Job Posting: Museum Specialist (Art), National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

APPLICATION CLOSES FRIDAY, JUNE 24

The incumbent writes and manages interpretive content, and contributes design and digital platform expertise, for key parts of the Education Division’s section of the website-including collection, NGA Classroom, and Learning Resources pages; various digital application projects; online features and tours; associated partnerships (Google Art); and other projects related to the Gallery’s permanent collections and exhibitions, as assigned.

Writes, updates, adapts, and promotes NGA Classroom and NGA Learning Resources materials.

Works to improve accessibility and availability of these resources­ both through online and lending/circulation outlets, and raises the profile of these resources with regular and new audiences.

Contributes his/her art historical and digital media expertise to write, adapt, and update educational materials for the department’s website assets and other digital publications related to the permanent collections and exhibition initiatives, as assigned.

Collaborates with curators, DEP, and digital outreach staff to create and shape educational content for multiple platforms.

Handles project tracking of the department’s digital initiatives, to include development of spreadsheets or databases as required, and with other staff, identifies and acquires resources including, but not limited to, images and image reproduction rights as part of his/her work on print, media, and web projects.

On an ongoing basis, the incumbent evaluates the use of educational resources and activities on the NGA website.

Conducts analysis of web logs and other survey sources to determine statistics and patterns of visitor use regarding website traffic and distribution of publications.

Applies analysis and innovation to improve systems whenever possible and makes recommendations on potential projects.

Produces status reports for the department (and division head) as requested.

Contributes to the strategic planning for DE media initiatives by researching trends and reporting on museum and education websites and search functions.

Coordinates workflow with DPUB staff, and ensures that the content of all media projects reflects current scholarship and Gallery style.

Coordinates web revisions on an ongoing basis to preserve the freshness and accuracy of the department’s digital and media publications.

Contributes to other department and division projects as requested and assigned.

More information and application: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/441361500/

Job Posting: Administrative and Curatorial Assistant, Ryerson University, Toronto

http://current.ischool.utoronto.ca/jobsite/2014/administrative-and-curatorial-assistant

The Ryerson Image Centre (RIC) is an international centre of excellence at Ryerson University, dedicated to the public exhibition, research, study and teaching of photography and related disciplines, including new media, installation art and film.

To ensure the efficient operation of the unit, we are currently seeking an Administrative and Curatorial Assistant to provide administrative and curatorial support to the Director, Ryerson Image Centre (RIC). This position will support the Director in the research, writing, and editing of essays, fundraising proposals, speeches, press and advertising materials, and other forms of written communication designed to build the profile and reputation of the Ryerson Image Centre and generate public interest. The successful candidate will also support and coordinate the Director’s relations with RIC staff, the Provost’s Office, the RIC Advisory Committee and Sub-Committees, University partners and stakeholders, and fundraising prospects, collectors, and professional colleagues. The selected candidate will also assist in the planning and coordination of RIC programs and events in support of exhibitions, collection, and research.

Qualifications:

•Successful completion of a post-secondary degree program in Art History or related discipline is required, with a specialization in history of photography, cultural management/administration, history, literary studies or visual arts. With a minimum of three (3) years of relevant administrative work experience, preferably within the setting of a cultural institution. Experience coordinating various activities, and conducting research, writing and editing is required. An equivalent combination of education and experience may be considered.
•Demonstrated experience providing front of the house administrative support in order to carry out complex administrative tasks such as developing and implementing internal administrative processes and guidelines to facilitate efficient operations.
•Excellent written communication skills are required in order to draft and edit curatorial and scholarly texts, essays, speeches, media releases and advertising materials in support of the director.
•Strong analytical and financial skills in order to monitor and review revenues and expenses, as well as identify and investigate any discrepancies or trends and recommend actions to address variances accordingly.
•Excellent organizational skills are required in order to assist the Director in managing interaction, reporting and relations with the Office of the Provost and Vice President, Academic, Office of the President, and other significant University partners such as colleagues, Advisory Committees and Sub-Committees.
•Demonstrated experience in event planning in order to support the Director’s fundraising activities as well as coordinate gallery functions such as receptions and other public and private events.
•A demonstrated commitment to client service, specifically students, staff, faculty and external contacts. Excellent interpersonal and technical skills required when assisting students and faculty and when assisting in the production of special events and centre initiatives.
•Working knowledge and demonstrated experience with various software applications (Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint). Experience with ORACLE would be considered an asset.
•Ability to work independently with minimal supervision using sound judgment, excellent creative skills as well as utilizing problem solving/troubleshooting skills to identify and find solutions to administrative issues and conduct post-activity assessments in order to identify opportunity areas for development.

Additional information :

•Candidates may be asked to demonstrate qualifications through occupational testing as a first step in the evaluation process prior to being granted an interview.
•Candidates must have a demonstrated record of dependability/reliability and a commitment to maintain confidentiality.

Ryerson University is strongly committed to fostering diversity within our community. We welcome those who would contribute to the further diversification of our staff, our faculty and its scholarship including, but not limited to, women, visible minorities, Aboriginal people, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity. Please note that all qualified candidates are encouraged to apply but applications from Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

Application deadline:

Aug 25 2014

Interview: Starting a Student Chapter

We’ve talked before about the value of having professional-association student chapters on campus, whether it’s just general awareness of career options and extracurriculars or the impact on your resume of helping to manage and plan events, fundraisers, field trips, etc. There are no ARLIS/NA student chapters (yet), but that doesn’t mean you can’t start one! (I guess ArLiSNAP is sort of your virtual student chapter.)

