Job Posting: Digital Collections Assistant, Ringling College of Art & Design, Sarasota, FL

Job Summary/Basic Function

Ringling College of Art and Design seeks an enthusiastic and creative Digital Collections Assistant (Library Technician III) for the Brizdle Schoenberg Special Collections Center at the Alfred R. Goldstein Library. The newly created Center has a collection of rare books and facsimiles with an emphasis in art, design, and architecture; a diverse survey of artists’ books; and a teaching collection of digital images. The Digital Collections Assistant will work closely with the Digital Curation and Special Collections Librarian to support the digital initiatives and daily activities of the Center.

The Digital Collections Assistant will participate in project planning, software evaluation, and digital preservation initiatives; develop a workflow for a wide range of digital projects; improve accessibility to the digital image collection including metadata creation; scan or photograph artists’ books for a visual discovery system; help create and preserve new digital assets, and contribute to online exhibitions and web-based bibliographies. The Assistant will also play a valuable role in the day-to-day activities of the public reading room, providing research and reference services and serving as the Special Collections Center supervisor in the absence of the Librarian.

The successful candidate will have experience or formal training in the development of digital collections; some experience working in an archives, special collections department, or museum; some knowledge of digital preservation; and some experience with content management systems and digital repositories. The ideal candidate will have a strong customer service orientation, a willingness to work in a team atmosphere, and excellent organizational skills. Knowledge or interest in visual resources and artists’ books a plus.

Minimum Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s degree in design, studio, art history, media arts, or related discipline
  • Expertise using both MAC and PC platforms
  • Expertise using photo editing and photo management software
  • Familiarity with scanning and photographic equipment
  • Ability to work well both independently and as part of a team
  • Ability to plan, implement, and assess work responsibilities
  • Excellent interpersonal, analytical, communication, and organizational skills
  • Ability to carefully handle rare, fragile, and mixed format archival materials

Preferred Qualifications

  • Master’s degree in Library or Information Science or coursework or experience working in an archives, special collections department, or museum
  • Experience or formal training in the development of digital collections
  • Knowledge of digital preservation
  • Experience with content management systems and digital repositories
  • Knowledge of bibliographic conventions, and experience searching online catalogs
    or databases

Special Instructions to Applicants: Open until filled. For full consideration apply by January 8, 2016.

Full post: https://ringling.simplehire.com/postings/1489

Job Posting: Associate Archivist and Lead Digital Archivist, The Frick Collection, NYC

Background
The Frick Collection is an art museum consisting of more than 1,100 works of art from the thirteenth to the nineteenth century, displayed in the intimate surroundings of the former home of Henry Clay Frick. The residence, with its furnishings and works of art, has been open to the public since 1935. The Frick Art Reference Library is an internationally-recognized research library that serves as one of the most complete resources for the study of Western art. Founded in 1920, the Library today holds more than one million study photographs, 285,000 books, 80,000 auction catalogs, and 2,250 periodical titles. It is open to interested individuals from all over the world.

Summary and Responsibilities
Major job responsibilities include administration of our born-digital institutional records preservation program, development and implementation of policies and procedures for the stewardship of born-digital institutional records, and managing software and storage solutions needed to preserve and provide access to digital records. Participate in the management of the institutional records management program, including meetings with records holders and regular review of records schedules. Accession and process institutional records and manuscript collections, prepare access tools such as finding aids and catalog records, and create and edit metadata. Respond to reference inquiries. Improve visibility of and access to collections through digital initiatives and collaborative platforms. Participate in the rotation of coverage in the Library’s Reading Room, and represent the department at professional and institutional meetings and activities as necessary. This position interacts frequently with the institution’s Technology and Digital Media Department and Digital Lab, and participates in activities of the Social Media Committee.

Qualifications
MLS or MA with concentration in Archives, Records Management or Digital Collections. Experience working with digital assets or electronic records, databases, information architecture and digital archive workflows. Experience with ArchivesSpace and Preservica preferred. Knowledge of best practices and policy development associated with electronic records as demonstrated by achievement of the Digital Archives Specialist certificate from the Society of American Archivists or other training specifically geared towards management of electronic and digital assets. Experience processing archival collections and creating finding aids and MARC records. Excellent oral, written, and interpersonal communication skills. Physical requirements include: Ability to lift forty pounds to the waist.

