
  • Knowledge of the content and search methodology of highly specialized online bibliographic, periodical, image, and full-text databases.
  • Reading knowledge of at least two Western European languages, (preferably Italian and French) and familiarity with art historical and bibliographic terminology in the remaining major European languages.
  • Knowledge of procedures for ILL operations. At least one year of experience using Illiad, Adobe Acrobat, and automated bibliographic systems such as OCLC and Voyager.

 

Deadline to apply: December 2, 2016

Full post: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/456838800/

Job Post: Liaison Librarian for the School of Interactive Arts & Technologies, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC

https://partnershipjobs.ca/jobs/1579

The deadline for this job competition is May 2nd, 2016.

Simon Fraser University Library invites applications for a Librarian for Interactive Arts & Technology and Publishing. Reporting to the Head, Fraser Library, this full-time, term (August 2, 2016 to July 28, 2017) position will be based at Fraser Library, Surrey campus and will support the School of Interactive Arts & Technology (SIAT) at the Surrey campus and the Publishing program at the Vancouver campus.

This position will be attractive to a very adaptable and innovative individual with excellent communication and collaborative skills and a strong public service focus; one who is highly motivated to embrace new technologies and to provide services to faculty and students.

ASSIGNMENT

  • Act as liaison between the SFU Library and the faculty, staff and students in SIAT and Publishing at the Surrey and Vancouver campuses.
    • Promote library services and collections and report the discipline’s requirements to the appropriate area of the library.
    • In collaboration with Collections Management develop, assess, and manage information resources in all formats to address the teaching and research needs of SIAT and Publishing. This may include maintaining the collection policy; maintaining profiles for approval plans; reviewing subscriptions; selecting material; providing budget oversight; other collection activities.
    • Communicate with faculty and students in SIAT and Publishing about trends in scholarly communication and publishing, and promote the library’s programs in this area.
  • Provide instruction and assistance to students and faculty in the use of information sources through instructional seminars, guides, and individual consultations.
  • Provide in-person and online reference service in all disciplines as a member of a team serving students and faculty in an active research environment.
  • Work with other library staff on project teams and committees.
  • Develop professional knowledge, skills, and disciplinary expertise on a continuing basis.
  • Participate in professional organizations.
  • Note that while the current assignment is for SIAT and Publishing, areas may be reassigned as needed.

QUALIFICATIONS
Required:

  • MLIS or equivalent from an accredited institution.
  • Reference, collections, and instruction experience.
  • Demonstrated ability to assist students and faculty in a busy research environment.
  • Demonstrated ability to master electronic information sources thoroughly and quickly.
  • Demonstrated skill in planning and delivering instruction.
  • Demonstrated ability to work effectively in a collegial team environment.
  • Superior interpersonal and intercultural skills.
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills.

Desired:

  • Reference and collections experience in a related discipline.
  • Broad knowledge of bibliographic tools and electronic resources in a related discipline.
  • Academic library experience.
  • Experience with education technology products.
  • Degree in related discipline.

Job Posting: Visual Resources Librarian, Lafayette College, Easton, PA

http://hr.lafayette.edu/2014/09/17/visual-resources-librarian/

The Visual Resources Librarian, embedded within the Department of Art, coordinates the creation, management, and use of Visual Resources for art history and studio art instruction at Lafayette College, as well as for faculty and students from other academic departments.  Manages digital imaging lab within the Department of Art.  Participates in the Library’s instruction program, serving as campus lead for visual literacy education.  Contributes to the development of disciplinary image collections to support the curriculum, including image production, using and displaying digital assets, and consultation on best practices for daily use of digital resources.

August 19th: #SLATalk tackles entrepreneurship

Short notice, but the Twitter-advice-fest that is #SLATalk is happening tomorrow, August 19th at 3:00 pm EDT – 4:00pm EDT. As it’s pursuant to some of the other content [I made] on this blog, I thought I’d pass it along!