During my MLIS these past two years, I watched some fellow McGill students start up a student chapter of the Association of Moving Image Archivists. As media preservation is a pretty important topic to arts-librarianship students, I thought I would ask a few questions about the process, the need, and the benefits of bringing special-interest representation to your school. Justin Mckinney kindly agreed to answer my questions about his work founding the chapter.

(Photos by Fiona Mak.)

Film handling workshop with George Eastman House
Film handling workshop with George Eastman House
George Eastman Film Handling Workshop
George Eastman Film Handling Workshop

ArLiSNAP: Let’s start with student chapters generally – were you members of other student chapters to start?

Justin Mckinney: During my first year of library school, I was a member of the Association of Canadian Archivists student chapter at McGill. I started out keen and not knowing what I was doing and imagining all the great things we would accomplish, but nothing really happened all year and I wasn’t exactly as active as I could have been.

ArLiSNAP: What’s the value of having local representation of professional associations?

JM: I think it has the potential to help raise awareness about the organization. Also, it can educate student members about issues in the field and maybe even lead to practical opportunities to do stuff. I think it probably varies from year to year and association to association, and is really dependent on the group of people involved at any given time.

ArLiSNAP: Why the Association of Moving Image Archivists specifically?

JM: I became really interested in film history and film preservation after my undergrad, which led me down the path to library school. I was already an AMIA member before starting library school, and my main interest in the archivy/LIS world was and is film preservation. After a sort of underwhelming experience of my first year at library school (which included a complete absence of film archiving content), I was determined to take more of an active role in my own learning. Fortunately, I had a couple of great friends in the program who had similar interests and were very supportive, and it snowballed from there.

ArLiSNAP: What was the process for starting a student chapter?

JM: I started emailing (and harassing) the fine people at AMIA about how to start a student chapter and they explained what was needed, which was mainly a constitution and that the executive members all be members of AMIA. They put me in touch with the folks at the NYU AMIA student chapter, and they were kind enough to send me their constitution, which I basically amended to change any mention of NYU to McGill — from there, we were off and running.

As for McGill, I just emailed people at the School of Information Studies (SIS) and let them know what I was doing and they got us a table at the student chapter fair at the start of the school year. Throughout the year they were generally helpful about any questions I had and they also helped us get connected with the Masters of Library and Information Science Student Association (MLISSA), and the Post-Graduate Student Society (PGSS), which both provide funding for SIS student groups.

In general, though, it was mostly a lot of me emailing and badgering people and then getting information as needed. It’s not really a clear process to setting up a chapter, and I think it would be beneficial if there were more guidance or upfront information given about the process of starting one.

In regards to gauging student interest, we really had no idea what would happen. To start it was just the executive (myself, Mark Haydn as vice-president, and Nicholas Avedisian-Cohen as secretary and treasurer). My main goal was to make the student chapter viable enough for someone to take over for a second year, once we all graduated. At the aforementioned student chapter fair, we were pleasantly surprised to get over 20 students to sign up for our email list, and we held our first meeting, which had over ten people, including first- and second-year students. This was a pleasant surprise and I think demonstrated that many people are interested in the field and also frustrated with the lack of film/media archiving content in library school.

The main paperwork was getting the constitution ratified. We also had to apply for funding for various events through PGSS and MLISSA. A lot it was just learning on the fly, as none of us had ever done anything like this before. So it involved a lot of asking questions of people at McGill and AMIA, and remaining persistent.

Probably the biggest challenge was forging a relationship with the Moving Image Research Laboratory (MIRL) at McGill, a research project which houses a wonderful cinema space and collection of 16mm films. Pretty much all of the Fall 2013 semester was spent sending emails, stalking professors, and showing up unannounced, just trying to get our foot in the door. Finally in January, we got access and that proved to be our greatest success, as it allowed us to start handling film, cataloguing the collection, and providing real hands-on experience in the field.

ArLiSNAP: You also organized a one-day symposium, which brought in guest speakers and gave students a chance to present their research. Why did you choose a symposium as your first event? How did that organizational process work?

JM: Technically, our first event was a field trip to the National Preservation Centre at Library and Archives Canada in Gatineau. We had 20 people come along and we got a great tour of the facilities there, and met a bunch of professionals in the field. Mark Haydn and I also attended the AMIA Conference in 2013 and met a bunch of the students at the Eastman House in Rochester, NY. Thanks to these friendships, we were able to organize a trip down there as well, where we got to tour their facilities and participate in a film-handling workshop.

As for the symposium, I heard that all the other groups were doing one, so we just copied them. The process of organizing it wasn’t that difficult. We booked the space at SIS and just sent out a call for papers and presentations to members of our email list. I also contacted David Stevenson, the conservator at the Canadian Centre of Architecture, whom I met on a class field trip, about presenting. I also contacted Phil Spurrell, the proprietor of CineClub Film Society, who I’ve known for several years and volunteered with. He is very knowledgeable about the medium of film and had a lot of interesting experiences working with film.

ArLiSNAP: Have you found someone to hand off the reins to? Do you have any thoughts on the sustainability of the group, long-term?

JM: One of the really encouraging things about our membership was that we had a lot of first-year students who were incredibly eager and motivated. So by the time we started cataloguing the MIRL collection, we were regularly getting 15 to 20 people out to volunteer. So we knew we had a solid base of people who might be able to take over next year. From there, we asked for nominations and were able to come up with a four-person executive committee for another year.