To apply, please send resume with salary requirements to:

Chief, Archives and Records Management
The Frick Collection
1 East 70th Street
New York, NY 10021
Fax: 212-861-7347
Email to jobs@frick.org

No phone calls please.

If you are interested in any of the positions, please send your résumé, a cover letter indicating the position for which you are applying, and salary requirements to the appropriate person listed in the announcement, or follow the instructions in the job posting.

Full post: http://www.frick.org/careers/associate_archivist_and_lead_digital_archivist

Job Posting: Digital Collections Coordinator (PT, Temp), Woodruff Arts Center, Atlanta, GA

High Museum of Art
Digital Collections Coordinator (Temporary/Part-time)
Department: Photography/Collections
Reports To: Keough Family Curator of Photography & Head of Collections
Employment Status: Temporary/Part-time

POSITION SUMMARY:
The Digital Collections Coordinator will manage all photographic and technology requirements for a one year collections digitization initiative funded by the Woodruff Arts Center.

WORK SCHEDULE:

  • Part-time, Monday – Friday with flexible hours as determined by the photography schedule
  • Limited to one year term starting from hire date

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES include the following:

  • Collections Management:
    • Work with the Images & Rights Coordinator to schedule and manage photo shoots to produce high-quality digital images and video of artworks in the High Museum of Art’s permanent collection
    • Create shoot lists and plan a year-long schedule for the project
    • Work with Associate Collections Manager and Preparators to arrange movement of art work for photography, and return art to home locations afterwards
    • Work with Curators to identify priorities for the digitization project
    • Fact-check object data in collections management system and make corrections and/or updates as directed by the curator and/or registrar, according to style guidelines provided.
    • Assist photographers during shoots, including some art handling
    • Organize and archive new digital assets and ensure accuracy of metadata
  • Administrative:
    • Manage and track spending and project budget under the oversight of the Associate Collections Manager and Image & Rights Coordinator
    • Prepare and submit payments for invoices related to the project
    • Prepare periodic updates on project progress to be presented to project managers in curatorial, interpretation, and registration departments
    • Manage monthly meetings with all necessary Digitization project staff; Arrange meetings as necessary

QUALIFICATIONS:
To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential duty satisfactorily. The requirements listed are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability required. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.

  • Education and Experience:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Familiarity with digital and analog image formats and technology is critical
    • Familiarity with photography equipment (cameras, lights, backdrops) preferred
    • Working knowledge of museum cataloging systems with a strong preference for experience with The Museum System (TMS)
    • Familiarity with collections management best practices
    • Experience in an art museum or gallery performing tasks that include art handling and collections management
    • Knowledge of art history helpful
    • Highly proficient with MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook (email/scheduling) and similar databases and digital imaging technology, including Photoshop. Training on TMS will be provided.
    • Must be well-organized and detail oriented.
  • Language Skills:
    • Excellent written and oral communication skills.
    • Ability to write professional correspondence.
    • Ability to communicate effectively with museum staff and other professional affiliates
  • Mathematical Skills:
    • Experience in bookkeeping preferred.
    • Ability to maintain project files, keep budget, and process invoices.
  • Reasoning Ability:
    • Ability to solve practical problems and prioritize needs in a variety of situations where standardization is limited and immediate decisions are necessary.

PHYSICAL DEMANDS/WORK ENVIRONMENT:
The work environment and physical demands described here are representative of those that must be met by an employee to successfully perform the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions: Some standing, walking, bending, frequent use of hands, stooping and light lifting (at least 10 pounds) is needed; the noise level in the work environment is usually moderate.

Full post: http://www.woodruffcenter.org/HRJobdetails.aspx?jobid=1849

Job Posting: Collections Information Specialist, Detroit Institute of Arts

The Collections Information Specialist will be responsible for verifying, refining, and updating information in electronic object records; proofreading and correction of existing records, and the vetting of associated digital imagery for works in the DIA collection.