#SLAtalk: Trailblazing! Info Pros and the Entrepreneurial Spirit

Join @SLAhq and the Association of Independent Information Professionals (@AIIP) for an hour-long Twitter chat about what it takes to be a trailblazing information professional. Whether you are already an independent info pro, looking for a career change or are leading the pack from within your company, share how you exemplify an entrepreneurial spirit within your industry.
Tuesday, August 19th from 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm EDT
What time is that where you are? http://time.is/compare

 

►        New to doing a Twitter chat? Take a look at “How to #SLAtalk” http://www.sla.org/slatalk-plus-slatalk-archives/

►        Follow @SLAhq and @AIIP – and use hashtag #SLAtalk to be a part of the conversation!

 

Q1       (first 15 minutes)        Talk about an entrepreneurial break-through moment in your career. If you own your own research business, how did you win your first client? If you provide in-house services to a company, how did you “sell” your services to an important member of the organization? Or, how did you gain the support needed to undertake an important project?

Q2       (second 15 minutes)    Personal branding. Whether you work independently or in-house, how do you make yourself known? More than just marketing, how do you be a self-starting, risk tolerant and just an all-around go-getter in order to be a trailblazing info pro?

Q3       (third 15 minutes)       If you’re thinking about making the leap into the independent info pro world, what tips or advice would you like to know? If you are already independent, what would you tell someone new to your professional community?

Q4       (fourth 15 minutes)     What are some best practices to having an entrepreneurial spirit? What are some skills, mantras or attitudes one can create and maintain for themselves in order to keep the spirit alive?

Can’t join us live on Twitter? Check the SLA Blog’s #SLAtalk category for the recap which will be posted following the session.

≪ Professional Development Reading List Klaxon
Brush up on what it means to be an entrepreneur with some of these articles below:

Job Posting: Digital Media Librarian, Cineplex Entertainment, Toronto

http://ca.linkedin.com/jobs2/view/10984342

 

The Entertainment Content team is seeking an extremely organized person with records management experience for the position of Digital Media Librarian.  The main focus of this position is to manage and expand a digital asset management system which will drive efficiencies and allow better asset sharing across the company.  We need an enthusiastic individual who loves working as part of a team and who will take ownership over the whole DAM system.  PS – did we say you get to watch movies for free?

Duties and Responsibilities include:

  • Maintain the current library for all of Cineplex’s digital creative assets.
  • Work in conjunction with the production team to create life cycle management strategy, including cataloguing, storage, retrieval, distribution, and disposal of digital assets.
  • Use, monitor and optimize metadata schema to enhance discoverability of digital assets.
  • Fulfill requests for assets and deliverables from internal stakeholders as well as external clients.
  • Roll out Digital Asset Management system to other Cineplex offices in Toronto and Waterloo.
  • Monitor data migration/synchronization tasks using CatDV software, integrated with the Cineplex information architecture.
  • Train producers, editors, creative artists and other stakeholders in digital asset management procedures.
  • Assist stakeholders with day-to-day duties including ingesting and shot listing of raw shoot footage, transcoding media, organizing assets, adding metadata, sourcing and posting assets, etc.
  • Other duties as required.

Desired Skills and Experience:

Soft Skills:

  • High level of accuracy and attention to detail.
  • Superior organizational and time management skills.
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills.
  • Exceptional work ethic.
  • Capacity to learn constantly and quickly.
  • Must be flexible and be able to work under pressure.
  • Able to work independently.
  • Knowledge of French (written and verbal) is an asset.

Hard Skills / Experience:

  • Three years’ experience in a film or video library setting.
  • Experience with digital archive strategies, records management, library and information management, or archive management.
  • Experience with DAM systems; knowledge of Cat DV is an asset.
  • Strong familiarity with video and graphic design file formats.
  • Familiar with Microsoft Office.
  • Fluent with FTP programs.
  • Must be Mac proficient.
  • Media transcoding experience; knowledge of Digital Rapids Transcode manager is an asset.

There is no deadline for applications, and no given salary information.