My hope is that some of the connections we made with the folks at LAC, and the folks at Eastman House, will continue and allow for more educational opportunities and networking. Also, the MIRL collection is really outstanding and needs a lot of work to catalogue, plus the cinema space allows for screenings and projections of the collection. This hands-on practical experience is invaluable and I think should be a major factor in the success of the group long-term.

ArLiSNAP: Do you have any ideas or recommendations about how to improve LIS curricula to contain more of the useful things your AMIA chapter is trying to do? Or do you think it’s better off as extracurricular activity?

JM: I feel like the major deficit of the MLIS program is the lack of hands-on experience of working with materials regardless of type. Particularly in the archival end of things, where the theoretical felt very abstract and weird to me. I found my understanding only started to come together through some of the volunteering I was doing at the Jewish Public Library Archives, where I was handling documents, creating finding aids, and writing accession numbers on folders.

Obviously, because of the broad focus of the program, it would be hard to have a dedicated film archiving course, but it is certainly something that could be touched on. Maybe a course dealing directly with the preservation of objects, rather than the theoretical preservation of objects would be useful.

Unfortunately, I think everything is becoming so focused on digital objects and becoming “information specialists” to the detriment of acquiring actual tangible physical skills, which I fear is leaving a lot of graduates ill-equipped to manage the physical aspects of library and archive work. Maybe it’s for the better, as having a broader and more transferable set of skills could help grads deal with the job market, but I can’t help thinking something valuable is being lost in the transition.

AMIA Montreal Meets AMIA Rochester
AMIA Montreal Meets AMIA Rochester in New York

We’d love to hear about your experiences with professional associations, and if you’re thinking about starting a student chapter at your school (ARLIS/NA or otherwise). It’s not too late to plan something for the coming school year. Let us know in the comments!

Survey: Canadian LIS students, grads, and hiring staff on transition to academic librarianship

Please check out the following survey and see if you qualify! The research is on MLIS students, recent graduates, and hiring librarians and managers at Canadian academic institutions. (This is reposted from a listserv.)

Dear LIS colleagues,

 

This email is to invite you to participate in a research study exploring the transition between LIS education and employment in academic libraries.

 

Our study seeks to examine how students are prepared for and what challenges exist when transitioning from LIS to a career in academic librarianship. Our findings will help contribute to Canadian LIS literature and provide recommendations to LIS programs and employers to help support the successful transition from school to employment.

 

The survey will remain open until July 28, 2014. Please distribute this email widely.

 

Eligible participants include:

·         Current students enrolled in a Master of Library and Information Studies, or directly equivalent, program at a Canadian university. Students can be pursuing part-time or full-time studies. Participants in this category must have completed approximately 50 percent of their program and have an intention or interest in pursuing a career in academic librarianship.

·         Recent graduates who have completed a Master of Library and Information Studies, or directly equivalent, program at a Canadian university within the last year (graduated no earlier than April 2013) and are actively seeking employment at a Canadian academic library.

·         New professionals who have completed a Master of Library and Information Studies, or directly equivalent, program at a Canadian university within the last three years (graduated no earlier than April 2011). Participants in this category are recent graduates who are currently employed full- or part-time, either on a permanent or contract basis, at a Canadian academic library.

·         Hiring managers or librarians who participate in hiring committees at any Canadian academic library, in any discipline, on either a contract or permanent basis. Librarians involved in other elements of the hiring process and supervisors of new professionals are also encouraged to participate.

 

If you have any questions, please, contact either Laura Thorne by phone at (250) 807-9107 or by email at laura.thorne@ubc.ca or Catherine McGoveran by phone at (613) 562-5800 ext. 2725 or by email at catherine.mcgoveran@uottawa.ca.

 

Survey data is being collected via Verint, a survey tool provided by UBC IT. Verint is a Canadian-hosted survey solution complying with the BC Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. All data is stored and backed up in Canada.

 

This study is being conducted in English; however, should a participant require assistance to participate, the researchers will endeavour to provide this assistance wherever possible.

 

When completed, the researchers will seek to publish the results of the study. If you would like a copy of the research findings, please send a request to either Laura Thorne by phone at (250) 807-9107 or by email at laura.thorne@ubc.caor Catherine McGoveran by phone at (613) 562-5800 ext. 2725 or by email at catherine.mcgoveran@uottawa.ca.

 

To participate in our study, please follow the link: http://www.surveyfeedback.ca/surveys/wsb.dll/s/1g336c

 

Thank you for your support,

Laura Thorne & Catherine McGoveran

 

Laura Thorne

Learning Services Librarian, UBC Okanagan Campus Library

The University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus

(250) 807-9127

laura.thorne@ubc.ca

 

Catherine McGoveran

Bibliothécaire spécialisée en information gouvernementale / Government Information Librarian

Centre d’information GSG Information Centre ; Bibliothèque Morisset Library

Université d’Ottawa / University of Ottawa

(613) 562-5800 ext./poste 2725

catherine.mcgoveran@uottawa.ca

Young Canada Works Jobs for Canadian Students

Young Canada Works. Despite its faults*, it’s a beautiful initiative: government funding for cultural heritage organizations to give summer employment to students and new professionals. Here’s a selection of arts-related YCW positions across Canada, from curation and conservation to research and events planning (with varying application deadlines):

