The Dual-Degree Art Librarian: Survey and Guide for Career Planning (by Autumn Wetli & Sarah Bilotta)

Whether or not a second Master’s, or perhaps even a PhD, is needed for the subject specialist librarian is an area of debate. We have decided to think about this conversation specifically in the terms of Art Librarianship. Gathered are some pros and cons to getting the advanced degree in art/art history, formulated from the thoughts of fellow ArLiSNAP followers and some scholarly articles on the subject.

For the purposes of informally ascertaining a consensus among early career art librarians or those interested in the field, we conducted some preliminary research with scholarly materials that address the educational requirements for professional art librarian jobs, as well as the opinions of more established art librarians. We then used this research as inspiration to formulate methods for engaging the perspectives of new and emerging art librarians. This culminated in circulating an open-ended question to evoke the thoughts and opinions of our colleagues, both via e-mail with librarians we have worked with and through the e-mail listserv of ArLiSNAP. In order to achieve varied and unrestricted opinions, we solicited feedback on the basis that we were curious to hear about colleagues’ experiences in the field in relation to this topic in a broad sense. All respondents were informed that this information would be used for an ArLiSNAP blog post (with the option to remain anonymous). For this survey and the resultant blog article, “subject Master’s degree” and “second Master’s degree” are intended to refer to a Master’s degree in a subject other than librarianship, obtained before, after, or in conjunction with a librarianship Master’s degree, and meant to bolster the scholarly research capabilities of a librarian in the field of the arts and design.

From the results of this survey, we have drawn conclusions not necessarily about the overarching value (or lack thereof) of the subject Master’s degree to the field of art librarianship, but about individual librarians’ experiences with or without a subject Master’s degree and patterns among this small sample of librarians, which may be indicative of trends warranting either further study or consideration for librarians who are considering a second Master’s degree.

From the nine responses we received from our call out for opinions, four individuals have a Master’s degree in a subject other than librarianship and five do not. Of the five respondents who do not have a second Master’s degree, two have completed partial coursework towards a second Master’s degree and one is currently applying to dual degree programs.

Responses from our survey

PROS

Research Experience
“[Getting a second Master’s degree] is a rewarding experience…something that has come in very handy as an academic librarian.”
-Librarian with a second Master’s

“I think I would consider pursuing a second Master’s degree to not only further my understanding of the field, but also have a better grasp on the type of research [that] is done at the graduate level by participating in it myself.”
-Librarian with a Master’s degree in librarianship, but without a subject Master’s

“…the [Master’s degree in Art History] provided me with appropriate knowledge of arts and art history subject areas; resources, tools, and methodologies; and vocabulary to meet the requirements of the co-op role, and that experience has been invaluable for shaping my readiness to enter the workforce in art librarianship.”
-Librarian with a Master’s degree in Art History, currently working on MLIS

“[Getting a subject Master’s degree] is a rewarding experience and really helped me learn how to sculpt a scholarly research project, something that has come in very handy as an academic librarian.”
-Librarian with an arts-related subject Master’s degree, currently working on MLIS

Job Possibilities
“I have held two professional librarian positions since graduating from library school, and both asked for an Art History MA as a preferred requirement.”
-Librarian with MLIS and MA in Art History

“…feedback [from others in the art librarianship field] has consistently been a positive assertion that having the two degrees will help me have a competitive edge in the job search.”
-Librarian with a Master’s degree in Art History, currently working on MLIS

“My current job does not require the second masters, but other positions I might be interested in down the line do require it for promotion…”
-Librarian with MLIS and partial coursework towards MA in Art History

Enhanced Opportunities for Professional Development
“Though I have yet to determine if — or how — having a second, subject specific Master’s will help my career in art librarianship, I can say that it has had a strong influence in my professional development throughout the MLIS program.”
-Librarian with a Master’s degree in Art History, currently working on MLIS

“[Having a subject Master’s degree] has gone a long way to gaining acceptance and interest from members of professional organizations that cover the intersection of arts and librarianship.”
-Librarian with an arts-related subject Master’s degree, currently working on MLIS

Strengthened Relationships with Art Scholars

“…it’s always helpful for an academic librarian to have a second master’s degree or even PhD. It can go a long way in your ability to gain respect or trust from faculty and administration.”
-Librarian with MLIS, previously enrolled in MA program in Art History

“I definitely find it easier to be an art & design librarian without an extra Master’s than I think I might serving art history [faculty].”
-Librarian with MLIS but no subject Master’s degree

“Having an advanced degree helps when you are working with senior scholars, whether curators or university academics.”
-Librarian with MA in Art History and Master’s degree in Librarianship

CONS

Cost
“[Enrollment in Master’s degree program in Art History] was costing a fortune, and I knew my loan debt was already staggering.”
-Librarian with MLIS and partial coursework towards MA in Art History

“To me the biggest reason not to get a second master’s was the money. I wasn’t sure that the investment would be necessary or pay off sufficiently to warrant the debt.”
-Librarian with MLIS but no subject Master’s degree

