Job Posting: Visiting Visual Resources Collection Curator, College of Fine and Applied Arts, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Visiting Visual Resources Collection Curator, College of Fine and Applied Arts, University
of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

The Visiting Visual Resources Collection (VRC) Curator will manage a College-wide key teaching
resource serving faculty in Art History, Architecture, Landscape Architecture and other FAA units.
The FAA VRC Curator will oversee the acquisition, processing and cataloguing of digital images
for FAA faculty’s teaching and research needs; maintain course web sites; and supervise
graduate assistants and part-time student workers. The VRC Curator will coordinate with the
University Library’s Visual Resources Coordinator and will participate in the University Library
group that is implementing ArtSTOR’s “Shared Shelf” platform on this campus.

Responsibilities:
1. Develop and maintain collections: In consultation with faculty, the Curator will continue
the VRC’s transition to digital images and will coordinate with the University Library
regarding campus-wide metadata standards.
2. Provide end user support: Train, assist and troubleshoot for faculty in the use of ArtSTOR
and other digital image databases.
3. Oversee course web sites: In consultation with faculty, organize and regularly update
course web sites.
4. Contribute to campus ARTstor “Shared Shelf” initiative: Coordinate with University
Library’s Visual Resources Coordinator, and other staff and faculty supporting visual
resource collections and services, to configure this platform for diverse user groups on
campus.
5. Technology Liaison: Work with FAA academic units and University Educational
Technology office to establish and coordinate effective hardware and software support for
teaching with digital images.
6. Visual Resources Professional Activity: Maintain active involvement in relevant
professional groups such as VRA, ARLIS/NA in order to keep abreast of developments in
the field of Visual Resource management

Qualifications:
Master’s degree in art history, architectural history, library science, or related field. Expertise in
digital image collection, production, and management, including thorough knowledge of digital
imaging, scanning and correction, web-design (HTML and XML), PowerPoint, copystand
photography. Proficiency with ArtSTOR including its Offline Image Viewer (OIV). Familiarity with
metadata standards such as VRA Core 4.0, data content standards such as Cataloging Cultural
Objects (CCO), and controlled vocabularies such as the Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus,
Union List of Artist Names, Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names. Strong computer skills with
proficiency in Microsoft Office and database applications. Excellent interpersonal and
communication skills. Demonstrated organizational abilities and attention to detail. Ability to work
independently and as a team member and to effectively delegate and supervise others. Prior
experience managing digital visual resources to support use in an academic or research setting.
Knowledge of European or Asian languages desirable.
This is a full-time, visiting position (may become regular position at future date). Salary is
commensurate with qualifications and experience. Start date is negotiable.

Application materials
To ensure full consideration, applications must be received by January 8, 2010. Please create
your candidate profile at http://jobs.illinois.edu and upload a cover letter, resume and full contact
information for 3 references to:
The University of Illinois is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. The administration,
faculty, and staff embrace diversity and are committed to attracting qualified candidates who also
embrace and value diversity and inclusivity.

Link: https://jobs.illinois.edu/default.cfm?page=job&jobID=1284

For more information contact:
Prof. Lisa Rosenthal, Chair
VRC Curator Search
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
School of Art and Design
143 Art and Design Building
408 East Peabody Drive
Champaign, IL 61820
lrosenth@illinois.edu

http://vraweb.org/jobs/12.16.09_Vanderbilt.pdf

Surviving the Presentation

For our discussion topic this week, I’d like to tackle an issue that’s likely on the minds of many ArLiSNAPers these days: giving an effective presentation during a job interview.

I work at the University of Michigan Library, and we’re currently in the process of filling a large number of librarian positions.  For nearly all of the positions, a presentation is a required part of the interview process.  I’ve spent the last few weeks going to a staggering number of candidate presentations.  I’ve seen bad ones, good ones, and great ones.  Here are a few thoughts I’d like to share:

  1. Even if you’re not on the job market, go to these presentations anyway.  They’re often open to library staff or other members of the community, and they can give you a sense of what to expect.  Even if they’re for positions outside of your subject area, you can still gain valuable tips for success.
  2. If you’re the candidate, try to find out beforehand where you’ll be giving the talk, who will be there, what technology will be available, etc.  Knowing these things up front can help make your presentation better by allowing you to tailor it to your audience and venue.
  3. Employers often give you a topic to address.  If you don’t understand what you’re being asked to talk about (for example, the topic is long, rambling, and appears to have been picked by a large committee with conflicting interests), don’t be afraid to ask for clarification.
  4. While keeping this topic in mind, think about the purpose of the presentation.  Do they want you to demonstrate your skill as an instructor?  Knowledge of particular resources?  Critical thinking about an issue that’s important to the profession?  Use this thought exercise as a way to guide your choice of presentation style and content.
  5. If you’ll be using PowerPoint, Keynote, or other presentation software, take some time to look at the work of Edward Tufte, particularly The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint.  Think about how you can avoid presenting your audience with nothing but bullet points and copious amounts of text.  We are art librarians, after all!
  6. If you’ll be demonstrating a particular resource (particularly electronic resources like ARTstor, the Avery Index, an OPAC, etc.), make sure you know it extremely well, including all of its potential quirks.  Be prepared to soldier on (while remaining calm!) if something goes wrong.
  7. Practice your presentation!  Get feedback from peers, mentors, supervisors, etc.  Practice some more!
  8. Be prepared for at least one completely off the wall question during the Q&A afterward.  Don’t let it rattle you.  The same goes for hard questions you’re not able to answer.  Don’t be afraid to say, “Can I think about that for a minute?”
  9. Remember that the presentation is only one part of the much larger interview process.  Don’t limit your prep work to the presentation and then completely blow it on the search committee interview.
  10. Let your personality show through!  You’re funny, personable, and a great conversationalist, right?  Then don’t act like a robot when you get up in front of the audience.

Have other questions or advice about surviving the presentation?  Comment away!

Subject Experts Need Not Apply

From the The Chronicle of Higher Education, Chronicle Careers, July 1, 2008:

Recent job postings and hires suggest that many academic libraries are losing interest in hiring humanities Ph.D.’s

By TODD GILMAN

Job candidates with M.A.’s and Ph.D.’s in the humanities have become increasingly drawn to the idea of earning a master’s in library and information science (MLIS) and pursuing careers as academic librarians. Read more