Registration / Conservation Assistant at the Vancouver Art Gallery (Vancouver, June 9 – August 29, $21.20/hr)

Curatorial Assistant at the Delta Museum and Archives Society (Delta, BC, May 27 – August 23, $14.10/hr)

Collections Management and Curatorial Research Intern at Gallery 1C03 (Winnipeg, starts May 20, $15.14/hr)

Curatorial Assistant in Copyright Research, Photography, and Art Museum Tours at the RiverBrink Art Museum (Queenston, ON, June 3 – September 1, $12/hr)

Visitor Services Offer at the Museum of Inuit Art (Toronto, 16 weeks, $11/hr)

Student Archival Project Assistant at the McGill University Music Library (Montreal, May 5 – August 1, $12.36/hr)

Student Assistant at the Canadian Architecture Collection at the McGill University Library (Montreal, 13 weeks, $12.36/hr)

Gallery and Events Assistant at the Cape Breton University Art Gallery (Cape Breton, June 16 – August 29, $11.50/hr)

 

 

* Faults: Low pay, short contracts, administrative difficulties for participating institutions, and plenty of restrictions on eligibility for both institutions and participants.

The restrictions for the summer-jobs program are here: be under 30 years of age, be in between full-time post-secondary semesters. Here’s the master-list of job postings, if you’d like to search by location (there are many other curatorial positions in museums and archives, if you’re okay with a history/anthropology focus).

Alternatively, the Internships for Graduates program restrictions are here: be under 30, have graduated within the last 24 months, and be otherwise unemployed or underemployed. And here are the job-postings for this qualification: many start later in the year, if you’re like me and don’t plan to graduate until August.

Sunday Soliloquies #1

I hope “Soliloquy” is a misnomer for a discussion blog, but it does alliterate well with “Sunday”, right?

By this point in Fall semester 2013, I hope those of us in graduate school have gotten into somewhat of a routine and are conquering the wonderful world of art librarianship one assignment, presentation, group project and term paper at a time! This is my first semester of classes at University of North Texas’s MLIS program and I was a bit worried that my time management skills would be put to the test early and I might give up on this before I really got started. So far, so good though, and honestly, I am loving it! I am one of those folks who has come to art librarianship by a circuitous route.  How about you? I wonder how many of us ArLiSnappers were born with a burning desire for this career path or did you sort of discover it along the way? So, basically, why are you doing this? What are your degrees and in what order did you pursue them? What were the influential factors in your life that led you to this point? Did you attain your advanced degrees concurrently or spread them out? What do you see as the benefits and/or drawbacks to the degrees you have and/or are working on? For those new professionals with degrees in hand, do you see yourself returning for a PhD? Or do you already have one? Discuss!

Educational Opportunities!!!

 

Lots this week! Let’s start with the one that happens tomorrow:

 

LYRASIS Ideas & Insights Webinar

Join us for our upcoming LYRASIS Ideas & Insights<http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001wCQICMGo7AWgGpHKHAUJbkAv_Ah2nboVNI-UWKPZJAPpze3PnLinLO67Lga2TY4lHvX2IpRSMrpXQu8KzxX-H6-xtZc34cSlmhtanK2OXSuZqyLnrlgvAkNQsYfIdVod-5Ud9npxR1yOuj0F3VWWPDt5YYtP2Nn8yLRcPkuLj1s=> webinar, Libraries are Boundless<http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001wCQICMGo7AWgGpHKHAUJbkAv_Ah2nboVNI-UWKPZJAPpze3PnLinLO67Lga2TY4lHvX2IpRSMrpXQu8KzxX-H6-xtZc34cSlxrw2Prfvym6JfjqEpJ-21hVhSqfAIvkelP00Y-6-hl6MnhrOPXNjsGkzSsRcEW0-sGic_8En9xYjM-JGC3RA4XbUnd5RP2QfLaNLbMzgLpM=
> and hear how information organizations are challenging traditional ideas about space in libraries, and placing collections, staff and resources in the best possible position to meet user needs – in the cloud, in the digital realm, on site and online – into the future.

Libraries are Boundless<http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001wCQICMGo7AWgGpHKHAUJbkAv_Ah2nboVNI-UWKPZJAPpze3PnLinLO67Lga2TY4lHvX2IpRSMrpXQu8KzxX-H6-xtZc34cSlxrw2Prfvym6JfjqEpJ-21vh9PpD1BSYOXcdnPztwK6y1C91kkkXMsfLjUaYAUOhKf4Wu0RMfp7JruiRuymVSb1rNrzX72hyanmAfxzSTTAk=>
June 15, 2012
11 a.m. – 4 p.m. ET

Click here to register<http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001wCQICMGo7AWgGpHKHAUJbkAv_Ah2nboVNI-UWKPZJAPpze3PnLinLO67Lga2TY4lHvX2IpRSMrpXQu8KzxX-H6-xtZc34cSlxrw2Prfvym6JfjqEpJ-21gnDBS_4yvLljnPqKUdbUg-XV0iqH51ZrQSTrtejc9RK1JPGVCSDNqpm_WV2OfGRCRROq6tRRet7uiU95OU-u7U=>

Speakers include:

*   Stacie Ledden and Logan Macdonald, AnyThink Libraries, Rangeview Library District, CO: Creating an Experience Library
*   Chad Nelson and Barbara Petersohn, Georgia State University: The Care and Feeding of Digital Collections
*   Dr. Curtis R. Rogers, State Library of South Carolina: Social Media, Libraries, and Web 2.0: How American Libraries are Using New Tools for Public Relations and to Attract New Users

New Book Information Literacy Beyond Library 2.0

CHICAGO — In the three years since the publication of the best-selling “Information Literacy Meets Library 2.0,” the information environment has changed dramatically, becoming increasingly dominated by the social and the mobile.