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS

  • Verifies information in and adds appropriate metadata to existing electronic object records
  • Refines information in existing object records, including enhancement of key word functions and the reformatting bibliographical and citation references in TMS, the DIA’s collection information system
  • Reviews paper object files and incorporates appropriate information into the electronic collection record
  • Works with staff in curatorial, registration, and conservation departments to verify, refine, or update object information
  • Keeps the TMS manual up to date

QUALIFICATIONS

  • B.A. degree in library science, art history, museum studies, or other relevant field required; M.A. preferred
  • Museum experience preferred, including experience with The Museum System (TMS) or another collections management system
  • Experience with databases and digital asset management systems a plus
  • Highly detail-oriented
  • Familiarity with at least one foreign language
  • Demonstrated research skills
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills, including proofreading
  • Excellent organizational abilities
  • Ability to multi-task in a fast-paced work environment, and to work effectively with cross-disciplinary teams
  • Knowledge of MS Office suite of programs preferred

Deadline to apply: July 29, 2016

Full post: http://www.dia.org/employment/1899/Collections-Information-Specialist.aspx

Job Posting: Digital Collections Librarian, Swarthmore College, PA

Description
Swarthmore College is a highly selective liberal arts college located in the suburbs of Philadelphia, whose mission combines academic rigor with social responsibility. Swarthmore has a strong institutional commitment to inclusive excellence and nondiscrimination in its educational program and employment practices and encourages candidates who will further advance the goal of fostering a diverse and inclusive community. As one of the nation’s finest institutions of higher learning, Swarthmore College is global in outlook and draws students from around the nation and world. The 425acre campus is a designated arboretum, complete with gardens, rolling lawns, a creek, wooded hills, and hiking trails in the Crum Woods.

As a member of the Digital Initiatives and Scholarship Department, the Digital Collections Librarian will provide strategic and innovative leadership for the burgeoning digital asset management and preservation program of the Swarthmore College Libraries. The Digital Collections Librarian will be responsible for the planning, operations, and management of this program, and will manage the lifecycle of our digital assets and projects, from the acquisition or creation of digital objects to their long-term preservation. In collaboration with the College’s special libraries and/or TriCollege colleagues, s/he will develop and implement strategies, best practices, policies, and processes to support the access, management, and preservation of our analog-to-digital and born-digital assets. The Digital Collections Librarian will also play a vital role in collaborative processes to evaluate, select, and implement software solutions that support our digital assets.

S/he will develop our digital collections by identifying materials currently held in our physical collections and/or by reaching out to campus constituencies. S/he will work directly with members of the campus community to identify potential projects and to contribute materials appropriate to our collections. S/he will work with subject librarians and faculty to support teaching, research, and scholarly activities which integrate the Libraries’ digital collections, and may provide instruction on topics such as personal digital archiving and preservation best practices. Perform other duties as assigned.

Qualifications
Required Education and Experience:

  • Master’s degree from an ALA-accredited program.
  • 2 years’ experience working with digital collections or archives.
  • Experience working with digital asset management, digital repository, and/or digital library systems (e.g. DSpace, Fedora, CONTENTdm).
  • Equivalent combination of education and experience may be considered.

Required Skills and Abilities:

  • Knowledge of digital preservation systems, standards, best practices.
  • Ability to work independently and collaboratively.
  • Ability to work effectively in teams that encompass a range of roles and knowledge.
  • Flexibility, intellectual curiosity, and willingness to take initiative.

Preferred:

  • Demonstrated experience in managing digital collections projects.
  • Understanding of archival theory and best practices as they relate to the processing and management of digital collections.
  • Experience with tools used to capture, manage, and deliver born-digital materials
  • Ability to analyze a range of tools and technologies, and to implement those which improve workflows, access, or preservation of digital objects.
  • Strong decision-making and project management skills.

More information and application: https://www.higheredjobs.com/search/details.cfm?JobCode=176256852&Title=Digital%20Collections%20Librarian

Job Posting: Part-Time Digital Collections Content Coordinator for Decorative Arts and Design, Dallas Art Museum, TX

Scope of the Position:
The Dallas Museum of Art seeks a Digital Collections Content Coordinator for a 20 hour per week, grant-funded position.  This position will be a temporary role with the museum through November 30, 2016, subject to change with prior notification from the museum.  Working as a part of the Digital Collections Content Team under the leadership of the Interpretation Manager, the Digital Collections Content Coordinator is responsible for producing digital collections content focused on our Decorative Arts and Design collection that reflects the highest standards of quality and scholarship while remaining accessible to a broad public audience both online and in the galleries. Using tools created by the DMA’s software and technology teams, the Digital Collections Content Coordinator will create, digitize, and aggregate content to support the interpretation and understanding of art works from the Museum’s permanent collection and long-term loans.