Interview: Life as The Banff Centre's Library Work-Study

For those of you thinking about spending six months in gorgeous Banff, Alberta (yes, international applicants are encouraged!):
Here are some words of wisdom from last year’s Library Work-Study, Jaye Fishel, who spent her tenure working to promote and display the Banff Centre’s insane collection of artists’ books. Jaye kindly answered my questions about being an American book-nerd in Alberta, the projects she worked on, and the application procedures to get into one of Canada’s prettiest cultural institutions.

The Banff Centre Library
The Banff Centre Library

ArLiSNAP: Can you start with a bit of your background?

Jaye Fishel: I was an artist before I got my MLIS degree, which I in-part pursued to professionalize my interest in artists’ books in particular. I worked in the rare books library during my undergraduate studies (at Emory University) and was introduced to artists’ books in processing collections. That led me to move to San Francisco in 2005 to study at the Center for the Book there, where I learned letterpress printing and other techniques. Since then, I’ve expanded my artistic repertoire but books and works on paper still figure largely into what I’m interested in engaging with, both professionally and as an artist.

ArLiSNAP: What were you doing previous to taking the work-study position?

JF: I was living in Oakland, unable to find a professional position suitable for me. I only realized after graduating with my MLIS that any job, let alone a job dealing with artists’ books, was very difficult to come by.

ArLiSNAP: What was the application process like?

JF: The application process was straightforward — I submitted a project proposal in addition to a standard cover letter that outlined a project I would produce while at the Centre. Since the work-study position is an educational program, like an internship, I stated some learning objectives. Applying to work in Canada from the US seemed to have little bearing on the application process, although once I accepted the position, I had to secure a student visa, which did not show up until the day before my flight to Banff, causing more than a little anxiety.

ArLiSNAP: A student visa?

JF: I needed a student visa because the work-study program is considered an educational program, so technically I was a student in the eyes of the Canadian government. Work-study participants receive a stipend, not a salary, and are generally treated differently than staff at the Centre.

ArLiSNAP: What attracted you to the position?

JF: The job description was like a dream! Working fairly exclusively with the artists’-books collection in an international art residency centre? I was attracted to everything about that. Plus, I needed a change in my life, so I felt ready to move to remote Banff from the Bay Area, which was changing rapidly before my eyes into a place that felt less and less accommodating to artists and craftspeople. I was also attracted to the adventure.

ArLiSNAP: What period of time were you there? What was it like moving to Banff and settling in?

JF: I arrived in Mid-May and I left at the end of February, so I was there for nine months. It was an adventure the entire time — living in the middle of the Canadian Rockies in an art residency center was unlike my life in the Bay. I hadn’t lived through a snowy winter since I was a child, so that was definitely an adjustment, as was living in a very small tourist town. I had a sometimes quiet, simple existence — sometimes filled with lots of art and parties and people from all over the world.

ArLiSNAP: What was a typical work day like?

JF: I worked four days a week, nine to five, with one day away from the library to work on outside research or projects. Typical days usually included working on artists’-book catalog records, planning upcoming events, and working with patrons. Then I’d walk home and see at least one deer or elk, on average.

ArLiSNAP: You started a few neat initiatives while you were there. Can you tell us about getting those programs going?

JF: I had a lot of freedom to create new initiatives and work on a variety of projects. The bulk of what I did at times was cataloging, or improving the very basic cataloging of the artists’ books collection, which is extensive at over 4,300 items. I would pull items from a particular press or artist at once to make comprehensive improvements to parts of the collection that relate to one another. I also initiated a public program series of artists’ books showcases, where I would pull random items from the collection and invite the resident artists and the public to engage with the items. I also started a several-year-long project to display every item in the artists’ books collection in a case in the library, as well as online via documentary images. (http://banffcentrelibraryandarchives.tumblr.com/)

I had wonderful support from my mentor, Suzanne Rackover, to do whatever I wanted with my time to enhance use of the collections. So I just came to her with my ideas and she supported my process. For the artists’ books showcases, I would loosely try to pull items that would be of interest to visual artists on residencies. I would make sort of weird promotional fliers and hand them out and post around campus. Setting up the Tumblr project required simply creating a randomized spreadsheet of the collection, creating the new display every Monday of fifteen items, photographing the works, and posting to the Tumblr. It’s a fairly simple process, so now almost anyone who works in the library can continue the weekly changes.

