Tag Archives: artists

Discovering art through fiction

I think it’s safe to say that here at ArLiSNAP, we all love art and we all love books. This month I ran into a couple of art/book intersections I found really fascinating. The first is a great post by Scott Indrisek on artsy where 18 artists share books that have inspired them.

This is a fun, kind of back-door way to find artists you might connect with. I found myself clicking through to see the work of artists who like the same books as me. Artist Shara Hughes shares my love for Eckhart Tolle’s mind-bending spiritual book A New Earth, and her collage-like, colorful paintings really appeal to me.

Kevin Wilson’s novel The Family Fang is a book I often put on my staff picks shelf when I worked at a public library. It chronicles the misadventures of a dysfunctional family in which the parents use their children as props in public art performances. Turns out this is one of provocative painter Betty Tompkin’s “favorite novels about art.”

Check out the list: do you see any of your own favorite titles mentioned here?

The second art/book intersection I noticed this month is Sara Baume’s novel A Line Made by Walking. Baume takes the title from Richard Long’s 1967 photograph of the same name, showing, as you might expect, a line he made by walking:

A Line Made by Walking 1967 Richard Long born 1945 Purchased 1976 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/P07149

 

But Baume’s use of specific art works is hardly limited to the novel’s title. The book centers on Frankie, a young artist floundering in a disorienting depression. Almost as if she’s planting markers in the ground, Frankie periodically “tests herself”, describing art works related to a particular subject. As she pulls her beloved, late grandmother’s bicycle out of a shed:

Works about Sheds, I test myself: Cornelia Parker, Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View. In 1991 the Banbury Army School of Ammunition agreed to blow up a perfectly ordinary garden shed at the artist’s request…

These are real works of art with real historical context, that somehow Baume deftly fits into the life and thoughts of her fictional character. I didn’t immediately recognize the artist Cornelia Parker by name, but the description of Cold Dark Matter reminded me of a work I’d seen at the ICA Boston. A quick Google search surfaced the piece: Hanging Fire (Suspected Arson), which I then read about at length.

Cornelia Parker, Hanging Fire (Suspected Arson), 1999. Charcoal, wire, pins, and nails, 144 × 60 × 72 inches (365.8 × 152.4 × 182.9 cm). Gift of Barbara Lee, The Barbara Lee Collection of Art by Women. Photo by Charles Mayer Photography. © Cornelia Parker

Baume includes an index of artworks, listed by chapter, at the end of the novel. Many I’ve studied (Vito Acconci’s Following Piece, Tracy Emin’s My Bed), some I’ve seen (Christian Marclay’s The Clock), but most were new to me. This was such a unique way to encounter art; because I was deeply involved with the character and her struggles, I cared about the specific works of art that had affected her and were now helping her find her way. I often stopped to look things up, such as Wolfgang Laib’s Milkstones, which I find indescribably moving. These sculptures many have left me cold, had I discovered them without Baume leading me there.

 

I leave you with this short video showing Laib’s meditative creative process, and a very strong recommendation to read A Line Made by Walking this summer!

 

Call for Submissions: Archiving the Arts symposium

The Association of Moving Image Archivists Student Chapter at New York University and Independent Media Arts Preservation invite submissions for…

Archiving the Arts: addressing preservation in the creative process.

This symposium will explore the relationship between media artists and audiovisual archivists. Archiving the Arts allows for a dialogue that can enhance mutual understanding between both constituencies. By exposing these communities to best practices, working methods, and the technological and industrial realities faced by members of each group, we hope to foster a discussion, improve the current conditions, and widen awareness of preventative preservation for the long term.

The combined problems of born-digital works and media obsolescence intensify the urgency of preemptive preservation practices. Film and video archivists know all too well the risks media artworks face. At the same time, artists face the same concerns—not just with completed works, with the raw materials of film, video, audio, digital objects—that are essential to their ongoing creative process. But often these two groups lack a common language and a way for their communities to interact and develop tools that serve all parties. Archivists don’t necessarily understand the creative process. Artists don’t always think about their work in terms of its preservation.

Archiving the Arts promotes dialogue between working professionals, artists, students, and other interested parties whose goal is to prevent avoidable loss of creative works by integrating preservation strategies into moving image creation and production.

The day-long symposium of panels, screenings, and workshops will tackle the practical, theoretical, and technical issues that affect the artist and the archivist. Working across disciplines will result in a dynamic conversation and create a deeper understanding of the importance of preventative preservation.

Please see the Call for Papers below and join us on October 13th, 2012 during Archives Week in New York City.

 www.imappreserve.org                         www.AMIAstudentsNYC.com

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CALL FOR PAPERS — ARCHIVING THE ARTS 

The AMIA (Association of Moving Image Archivists) Student Chapter at New York University invites presentation proposals forArchiving the Arts, to be held jointly with IMAP (Independent Media Arts Preservation) in New York City on Saturday, October 13th, 2012 as part of Archives Week organized by Archivists Roundtable of New York – www.nycarchivists.org.

Please submit a 250-word proposal to Kathryn Gronsbell at NYU.AMIA@gmail.com

Priority will be given to submissions received by Friday, May 4, 2012.

Papers, presentations, workshops, and posters are welcome on all issues concerning artists and audiovisual archivist. Possible topics include:

Preventative Preservation

How do we integrate preservation strategies into creation? What are the benefits? What are the disadvantages?

Technically Speaking – creating & ingesting born-digital objects

What are the technical issues/specs regarding metadata crawling, signal problems, and the application of preventative preservation in production?

Temporal Art

How does ephemeral art act as a counterargument to preservation? How do conservators work with artists who wish to intentionally destroy or abandon their own work?  How do artists who restrict their work to a single format exist for posterity?

From the Studio to the Archive

How do artists’ intentions affect collection development? Archive policies and practices?

Growing an “Organic” Archive

“Organic” archives are repositories that develop from the intentions and desires of the contributing artist(s). How are artists and archivists working (or not working) together to create this type of archival system? What is known about existing “Organic” archives and what methods can be used to expand their potential?

Put Your Best Fail Forward

Share your unique collection/archival challenges that were not resolved, and why. Artists – what attempts have you made to ensure the welfare of your work? What is the disconnect between theory and practice?

Job Posting: Cataloger/Librarian at the Brooklyn Museum

BROOKLYN MUSEUM LIBRARY POSITION                                             

POSITION :    Cataloger/Librarian 

DEPARTMENT : Libraries/Archives 

REQUIREMENTS : M.L.S./MSLIS,  extensive experience with library automated systems especially Millennium and OCLC Connexion. Experience with cataloging research materials related to art history.

RESPONSIBILITIES: Conduct search of items in the Institutional Files and in the Archives to ascertain rarity and to catalog these publications on the item level (original or copy cataloging). Focus will be on publications on Brooklyn art or artists. Authority work and data cleanup will be involved.

Salary: Commensurate with experience.

Schedule: 7-14 hours a week within a Monday through Friday 9 – 5 schedule

August – October 2011

Deadline for applications: July 29th, 2011

Please send cover letter and resume to: 

job.pt.cataloger@brooklynmuseum.org

Applicants for positions at the Brooklyn Museum are considered without regard to race, creed, color, country of origin, sex, age, citizenship, disability, marital status or sexual orientation.  Candidates of color are strongly encouraged to apply.  The Immigration and Control Act (1986) requires that all hires be in conformity with the law.