A Success Story: An Interview with Lindsey Reynolds

Lindsey Reynolds is the new(ish) Art Librarian at the Birmingham Museum of Art, in Birmingham, Alabama (http://www.artsbma.org). She’s graciously agreed to answer some questions for us here at ArLiSNAP.

Lindsey-Reynolds_sq_web-375x375

Can you tell us a little bit about your background and your current position?

I got my MLIS degree from the University of Alabama in December 2011. I was fortunate to receive the ARLIS/NA internship award that year, so I went to New York in the Spring of 2012 to intern with the New York Art Resources Consortium (MoMA, the Frick, and the Brooklyn Museum libraries). After that, I took an archiving job at an architecture firm in Atlanta. In mid-2013 I went back to New York to work at the Whitney as the Library Assistant. And last September I started as the Librarian at the Birmingham Museum of Art.

What drew you to this position and art librarianship in general?

I had frequented the BMA as a student and really respected their permanent collection. I enjoy being at a smaller institution – I’ve gotten to know all of my colleagues and get to work on more museum-wide projects. The museum has recently challenged itself to grow from a regional clearing house for travelling exhibitions to a nationally-recognized and locally relevant museum, producing our own exhibitions and providing a socially-engaged, creative platform for our community. I’m excited to be a part of that change.

What are your main roles/duties at your current position?

I have a few interns and volunteers, but I’m the only librarian at the museum which means I am responsible for both the library collection and the institutional archives. So far I’ve been getting familiar with the collection and doing some housekeeping. I’m planning a stacks shift for the summer, and am working on a records retention policy for the museum which will hopefully help to grow our institutional archive. I’m most excited to start acquiring artist’s books.

What is a typical day like for you?

My days vary tremendously, that’s one of my favorite parts of the job. Since I’m the only one, I can really tailor my day to suit my moods – some days I do a little bit of everything (policy writing, outreach, reference, acquisitions), other days I dedicate to one task (cataloging or processing usually), and other days I have so many meetings that I hardly get to sit down at my desk!

What were/are some challenges for you as a new art librarian? Are these related to larger challenges in art librarianship?

At first my biggest challenge felt like finding a job. Now that I’ve tried a few, I think one of the biggest challenges for me, and for museum libraries in general, is staying relevant and visible to my colleagues and to the public. It can be hard to push for more funding since libraries don’t typically generate income – I see it as an opportunity for creativity and collaboration.

What are the most important things emerging art librarians should know?

There are so many opportunities out there! Look around and find a career path that suits you (see the “New Voices in the Profession” panel at the ARLIS/NA conference if you need ideas!)

When you’re applying for jobs pay attention to where the library falls in an institution’s hierarchy – it can tell you a lot about the institution’s priorities and their commitment to the library/archives department.

Just for fun – what is your favorite library? Work of art or artist?

Oh geez – those are unanswerable questions. I’m pretty enamored with Etel Adnan’s work lately. I had never seen her artist’s books until the Whitney Biennial last year, and I think they’re great. I also really enjoy the things that the Office of Culture and Design are doing in the Philippines, especially the Manila Review. They are using publications as a platform for community engagement and are a great example of what social practitioners can achieve and keeping a sense of humor throughout it all.

Job Posting: Reference Librarian – SCAD, Savannah, GA

The Savannah School of Art and Design is seeking applicants for the position of Reference Librarian.

This position works with Reference Department staff and other library staff members to assist students, faculty and staff in their research and instruction needs. The Reference Librarian also assists in the promotion of library collections and services to the SCAD Community.
· ALA-accredited MLS or MLIS degree
· Ability to plan and provide library instruction that incorporates information literacy standards and current teaching practices
· Current knowledge in the library field to address general and subject-specific information resources and effective search strategies
· Up-to-date and knowledgeable about emerging technologies that support reference and instructional services
· Education or significant research experience in one or more subjects offered at SCAD
· Superior verbal, written and interpersonal communication skills
· Prior experience working collaboratively with faculty, students and staff in an academic library environment is preferred

Details and application instructions can be viewed at https://scadjobs.scad.edu/postings/9601.

Join Us for Visualizing the Future: New Perspectives in Art Librarianship!

WebinarLogo

Our virtual conference is now open for registration! Check out our full line-up of spectacular speakers here.

This virtual conference will take place on Jan 17, 2015 at 12:00 PM CST.

Register now!