Artists'-Book Showcases
Artists’-Book Showcases

ArLiSNAP: Do you have any advice for someone looking to apply to the Banff Centre Library, or things to do while working there?

JF: I’d advise anyone interested in working with an outstanding artists’ books collection to apply. It is truly an amazing collection that I feel so lucky to have worked with every day. I know I’m a great deal more knowledgeable about artists’ books than I was before working at the Centre. Working at The Banff Centre is very special because artists across media from around the world come to make and show work. I encourage any future library work study to go to every show, performance, artist talk, party, dinner, bingo night, hike, and outing possible. There is a lot to experience in a very short time.

Applications for the Library Work-Study are due on June 15th!

Interview: Life as The Banff Centre’s Library Work-Study

For those of you thinking about spending six months in gorgeous Banff, Alberta (yes, international applicants are encouraged!):
Here are some words of wisdom from last year’s Library Work-Study, Jaye Fishel, who spent her tenure working to promote and display the Banff Centre’s insane collection of artists’ books. Jaye kindly answered my questions about being an American book-nerd in Alberta, the projects she worked on, and the application procedures to get into one of Canada’s prettiest cultural institutions.

The Banff Centre Library
The Banff Centre Library

ArLiSNAP: Can you start with a bit of your background?

Jaye Fishel: I was an artist before I got my MLIS degree, which I in-part pursued to professionalize my interest in artists’ books in particular. I worked in the rare books library during my undergraduate studies (at Emory University) and was introduced to artists’ books in processing collections. That led me to move to San Francisco in 2005 to study at the Center for the Book there, where I learned letterpress printing and other techniques. Since then, I’ve expanded my artistic repertoire but books and works on paper still figure largely into what I’m interested in engaging with, both professionally and as an artist.

ArLiSNAP: What were you doing previous to taking the work-study position?

JF: I was living in Oakland, unable to find a professional position suitable for me. I only realized after graduating with my MLIS that any job, let alone a job dealing with artists’ books, was very difficult to come by.

ArLiSNAP: What was the application process like?

JF: The application process was straightforward — I submitted a project proposal in addition to a standard cover letter that outlined a project I would produce while at the Centre. Since the work-study position is an educational program, like an internship, I stated some learning objectives. Applying to work in Canada from the US seemed to have little bearing on the application process, although once I accepted the position, I had to secure a student visa, which did not show up until the day before my flight to Banff, causing more than a little anxiety.

ArLiSNAP: A student visa?

JF: I needed a student visa because the work-study program is considered an educational program, so technically I was a student in the eyes of the Canadian government. Work-study participants receive a stipend, not a salary, and are generally treated differently than staff at the Centre.

ArLiSNAP: What attracted you to the position?

JF: The job description was like a dream! Working fairly exclusively with the artists’-books collection in an international art residency centre? I was attracted to everything about that. Plus, I needed a change in my life, so I felt ready to move to remote Banff from the Bay Area, which was changing rapidly before my eyes into a place that felt less and less accommodating to artists and craftspeople. I was also attracted to the adventure.

ArLiSNAP: What period of time were you there? What was it like moving to Banff and settling in?

JF: I arrived in Mid-May and I left at the end of February, so I was there for nine months. It was an adventure the entire time — living in the middle of the Canadian Rockies in an art residency center was unlike my life in the Bay. I hadn’t lived through a snowy winter since I was a child, so that was definitely an adjustment, as was living in a very small tourist town. I had a sometimes quiet, simple existence — sometimes filled with lots of art and parties and people from all over the world.

ArLiSNAP: What was a typical work day like?