Working closely with the Collections Database Registrar, the Digital Collections Content Coordinator will also review collections metadata records to improve the quality and consistency of collections metadata across the permanent collections in accordance with best practices in the field for collection cataloguing.

DMA Mission:

The Dallas Museum of Art is both a responsible steward of cultural heritage and a trusted advocate for the essential place of art in the lives of people locally and around the globe. The DMA is transparent, ethical, and takes informed risks. It promotes research, dialogue, and public participation, helping to reveal the insights of artists from every continent over the last 5,000 years.

Essential Functions:

  • Digitize, aggregate, and author digital content in support of the DMA’s Decorative Arts and Design collection and in order to ensure quality and consistency of collection content.
  • Review of object metadata in the Museum’s collection management system (TMS) by checking facts, validating consistency, and verifying primary image selection.
  • Collect data and information from verifiable sources related to DMA artworks.
  • Take direction from the Interpretation Manager in order to achieve the critical aspects of an interpretive strategy that fulfills the needs of the DMA’s online collection.
  • Work with DMA’s Collection Database Manager and Imaging Department to ensure that collections data and images are consistent, accurate, and complete whenever possible.
  • Work closely with DMA Curators under the leadership of the Interpretation Manager to ensure that digital collections content reflects the highest standards of quality and scholarship.
  • Participate in ongoing evaluations that integrate visitor research and evaluation into the design and development of digital interpretive content for the permanent collection.
  • Collaborate with Editorial staff and follows house style in all written materials.

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:

  • Master’s Degree in Art History or related field required.
  • Knowledge of and/or experience in decorative arts and design or American art required.
  • Experience working in a museum setting in a curatorial, education, or digital media role desired.
  • Excellent writing and strong research skills; strong digital content skills and experience using web tools preferred.
  • Prior experience in meeting strict deadlines under limited supervision preferred.
  • Excellent interpersonal and communication skills required.
  • Proven ability to work productively within a team required.

More information and application: http://chc.tbe.taleo.net/chc01/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=DMA&cws=1&rid=318

Hack Your MLIS Program: Visual Resources Librarianship

Hi Arlisnappers! After a yearlong absence, I am back on the blog as a feature post writer and excited to be a part of the ArLiSNAP team once again. I recently graduated with my MLIS and I currently work as the Director of Visual Resources at the University of Georgia.

In April 2014, I shared my tips for hacking your MLIS program to focus on art librarianship. Now I’m back with a better-late-than-never follow-up on how I hacked my MLIS program to prepare for my career in visual resources librarianship. We have discussed how to plan your coursework so you are prepared to manage digital collections before, and this post will focus specifically on what you need to manage visual resources collections.

Visual Resources Center, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia. Image courtesy of Courtney Baron.
Visual Resources Center, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia. Image courtesy of Courtney Baron.

What is visual resources librarianship?

Visual resources librarianship is a bit different from art librarianship, though the two fields require similar skills and educational backgrounds. I have worked as a full-time visual resources professional for one year now, so I have a good idea of what the profession involves and what is required to do the job successfully. That being said, each position is unique depending on the needs of the institution. Visual resources professionals historically functioned as slide librarians, usually in art/art history departments or libraries. Now, we primarily manage digital image collections, though slide collections still exist at many institutions, and assist faculty and students with their image needs. We may also manage public visual resources spaces that range from digital scanning and projects labs to libraries with circulating materials.

Become involved in VRA

The Visual Resources Association (VRA) is smaller than ARLIS, but equally as welcoming. Hands down, this is the best way to get – and stay – connected to the field, especially if you are one of the few people in your program interested in art and visual resources librarianship. Not only do you have access to a large network of art and visual resources professionals, but you can also follow news, concerns, and trends on the VRA listserv. I encourage you to be active on the listserv as well since name recognition can help you in your job search later on! Seriously – my predecessor was very active, and I get asked about him all the time. If you have been involved with ARLIS but haven’t yet ventured into VRA, there is a joint conference next year in Seattle, WA, so it will be an opportune time to check out both organizations and annual conferences. There is also a similar group to ArLiSNAP called vreps – visual resources association emerging professionals and students – that you should join. The VRA Bulletin is the journal of the association and each issue contains a wealth of information about current issues and practices in the field.