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4374379886671502081

ArLiSNAP and VREPS are proud to present our virtual conference, Visualizing the Future: New Perspectives in Art Librarianship. This event will serve as a venue for students and new professionals to present, share advice, and discuss the future of our evolving profession. For a full schedule and list of presentations, please visit arlisnap.org.

This event is free and open to all; attendees do not need to be members of ARLIS/NA or VRA. Registration will close two hours before the start of the webinar. For assistance, please contact webinars@arlisna.org. Additional information about webinars is available on the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal.

This webinar will be recorded, and the video will be made available on the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal within two weeks after the webinar.

By registering, I understand and acknowledge that this Webinar will be recorded by ARLIS/NA and/or those designated by ARLIS/NA. ARLIS/NA may record my name and questions I ask during the course of the Webinar presentation. As a condition of my participation in the Webinar, I agree to irrevocably grant to ARLIS/NA, its assigns, licensees and successors the right to publish, record, broadcast, exhibit, display, reproduce, edit or otherwise use perpetually throughout the world, in all media now and hereafter known or devised, in whole or in part, my name, questions, quotes and material otherwise provided by me (collectively, the “Material”) during my participation in the Webinar. I also agree that ARLIS/NA shall be the sole owner in perpetuity of any and all rights in and to any and all works containing the Material, in whole or in part, for all purposes whatsoever and in any manner or media including, without limitation, printed works, compact discs, DVDs, MP3, and computer on line services.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

View System Requirements

2015/16 Kress Fellowship in Art Librarianship at Yale University

Fixed Duration Position:  12 months from date of hire; non-renewable
Expected Start Date:        July 6, 2015

Yale University offers exciting opportunities for achievement and growth in New Haven, Connecticut.  Conveniently located between Boston and New York, New Haven is the creative capital of Connecticut with cultural resources that include two major art museums, a critically-acclaimed repertory theater, state-of-the-art concert hall, and world-renowned schools of Architecture, Art, Drama, and Music.

POSITION DESCRIPTION

The Yale University Library welcomes applications for the 2015/16 Kress Fellowship in Art Librarianship. The Kress Fellowship is intended for a recent graduate from library school who wishes to pursue a career in art librarianship. This fellowship is made possible through the generosity of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.   Through this fellowship, the Kress Foundation seeks to achieve in the field of art librarianship what it has accomplished for art history and art conservation:  ensuring the growth of the discipline by promoting the advancement of new professionals.

The Haas Family Arts Library at Yale serves a distinguished array of academic and museum programs, architects, artists and scholars. Kress Fellows have the opportunity to interact with faculty, staff and students in distinguished Schools of Architecture, Art, and Drama; a nationally ranked department of the History of Art; and two outstanding university art museums, the Yale Center for British Art and the Yale University Art Gallery. They also have occasion to collaborate with colleagues from throughout the Yale University Library, including the Sterling Memorial Library, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and the library and rare books department of the Yale Center for British Art. The rich professional and scholarly resources of New York City and Boston’s art libraries and museums are within two hours travel, providing still further opportunities for professional growth and professional contact with colleagues.

RESPONSIBILITIES

The Kress Fellowship is a 12-month appointment and focuses on multiple areas of art librarianship including public services, collection development and management, special collections, and digital collections.  Projects and activities will draw on subject areas served by the Haas Arts Library including the history of art, architecture, drama, and aligned area studies. The fellow will gain experience in reference services and library research education in the Haas Family Arts Library, the Haas Arts Special Collections, and the Library and Archives of the Yale Center for British Art. Other activities will vary based on current Yale Library projects and the fellow’s interest and experience.

During their tenure at Yale, Kress Fellows are expected to pursue mutually agreed-upon projects resulting in a publishable paper, a new library service (such as a webpage or research guide), or other relevant deliverables. Kress Fellows are also introduced to a broad spectrum of professional activities and may have the opportunity to perform collection development activities or assist with library-based exhibitions.   Kress Fellows also participate in library planning committees and task forces and engage in campus, regional, and national professional organizations and other collaborative activities. Fellows are also expected to be professionally active and represent the Library and the University in the academic, scholarly, and professional community.

QUALIFICATIONS

Master’s degree from an ALA-accredited program for library and information science.  Excellent analytical, organizational, management, customer service, and interpersonal skills.  Ability to effectively build partnerships and promote the benefits of change in an academic culture that often values ambiguity, diversity of opinion, and historic precedent.  Ability to communicate effectively through both oral and written expression.  Ability to work both independently and collegially in a demanding and rapidly changing environment.