JF: I worked four days a week, nine to five, with one day away from the library to work on outside research or projects. Typical days usually included working on artists’-book catalog records, planning upcoming events, and working with patrons. Then I’d walk home and see at least one deer or elk, on average.

ArLiSNAP: You started a few neat initiatives while you were there. Can you tell us about getting those programs going?

JF: I had a lot of freedom to create new initiatives and work on a variety of projects. The bulk of what I did at times was cataloging, or improving the very basic cataloging of the artists’ books collection, which is extensive at over 4,300 items. I would pull items from a particular press or artist at once to make comprehensive improvements to parts of the collection that relate to one another. I also initiated a public program series of artists’ books showcases, where I would pull random items from the collection and invite the resident artists and the public to engage with the items. I also started a several-year-long project to display every item in the artists’ books collection in a case in the library, as well as online via documentary images. (http://banffcentrelibraryandarchives.tumblr.com/)

I had wonderful support from my mentor, Suzanne Rackover, to do whatever I wanted with my time to enhance use of the collections. So I just came to her with my ideas and she supported my process. For the artists’ books showcases, I would loosely try to pull items that would be of interest to visual artists on residencies. I would make sort of weird promotional fliers and hand them out and post around campus. Setting up the Tumblr project required simply creating a randomized spreadsheet of the collection, creating the new display every Monday of fifteen items, photographing the works, and posting to the Tumblr. It’s a fairly simple process, so now almost anyone who works in the library can continue the weekly changes.

Artists'-Book Showcases
Artists’-Book Showcases

ArLiSNAP: Do you have any advice for someone looking to apply to the Banff Centre Library, or things to do while working there?

JF: I’d advise anyone interested in working with an outstanding artists’ books collection to apply. It is truly an amazing collection that I feel so lucky to have worked with every day. I know I’m a great deal more knowledgeable about artists’ books than I was before working at the Centre. Working at The Banff Centre is very special because artists across media from around the world come to make and show work. I encourage any future library work study to go to every show, performance, artist talk, party, dinner, bingo night, hike, and outing possible. There is a lot to experience in a very short time.

Applications for the Library Work-Study are due on June 15th!

Job Posting: Librarian, Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham AL

BIRMINGHAM MUSEUM OF ART

 

Title:               Librarian

Status:            Full time

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

The Birmingham Museum of Art seeks an experienced Librarian, who will be responsible for all aspects of the Library’s management. The Clarence B. Hanson, Jr. holds more than 35,000 titles and is among the most comprehensive art research libraries in the Southeastern United States. The Library holds a broad range of research materials including general art reference works, auction catalogues, artist files, periodicals, indexes, exhibition catalogs, and databases.

 

The Birmingham Museum of Art has a collection of more than 26,000 objects within six collecting areas: Africa and the Americas, American Art, Asian Art, European Art, European Decorative Arts, and Modern and Contemporary Art. The BMA provides inspirational cultural and educational art experiences to diverse communities while constantly evolving and enhancing our visitors’ interactions with our Museum and interests in the visual arts.

 

 

TO APPLY

 

For more information and to apply on line go to http://www.artsbma.org/opportunities/librarian/

 

Review of applications will be ongoing until the position is filled.

The Birmingham Museum of Art is an equal opportunity employer.

Internship Posting: Archivist/Librarian Internship at Dumbarton House

Dumbarton House, a Federal period historic house Museum in Georgetown, seeks an Archivist/Librarian Intern to work with the rare book and manuscript collection during the fall 2011.

Dumbarton House, headquarters of The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America, offers visitors an opportunity to enhance their appreciation of early American history. Dumbarton House strives to inform and educate the public, about life in Washington during the early days of the Republic (circa 1800) and about Federal Period decorative arts and architecture.