The new book “Information Literacy Beyond Library 2.0” picks up the conversation, asking the big questions facing those who teach information literacy: where have we come from, where are we now, and where are we going.

Presenting answers from a range of contributors, editors Peter Godwin and Jo Parker divide their book into three distinct sections. Part 1 explores the most recent trends in technology, consumption and literacy, while Part 2 is a resource bank of international case studies that demonstrate the key trends and their effect on information literacy, offering numerous innovative ideas that can be put into practice. Part 3 assesses the impact of these changes on librarians and what skills and knowledge they must acquire to evolve alongside their users.  Among the key topics explored are:

  • The evolution of “online” into the social Web as mainstream;
  • How social media tools are used in information literacy;
  • The impact of mobile devices on information literacy delivery;
  • Shifting literacies, such as metaliteracy, transliteracy and media literacy, and their effect on information literacy.

Anyone charged with developing and delivering information literacy programs, as well as library professionals concerned with library instruction and digital technologies, will find the information in this book stimulating and useful.

Godwin is academic liaison librarian at the University of Bedfordshire, UK and Parker is the head of information literacy at the Open University Library, UK.

Source and Fulltext Available At

[ http://ref-notes.blogspot.com/2012/06/new-book-information-literacy-beyond.html ]

 

Registration is now open for the 2nd Annual Summer Retreat for Librarians at Chapman University’s Leatherby Libraries!

Date: Friday, June 29, 2012
Time: 9am – 3pm
Place: Chapman University’s Leatherby Libraries in Orange, California Website (for more information and to register): http://www1.chapman.edu/library/teaching/
Vision: The summer teaching retreat at Chapman University’s Leatherby Libraries was created to build community amongst instruction librarians and library school students from Orange County and the surrounding areas. The retreat provides unique and practical presentations. Participants have opportunities to share teaching experiences, ideas, and resources during lively break-out sessions as the practices and innovative ideas of local librarians are discovered. Ideally, participants leave the retreat with a larger network of resources and contacts, as well as inspiration to creatively expand their library instruction repertoire.
Retreat Schedule and Presentation Descriptions: http://www1.chapman.edu/library/teaching/schedule.html

The deadline to register is June 15. Registration will be capped at 80 participants and is on a first-come-first-serve basis.

Please direct questions on registration to Wenling Tseng at tseng@chapman.edu or 714-532-7720.

General questions on the retreat may be directed to Annie Knight (aknight@chapman.edu  or 714-532-7736) or Stacy Russo (russo_stacy@sac.edu or 714-564-6712).

 

International Conference on Trends in Knowledge and Information Dynamics
10-13 July, 2012

Hosted by
Documentation Research and Training Centre (DRTC)
Indian Statistical Institute (ISI)
http://drtc.isibang.ac.in/ictk

Venue: NIMHANS Convention Center, Nimhans Hospital Premises, Hosur Road,
Bangalore- 560029

Documentation Research and Training Centre (DRTC) established by Prof. S R
Ranganathan in 1962, is a research centre at Indian Statistical Institute (ISI)
conducting Research, Training and Higher Education in the field Library and
Information Sciences  and allied  areas. In the last five decades, DRTC has
been involved in Research, Education, Training and cutting edge applications of
Information and Communication Technology to Libraries and Information Centres,
Knowledge centers and systems. 2012 marks the Golden Jubilee of DRTC and we are
happy to host as part of ‘Golden Jubilee Celebrations’, the ‘International
Conference on Trends in Knowledge and Information Dynamics’ (ICTK-2012).

Broadly the themes of the conference are divided into main streams (in parallel
sessions on all the days of the conference):
Stream 1: Trends in Library Education and Research
Stream 2: Trends in Public Library Services
Stream 3: Trends in Domain Specific Information Systems and Services
Stream 4: Trends in Open Access to Information and Data
Stream 5: Trends in ICT applications to Library and Information Science
For details visit us on  http://drtc.isibang.ac.in/ictk/subthemes

ICTK 2012 includes sessions of invited talks by renowned in the field of
Library and Information Science from around the globe on various topics related
to the above mentioned five streams covering various aspects of current
interest and popular trends. The conference serves as an International
Platforms for dissemination of information of International research and
collaborative projects such as European Commission infrastructure projects.
Experts Panel on Open Access to Information and Public Libraries present
experts’ views from around the world. In addition to plenary spearker of
International repute, we plan to have panel discussions on Higher Education and
International Collaborative Research in LIS, Public Libraries, Agricultural
Information Systems, Open Access to Information

List of invited speakers

Dr. Jagdish Arora
INFLIBNET
India

Dr. Roberto Barbero
INFN
Italy
Dr. Donatella Castelli
CNR-ISTI,
Italy

Prof. Fausto Giunchiglia,
University of Trento
Italy
Dr. Johannes Keizer
UN-FAO
Rome

Prof. Dr. Norbert Lossau
Goettingen State and University Library
Germany
Dr. Alberto Masoni
INFN
Rome