Focus coursework and projects on visual resources topics

As I said in part one, the best way to ensure you are getting a similar education to a MLIS program that does offer an art librarianship track is to see which courses they require and which electives they offer. I also recommend looking at similar tracks, such as digital content/asset management or archives. I recommend courses on the following topics, since they relate to visual resources: humanities information services, digital libraries, descriptive cataloging and metadata, database design, digital humanities, and digital archives. Basically, looks for classes that focus on metadata, technologies, databases, and managing or curating digital archives, libraries, and other collections. These classes will give you an overview of the information you need and you can focus your projects and papers specifically on arts and humanities topics.

Independent study

In part one, I discussed an independent study on art and visual resources librarianship that I designed as an elective in my MLIS program. If you would like more information on that, I’m happy to share my syllabus and course projects in a later post.

This time, I’m focusing on what you can do independently outside of coursework to build some of the skills you need to work in visual resources.

Photography, Photoshop, and Lightroom 

Knowledge of photography, especially editing software, is very helpful for managing image collections. I still have a lot to learn about photography, but I have heard that ShootFlyShoot has fantastic photography classes. Why is this important? So you understand how the images you work with are produced, and you can produce images if required. Some visual resources positions require original photography of works of art, either from works in museum or galleries, or from faculty and student work. I do not produce original photography in my current position, but I do a lot of scanning, and knowledge of photographic editing techniques is essential. I use Adobe Photoshop, and recommend Photoshop Classroom in a Book to learn the basics of using Photoshop. The book has a disc with tutorials and sample images to practice editing. Adobe Lightroom is a simpler and easier way to edit images and is preferred over Photoshop by some visual resources professionals.

Metadata

Just like a library book would be lost without a catalog record, images would be lost without good metadata. I believe that metadata is perhaps the most important part of managing image collections. After all, what’s the point of having a collection if your content cannot be easily found? Just as there are cataloging standards and formats for cataloging books, archival materials, etc., these also exist for visual resources collections. Cataloging Cultural Objects (CCO) is a content standard for visual resources collections (comparable to RDA) and VRA Core is a metadata schema used to describe images (comparable to MARC). If you have access to Adobe Bridge, you can download the VRA Core panel and practice creating metadata for images. It’s also essential to be familiar with the Getty vocabularies, which are now available as Linked Open Data. The vocabularies will give you the structured terminology for art, architecture, and other materials and are essential tools for the proper cataloging of images.

Image resources

Working in visual resources doesn’t just mean managing image collections. There is a reference and instruction component. You must be able to help others find and locate images using subscription databases, institutional image collections, and free resources on the web. The most popular subscription database for images is Artstor Digital Library. If the institution where you attend school or work does not have a subscription, you can still check out the website or YouTube videos to learn more about how the database works and how to use it. There is a section with free guides, including subject-specific guides, and studying these is an excellent way to increase your knowledge of this resource.

Visual resources professionals manage institutional image collections or archives. These collections can include images from faculty and student image requests, images from digitized slides, images purchased from vendors, and images related to institutional history. In order to properly manage these image collections, you need to know how digital asset management systems work. A broad knowledge of DAMs is important, because there are many different systems out there. The most popular DAMs for visual resources include Artstor’s Shared Shelf, Luna Imaging, and Madison Digital Image Database (MDID). These can be high cost for some institutions, so in-house solutions are also popular.

You also need to know how to locate high-quality and accurate images on the web. Libguides are an excellent way to compile these resources, and many institutions have great libguides on locating images for you to browse and study. My personal philosophy behind libguides, or curating image resources in general, is this: quality over quantity. Your job isn’t to know all instances of where to find images of the Mona Lisa. Your job is to know where to find the best images of the Mona Lisa.

Copyright and fair use

You also need to know how the images you manage, or how images available in subscription databases or on the web, can be used. This is why copyright and fair use comes into play. For general information on copyright law, look at Copyright Law for Librarians and Educators: Creative Strategies and Practical Solutions. For copyright information related to the visual arts, your best resources are from the College Art Association. Copyright, Permissions, and Fair Use among Visual Artists and the Academic and Museum Visual Arts Communities was released in 2014 and and the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts was released earlier this year. Study these documents and know them well.