Dumbarton House’s collection of decorative and fine art consists primarily, but not exclusively, of objects dating from the Federal period of U.S. history (approximately 1790-1830). The Dumbarton House manuscript and book collection includes an original copy of the Articles of Confederation, as well as papers, journals, account books, ledgers and letters documenting nearly 300 years of Nourse family life. In addition to our permanent exhibition, we also offer a series of temporary exhibits that feature topics relevant to the museum. The Archivist/Library Intern works directly with and reports to the Museum Curator.

The fall 2011 intern will work closely with the rare book and manuscript collection, re-housing, conditioning, numbering, scanning, and assisting with accessioning the over 1000 pieces in the manuscript collection as well as the nearly 150 rare books.  

Working with the Museum Curator and the Collections Assistant, the intern will be responsible for ensuring that the manuscript and book collection is stored, handled, and cared for according to museum standards.  The Archivist/Library Intern will write a policy and procedures document outlining best practices in care, handling, and storage of the collection.  In addition, the intern will prioritize the conservation needs of this specific collection.   Finally, the intern will assist in moving this collection forward to become accessible online along with aiding in the process of making the museum’s research library of roughly 1,000 books accessible online.

The internship program is designed to provide practical, hands-on experience to students pursuing a graduate-level or PhD degree in Library Sciences, American History, Museum Studies, Material Culture Studies, or related field. Applicants with a recent degree, working toward a degree, and/or comparable work experience will be considered. Applicants must be able to work independently with minimal supervision, and be willing to assist with all aspects of working in a small, historic house museum.

Schedule

  • Available 8-12 hours/week for a total of 150 hours over the course of the semester.

 Responsibilities

The Archivist/Librarian Intern will:

  • Propose, research, develop, and write procedures for the care of the rare book and manuscript collection
  • Scan and condition report manuscript collection
  • Re-house those pieces that are not currently housed properly
  • Assess conservation needs of collection and create a priority list
  • Catalogue, condition report, and accession Rare Book Collection
  • Create online catalogue of current research library for public access

Requirements

  • Excellent organizational skills and attention to detail;
  • Excellent research and written and oral communication skills;
  • Familiarity with proper terminology in field and a particular interest in the Federal period a plus;
  • The ability to work both independently and as part of a team;
  • Experience with MS Office applications (Word and Excel), knowledge of databases and office equipment;
  • Experience with Past Perfect 4.0 and 5.0 a plus; and
  • Strength, dexterity, and mobility to perform all duties.

Academic credit may be arranged in cooperation with a sponsoring college or university. A stipend may be available.

To Apply

  • Send position-focused cover letter, resume or CV, and 2 professional/academic references to:Archivist/Librarian Intern c/o Education Director, 2715 Q Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20007-3071;education@dumbartonhouse.org;  FAX: 202-337-0348.
  • Qualified applicants will be contacted to schedule an interview. Please do not contact Dumbarton House to inquire about your application status.

For more information about the Museum and our programs, please visit www.DumbartonHouse.org

Job Posting: Cataloger/Librarian at the Brooklyn Museum

BROOKLYN MUSEUM LIBRARY POSITION                                             

POSITION :    Cataloger/Librarian 

DEPARTMENT : Libraries/Archives 

REQUIREMENTS : M.L.S./MSLIS,  extensive experience with library automated systems especially Millennium and OCLC Connexion. Experience with cataloging research materials related to art history.

RESPONSIBILITIES: Conduct search of items in the Institutional Files and in the Archives to ascertain rarity and to catalog these publications on the item level (original or copy cataloging). Focus will be on publications on Brooklyn art or artists. Authority work and data cleanup will be involved.

Salary: Commensurate with experience.

Schedule: 7-14 hours a week within a Monday through Friday 9 – 5 schedule

August – October 2011

Deadline for applications: July 29th, 2011

Please send cover letter and resume to: 

job.pt.cataloger@brooklynmuseum.org

Applicants for positions at the Brooklyn Museum are considered without regard to race, creed, color, country of origin, sex, age, citizenship, disability, marital status or sexual orientation.  Candidates of color are strongly encouraged to apply.  The Immigration and Control Act (1986) requires that all hires be in conformity with the law.