Dr. Carlos Morais Pires,
European Commission,
Brussels
Dr. Federico Ruggieri
INFN
Rome

Dr. Alma Swan
Key Perspectives Ltd,
Truro, UK
Prof. Anna Maria Tammaro
University of Parma
Italy
Dr. Stuart Wiebel
Senior Research Scientist, OCLC
USA

Last date of registration : 30 June 2012
Details of registration  at http://drtc.isibang.ac.in/ictk/registration

Contact

Prof. A.R.D. Prasad (Convener – ICTK-2012)
Documentation Research & Training Centre (DRTC),
Indian Statistical Institute (I.S.I),
8th Mile, Mysore Road, R.V. College Post,
Bangalore – 560 059, Karnataka INDIA
Phone: +91-80-2848 2711
Fax : 91-80-2848 4265
E-mail ID: ictk2012@drtc.isibang.ac.in

 

Registration closes on Sunday, June 17 for the next offering of RUSA’s online course “Introduction to Spatial Literacy and Online Mapping”.

This asynchronous course will run June 18-July 8.
Group registration rates are available for 2 or more registrants from the same library, library system or network–more information here: http://www.ala.org/rusa/development/onlinece

Register online now for this class: http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=oloc&Template=/Conference/ConferenceList.cfm&ConferenceTypeCode=L

This three week course will introduce students and library staff to a variety of mapping tools and GIS technologies that are of interest to both public and academic library users. Librarians will be able to apply their newly developed Web 2.0 mapping skills in their reference work, and liaison responsibilities. Through hands-on exercises, demonstrations and presentations, the librarian will receive a thorough overview of GIS-related technologies that they may be exposed to in the library.

Instructor: Eva Dodsworth, geospatial data services librarian at the University of Waterloo Map Library in Waterloo, Ontario

Questions about registration? Contact registration@ala.org or 800-545-2433, option 5. Questions about the course? Contact RUSA Web Manager Andrea Hill at ahill@ala.org.

 

RUSA 101 Online

Are you interested in any of the following?

Frontline reference

Readers advisory

Collection development

Emerging technologies in reference

Specialized business reference

Genealogical research

Managing local history collections

Interlibrary loan and resource sharing

Reference and outreach to special populations

If you said YES to any of the above, there’s a place in RUSA for you!

Find out more about RUSA, the Reference and User Services Association, at RUSA 101.
You’ll learn about what RUSA and its sections do, how to get involved, how to stay informed in our activities, and get any of your RUSA questions answered.
RUSA 101 Online
No registration required! Feel free to drop in to any of the sessions below.
Access information can be found at the bottom of this email.
·         Friday, June 1, 10:00am-11:00am PT/12:00pm-1:00pm CT/1:00pm-2:00pm ET
·         Wednesday, June 6, 1:00pm-2:00pm PT/3:00pm-4:00pm CT/4:00pm-5:00pm ET
·         Monday, June 11, 10:00am-11:00am PT/12:00pm-1:00pm CT/1:00pm-2:00pm ET
·         Friday, June 15, 1:00pm-2:00pm PT/3:00pm-4:00pm CT/4:00pm-5:00pm ET
·         Monday, June 18, 10:00am-11:00am PT/12:00pm-1:00pm CT/1:00pm-2:00pm ET
RUSA 101 @ ALA Annual 2012
No registration required! Besides having an opportunity to learn more about RUSA and meet RUSA members, we’ll have raffle prizes!
·         Friday, June 22, 2012 || 3:00pm -4:00pm
Hilton Anaheim – Oceanside Room
Access Information for RUSA 101 Online
To get the most out of your web conference experience, it is best to use a headset. If you do not have a headset, please use headphones/earbuds to plug into your speaker. This will eliminate audio issues.
Session URL: https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?password=M.F71930E6E64800139C18D122D0C4DD&sid=2011689

 

ALA Conference Mentors and Mentees

For mentees:

Calling all students, new professionals, and first time ALA Annual Conference attendees! Would you like to meet with an experienced ALA conference representative while attending your first ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim, CA? If so, The New Members Round Table (NMRT) of ALA is sponsoring a conference mentoring program that will pair new attendees with people who have attended more ALA Annual Conferences.

Please fill out the following questionnaire to participate. A member of the NMRT Mentoring Committee will be in touch with information about your match. It is up to you to connect with your match and set up time(s) to meet while at the conference.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dDZSQTFIUWZvQWtnaHlJOFFYX3ZhdEE6MQ#gid=0

Questions? Email: NMRT_Mentoring@yahoo.com

For mentors:

Have you attended a couple of ALA Conferences and want to give back to the next generation of librarians? If so, The New Members Round Table (NMRT) of ALA is sponsoring a conference mentoring program that will pair new attendees with people who have attended more ALA Annual Conferences.