Get experience – if you can

Some institutions don’t have a visual resources collection, but those that do usually need help. Don’t hesitate to reach out to a visual resources professional and ask if you can volunteer, intern, or even just visit the collection and learn more about what they do and what a typical day is like for them.

So this is what I recommend doing as a library science student if you are interested in visual resources. If other visual resources professionals are reading this, I’m curious to hear what you also recommend!

Job Posting: Digital Collections Content Coordinator, Dallas Museum of Art, Texas

The Dallas Museum of Art is currently searching for four Digital Collections Content Coordinators for a full-time, grant-funded, five year period. I’m including a link to the full job description and online application for the position: http://ch.tbe.taleo.net/CH07/ats/careers/requisition.jsp?org=DMA&cws=1&rid=254

We would be grateful if you would share this with colleagues or other potential candidates who you feel would make a great addition to the DMA interpretation team.

Job Description:

Working as a part of the Digital Collections Content Team under the leadership of the Interpretation Manager, the Digital Collections Content Coordinators are responsible for producing digital collections content that reflects the highest standards of quality and scholarship while remaining accessible to a broad public audience both online and in the galleries. The Digital Collections Content Coordinators will also review collections metadata records to improve their quality and consistency in accordance with best practices in the field for collection cataloguing. Using tools created by the DMA’s software and technology teams, the Digital Collections Content Coordinator will create, digitize, and aggregate digital content to support the interpretation and understanding of artworks from the Museum’s permanent collection and long-term loans.

Essential Functions:

● Digitize, aggregate, and author digital content in support of the permanent collections and long-term loans in order to ensure quality and consistency of collection content.

● Review of object metadata in the Museum’s Collection Management System (CMS) by checking facts, validating consistency, and verifying primary image selection.

● Collect data and information from verifiable sources related to DMA artworks.

● Take direction from the Interpretation Manager in order to achieve the critical aspects of an interpretive strategy that fulfills the needs of the DMA’s online collection.

● Work with DMA’s Collection Database Manager and Imaging Department to ensure that collections data and images are consistent, accurate, and complete whenever possible.

● Work closely with DMA Curators under the leadership of the Interpretation Manager to ensure that digital collections content reflects the highest standards of quality and scholarship.

● Participate in ongoing evaluations that integrate visitor research and evaluation into the design and development of digital interpretive content for the permanent collection.

● Collaborate with Editorial staff and follows house style in all written materials.

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:

● Master’s Degree in Art History or related field required

● Academic background or experience in one or more of the following: African art, Asian art, European art, American art, pre-Columbian art, contemporary art, or decorative arts and design

● Experience working in a museum setting in a curatorial, education, or digital media role desired

● Excellent writing and strong research skills

● Strong digital content skills and experience using web tools preferred

● Prior experience in meeting strict deadlines under limited supervision

● Excellent interpersonal and communication skills

● Proven ability to work productively within a team

From Records to Data: Seeing and Sharing Digital Cultural Heritage Collections Differently with Recollection

From Records to Data: Seeing and Sharing Digital Cultural Heritage Collections Differently with Recollection
Brooklyn Public Library

Trevor Owens, Digital Archivist with the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) at the Library of Congress, will give a lecture titled “From Records to Data: Seeing and Sharing Digital Cultural Heritage Collections Differently with Recollection” at Brooklyn Public Library’s Dr. S. Stevan Dweck Center for Contemporary Culture on Thursday, May 19th from 3-4:30pm.

Owens will introduce and demonstrate the utility of Recollection, a free open source platform for generating and customizing views (interactive maps, timelines, facets, tag clouds) that allow scholars, librarians and curators to explore digital collections in novel and intuitive ways. This demonstration will show how content stewards can ingest collections from spreadsheets, sets of MODS records, or RSS and Atom feeds and then generate a range of interactive visualizations, including charts and maps, as well as sophisticated faceted browser interfaces for users of their digital collections.

We especially invite students and professionals interested in cultural heritage, digital curation and preservation, information visualization and other similar fields to attend.

Brooklyn Public Library
Central Library
10 Grand Army Plaza
718-230-2762
www.brooklynpubliclibrary.org