Preferred:  Advanced degree and/or relevant experience in history of art, architecture or related arts disciplines.  Experience with web design and development and electronic information resources.  Experience with HTML and XML.  Reading knowledge of two or more Western European languages.

Click here for more information.

Profile: Sheila Cork, Art Librarian at the New Orleans Museum of Art

Name: Sheila Cork
Job: Art Librarian at the New Orleans Museum of Art

NOMA

Walking into the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA), one would hardly know that beneath the beautiful marble and tiled floor there is a Special Library, the Felix J. Dreyfous library to be exact. A set of inconspicuous doors lead the visitor down to the administrative offices and the library sits, waiting, on the other side of glass walls.

One woman, Sheila Cork, runs the show as the Art Librarian in a library that is home to over 20,000 titles (mostly monographs), 70 art-specific journal titles, and exhibition archives from 1911 – 2000.

“The biggest thing I found in my life… is to volunteer in something in your field. It will always lead to something,” she says when prompted for advice for young professionals.

Volunteering is how Cork found her way to libraries in the first place. Starting in 1985, Cork began to volunteer at her local library in England. She started with book mending and worked her way up to Circulation Services. When she and her husband moved to the United States, Cork realized that to continue advancing in the field, she would have to earn her MLIS degree.

While working in the Reference department at the Hancock County Library in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, Cork studied to earn her masters degree from the University of Southern Mississippi. During the course of her studies, Cork was made the Head of Information Services at the library. Although she liked the promotion, she realized that it was “very administrative and not very ‘hand-on’.”

Seeking a change, Cork applied for the position as an Art Librarian at a “Fine Art Institution” according to the job ad. That “Fine Art Institution” happened to be the New Orleans Museum of Art. Cork and her husband moved to New Orleans in June 2005, two months before Hurricane Katrina ripped through the city.

“We were lucky…we only had puddles to clean up,” Cork said, thinking back to her first days on the job.

Since becoming the Librarian at NOMA, Cork has put into place a volunteer system, with 8 to 9 people (usually undergraduate students) who work 2 to 4 hours a week. She has coordinated the NOMA Book Club, discussion groups, author events, field trips, and programming. Her current projects include digitizing scrapbooks/ephemera and digitizing Works Progress Act project files.

When asked for any closing words of wisdom, Cork replied, “Be flexible about what you do. Be able to work with different people. And never be afraid to clean the windows.”

Submit your proposal for the ArLiSNAP/VREPS Virtual Conference!

WebinarLogo

 

ArLiSNAP and VREPS (Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students) are joining forces to host a virtual conference this winter! The conference is titled Visualizing the Future: New Perspectives in Art Librarianship, and will take place on the afternoon of Saturday, January 17th, 2015.  This is an excellent opportunity for those who cannot be physically present at our annual conferences.

 

We are looking for students and new professionals with an interest in art librarianship or visual resources management to present their work. Have you been working on a project using technology in a new way? Do you have thoughts to share on topics such as metadata and visual resources, copyright and the arts, or visual literacy? Would you like to share your work with the ARLIS and VRA communities? Submit your proposal, and add your voice to our discussion on the future of the field!

 

Other sessions in this event will include:

  • A roundtable of new professionals, who will share advice about starting out in your career. The speakers will answer questions about their work, as well as their thoughts on the best ways to gain experience and job hunt in this field.
  • A panel on initiatives in art archiving, where speakers working on documentation and preservation will discuss their work, and suggest ways for students to get involved.
  • A keynote speech from art librarian Elizabeth Lane, who will discuss her current work and her thoughts on the future of the profession.

 

Requirements:

  1. Presenters must be MLIS students or new professionals with fewer than five years of experience in the field.
  2. Presentations will be between ten and fifteen minutes in length.
  3. Ideally, presenters will be available for a live presentation and brief Q&A session on the afternoon of Saturday, January 17th, 2015. However, pre-recording the presentation prior to the event may also be possible.

 

Submit your proposal via this link by Saturday, November 15th.

 

If you have any questions about this event, please don’t hesitate to contact Ellen Tisdale, ArLiSNAP Co-Moderator, at ellen.j.tisdale [at] gmail [dot] com.

Job Posting: Architecture Library Specialist, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ

The Architecture Library Specialist is responsible for the Architecture Library in the absence
of the Director. The position works a closing shift schedule (currently 12:30 pm to 8:30 pm
during fall and spring semesters). The schedule may include any hours of days of the week
that the Architecture Library is open and may be changed as needed. For more information
see http://library.njit.edu/jobs.

Link out to posting (.pdf)