Please fill out the following questionnaire to participate. A member of the NMRT Mentoring Committee will be in touch with information about your match. It is up to you to connect with your match and set up time(s) to meet while at the conference.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEhhMWhJVkZmWnVzQmk2b1ZZbGcwUGc6MQ#gid=0

Questions? Email: NMRT_Mentoring@yahoo.com

 

IMHO > Two *Most Excellent* Keynotes from the recent IATUL conference in Singapore

1 >  Libraries, Technocentricity and Learning : Changes in Learning, Research and Information Needs and Behavior of Users

Prof. Rakesh Kumar (The University of New South Wales, Australia)

http://ref-notes.blogspot.com/2012/06/libraries-technocentricity-and-learning.html

2 > Technology & Innovations in Libraries and Their Impact on Learning, Research and Users

Joe Murphy (Librarian, Trend Spotter / Trend Setter & IMHO: Librarian Extradordinaire)

http://ref-notes.blogspot.com/2012/06/iatul-keynote-2-technology-innovations.html

BTW: There was a 3rd Keynote titled _Trends, Possibilities and Scenarios for User-Centred Libraries_ by Dr. Susan Gibbons, University Librarian, Yale University, but there is a known problem with the A/V [:-(]

Note-1: Each A/V link also links to the video poster sessions …

and

Note-2: Each post includes links to other presentation / sessions titles and speakers …

How are libraries using both physical and virtual spaces to meet the needs and demands of library users?

Libraries are changing from spaces where we “marc and park” volumes of print material into more vibrant and vital organizations that focus on both internal and external access to services and information.

 

ShareAcademy

The 3rd annual ShareAcademy will be held on Tuesday, August 7th, 2012 at the CPCC Harris campus in Charlotte, NC.  The theme for this year’s ShareAcademy is:

“Under New Management: Adventures in Leadership”

2nd CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Share with us your challenges, joys, reflections, techniques, skills and eye-opening moments about becoming a better, more efficient, more productive leader and manager.  What habits or tricks have you learned or utilized to manage yourself, your time or your staff?  How have you identified your strengths and skills and used them to your best advantage?
Workshop proposals are expected to be interactive, hands-on, and engaging for participants.

Call for proposals CLOSES: June 22
ShareAcademy Registration OPENS: June 26

*ShareAcademy is created and hosted by CPCC Library, but is open to anyone interested in the conference theme.  Our primary goal is to provide a conference full of practical, hands-on material for its attendees.*

Submit your proposal here!  http://www.cpcc.edu/library/shareacademy

ARLIS/NA Reviews

The coeditors for ARLIS/NA Reviews (http://www.arlisna.org/pubs/reviews/index.html) are seeking reviewers for the September/October 2012 edition.

You must notify one of the coeditors by no later than Friday, June 15 of your interest in reviewing one of the titles listed below.  Please note in your response if your subject background or expertise matches the subject matter of the book.  Also, you must be able to meet an August 3, 2012 deadline with a 450 word review.

How a Revolutionary Art Became Official Culture: Murals, Museums, and the Mexican State,by Mary K. Coffey

Iroquois Art, Power, and History, by Neal B. Keating

Replacing Home: From Primordial Hut to Digital Network in Contemporary Art, by Jennifer Johung

Spatialities: The Geographies of Art and Architecture, ed. by Judith Rugg and Craig Martin

Doug Litts & Terrie Wilson
littsd@si.edu / wilso398@mail.lib.msu.edu
ARLIS/NA Reviews Co-Editors

 

CHArt 28TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE
Consume: Respond – Digital Engagement with Art
**The CHArt committee has extended the deadline for proposals to June 20, 2012.

 

 

Thursday 15 – Friday 16 November 2012, Central London venue TBC

Since its foundation in 1985 CHArt has engaged in topical issues in
Digital Art History. This year CHArt is looking at how new developments in information and communications technology affect the ways in which we engage with art. New forms of digital display or emerging modes of viewing art may have profound effects on both our understanding of the artwork itself (the way we consume it) and our ability or appetite for describing, curating and managing it (how we respond to it).

CHArt invites papers that examine emerging practice and where it impacts upon digital art practice, research and curation. Areas for consideration include:

* Control of authorship, ownership and access
* Collaboration and the interdisciplinary break-down
* Participation, quick response and interaction
* Consumption, re-use and mashup
* Mobile technology, apps and education
* Connections between art, interface design, usability and user experience
* Globalisation, agility, dissemination and big data
* Liquidity and permeability of digital culture

Contributions are welcome from all sections of the CHArt community: art historians, artists, architects and architectural theorists and historians, philosophers, curators, conservators, scientists, cultural and media theorists, archivists, technologists and educationalists.

Submissions should be in the form of a 300-400 word synopsis of the proposed paper with brief biographical information (no more than 200 words) of presenter/s, and should be emailed tochart@kcl.ac.uk<mailto:chart@kcl.ac.uk > by Friday, June 1st
Wednesday, June 20th 2012. Please note that submissions exceeding the stated
word count will not be considered.

Postgraduate students are encouraged to submit a proposal. CHArt is able to offer assistance with the conference fees for up to four student delegates. Priority will be given to students whose papers are accepted for presentation. An application form and proof of university enrolment will be required. For further details about the Helene Roberts Bursary please email anna.bentkowska@kcl.ac.uk<mailto:anna.bentkowska@kcl.ac.uk >.

CFP: Digital Frontiers

The deadline for submissions for Digital Frontiers – a conference and THATCamp for and about the diverse communities using digital tools for research, teaching, and learning – is fast approaching. Please send us proposals for individual papers, fully-constituted panels, posters, and THATCamp workshops! (Apologies for cross-posting – we’re just really excited to see your submissions!)  Check out the CFP below or visit https://digitalfrontiers.unt.edu

The University of North Texas Libraries and The Portal to Texas History invite proposals for Digital Frontiers, a conference on using digital resources for research, teaching, and learning.

Digital libraries provide unprecedented access to a wide array materials. This has dramatically expanded the possibilities of primary source research in the humanities and related fields. We seek submissions of individual papers, fully-constituted panels, workshops or posters based on research using digitized objects, whether they are hosted on the University of North Texas Libraries’ Portal to Texas History or are from other digital repositories.

We encourage contributions from scholars, educators, genealogists, archivists, technologists, librarians, and students. The goals of this conference are to bring a broad community of users together to share their work and to explore the value and the impact that digital resources have on education and research.
Possible Topics

•     Specific ways digital libraries have impacted research
•     Digital tools for conducting research – data and text mining, data
visualization
•     Using digital collections in K-12, undergraduate, and graduate
curricula
•     Using digital libraries for research on any of the following topics:
African-American history / Asian-American history / agriculture and animal husbandry / cartography, mapping, and GIS / civil rights movements / Civil War / collaboration in public humanities projects / electronic and born-digital art / feminism and women’s issues / genealogy and family histories / history and digitization of regional newspapers / history of religions and religious institutions / immigration and migration / Latino/a & Chicano/a histories / local history / LGBT history / military and veteran’s history / digital resources in museums and libraries / music recordings and performance / myths, urban and local legends, and folklore / Native American history / oral histories and personal narratives / photography and visual arts / regional authors / slavery and abolition / state and local politics / Texana and regional literature /

Proposal Types
Digital Frontiers is accepting proposals for:
•     Individual papers (20 minutes)
•     Panels (75 minutes – 3 individual papers + discussion)
•     Roundtable discussions (75 minutes – 5-7 speakers + discussion)
•     THATCamp workshop or tutorial (2 hours)
•     Poster (36” x 48”)

Submissions

•     E-mail proposals or inquiries to digitalfrontiers@unt.edu
•     Abstracts should be no more than 250 words in length; proposals for
fully constituted panels or roundtables should include abstracts for each presentation.
•     Please provide a brief professional bio and specify any A/V or other
technical needs with your proposal.

Conference Deadlines

•     June 15, 2012: proposals due
•     June 30, 2012: notification of acceptance
•     September 21, 2012: Conference
•     September 22, 2012: THATCAMP

Internship postings: Ringling Museum of Art

Ringling Museum of Art

Summer Internships 2012

Overview

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida, will be offering five paid internships to be held for ten weeks, from May 21– July 27, 2012. The Ringling is part of Florida State University and serves as the State Art Museum of Florida.  Located on a 66-acre site overlooking Sarasota Bay, it consists of an art museum, circus museum, historic home, theater and research library.  The internships are in the following departments:

  • Collections Management
  • Curatorial (Modern and Contemporary Art)
  • Education
  • Library
  • Marketing and Communications
  • Historic Asolo Theater

Summer internships at the Ringling combine practical, hands-on experience working on a project for a specific department with exposure to all aspects of the museum’s operation.

Interns earn $11.25 per hour (less taxes) and are paid bi-weekly. Interns are responsible for their own housing (the Museum will assist with locating nearby rentals).

Candidates must be graduating seniors or current graduate students. International students must have a current US Visa and be eligible to work in the US.  The positions require fingerprinting.  The Museum encourages students from all backgrounds to apply and is committed to a culturally diverse group.

Application materials can be found on the Museum’s website at http://www.ringling.org/Opportunities

The application deadline is March 23, 2012.

 

Position: Collections Management Intern

Department: Collections Management

Responsibilities: Work with TMS (the museum’s collections database) updating records for the Asian collection, Cypriot collection, photography collection, circus collection etc.; assist with digitization and other projects as needed

Qualifications: Graduate student with a museum studies, art history, history or library science background

Position: Curatorial Intern (Modern & Contemporary Art)

Department: Curatorial (Modern & Contemporary Art)

Responsibilities: Research the photographers represented in a large donation of 20th-century European and American photographs, for the purpose of proposing temporary exhibitions and permanent collection installations

Qualifications: Masters degree in art history with a concentration in photography; doctoral student preferred

Position: Education Intern

Department: Education

Responsibilities: Participate in the activities of the Education Department; assist with research and development of adult programs and family activities; help to facilitate the museum’s summer youth program; contribute to docent training and evaluations Qualifications: Strong research and communication skills; good working knowledge of art history; K-12 classroom or other experience with children

Position: Library Intern

Department: Library
Responsibilities: Participate in the activities of the Ringling Museum Library; work on the museum object files digitization project, including cataloguing, editing, scanning and entering data into TMS (the museum’s collections database), ContentDM and other internal databases; work on social media applications and collection development

Qualifications: Bachelors degree in art history or related field; current enrollment in an ALA-accredited MLS program with an interest in special and/or research libraries

Position: Marketing Intern

Department: Marketing and Communications

Responsibilities: Capture and post videos/photography of events and happenings around the Ringling Estate; design flyers and other promotional materials as needed

Qualifications: Video, editing and graphic skills; degree in graphic design, film and/or animation preferred

Position: Technical Production Intern

Department: Historic Asolo Theater (HAT)

Responsibilities: Work closely with the Technical Director in pre-load-in preparation, load-in, and technical/dress rehearsals for the summer circus production in the Historic Asolo Theater; work with performers to maintain production integrity and smooth day-to-day operations, including the run of the show

Qualifications: Degree in theater (recently completed); minimum of two years technical theater experience

Note: The circus performances in the HAT are held twice a day, Wednesday thru Sunday, for six weeks (closing July 29).  Each performance lasts approximately one hour.