“If I could go back and do it again, the only thing I would change is lowering the amount of student loans I took out…Luckily I qualify for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program because I work for a university, but who knows what will happen with that program in the near future…”
-Librarian with MLIS and MA in Art History

A Degree is Only What You Make of It
“I do think it’s a challenge to find a good position in the field regardless of whether you pursue the second degree.”
-Librarian with MLIS but no subject Master’s degree

“I think the more you do and achieve, the higher your chances will be for potentially landing that ideal position you’ve got your sights set on…”
-Librarian currently applying to Master’s degree programs

“…having served on a few search committees now, I can say that it’s not necessarily the education that gets you the job, but rather the way you present yourself and articulate the ways in which you can/have applied that education to a practical position as a librarian.”
-Librarian with MLIS and MA in Art History

Not All Art Librarian Positions Require a Subject Master’s

“[A second Master’s degree] is not required for my current role where I lead the library’s instruction program and work with a variety of subject areas.”
-Librarian with MLIS, previously enrolled in MA program in Art History

“[In my current position] the second Master’s is less needed because I’m not being asked to help with graduate level research. So in general, I think it depends on your position and the level of research you are expected to help with.”
-Librarian with MLIS but no subject Master’s degree

Responses in the Literature
In addition to reaching out to our colleagues, we looked at a couple articles that performed studies on the MLIS and an advanced subject degree. This was not an exhaustive search into the literature on this topic, but rather, a very brief look into the results of a couple similar surveys. Much like the results of our own informal survey, the importance of a second advanced subject degree, really depends on the individual and should be evaluated on case-by-case scenarios.

Echoing responses we heard from ArLiSNAP followers, one of pros of an advanced-subject degree was found in its ability to make the librarian a better researcher than if they had just pursued the MLIS. This helps the librarian in two ways. First, it better prepares them for research and publication of their own, which can help with career advancement in regards to tenure and/or promotion (Mayer & Terrill, 2005, p. 68). Secondly, the librarian has first-hand research experience that many patrons, perhaps particularly graduate students and faculty, need (ibid.) One article made an interesting note, that from their research, the demand for second masters or advanced degrees was found to be most desirable for library administrators (Ferguson, 2016, p. 732).

Many School of Information programs offer dual degrees, which allow students to receive the a second, subject specialized Master, at less cost and time than pursuing the MA/MS solely on its own. Art History as a second Masters is commonly a part of these programs. A few programs that offer such are The University of North Carolina, Indiana University Bloomington, Pratt Institute, and Kent State University.

References

Ferguson, J. (2016). Additional degree required: advanced subject knowledge and academic librarianship. Libraries and the Academy, 16(4), 721-736. Retrieved from https://muse.jhu.edu/article/632342

Mayer, J. & Terrill, L. J. (2005). Academic librarians’ attitudes about advanced-subject degrees. College & Research Libraries, 66(1), 59-70. https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.66.1.59

Kress Fellowship in Art Librarianship – Yale University, New Haven, CT

Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library
Yale University, New Haven, CT

Fixed Duration Position:  10 months from date of hire; non-renewable

Expected Start Date:        July 1, 2018

 

Yale University offers exciting opportunities for achievement and growth in New Haven, Connecticut.  Conveniently located between Boston and New York, New Haven is the creative capital of Connecticut with cultural resources that include two major art museums, a critically-acclaimed repertory theater, state-of-the-art concert hall, and world-renowned schools of Architecture, Art, Drama, and Music.

 

THE UNIVERSITY AND THE LIBRARY

The Yale University Library, as one of the world’s leading research libraries, collects, organizes, preserves, and provides access to and services for a rich and unique record of human thought and creativity. It fosters intellectual growth and supports the teaching and research missions of Yale University and scholarly communities worldwide. A distinctive strength is its rich spectrum of resources, including around 15 million volumes and information in all media, ranging from ancient papyri to early printed books to electronic databases. The Library is engaging in numerous projects to expand access to its physical and digital collections. Housed in eighteen buildings including the Sterling Memorial Library, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and the Bass Library, it employs a dynamic and diverse staff of approximately five hundred who offer innovative and flexible services to library readers. For additional information on the Yale University Library, please visit the Library’s web site at web.library.yale.edu.

 

THE ROBERT B. HAAS FAMILY ARTS LIBRARY
The Haas Family Arts Library at Yale consists of collections from three formerly-separate operating units: Art and Architecture, Arts of the Book, and Drama. Now located under one roof, these libraries support the Schools of Architecture, Art, and Drama, and the department of the History of Art, as well as the teaching and research needs of the Yale community beyond the visual arts. In addition, the Arts Library houses several prominent archival and special collections in Art and Architecture, Arts of the Book, and Drama, ranging from type specimens and woodblocks to theatrical archives to one of the world’s foremost collection of books on color. For additional information on the Haas Family Arts Library, please visit the Library’s web site at web.library.yale.edu/arts.

 

POSITION DESCRIPTION

The Yale University Library welcomes applications for the 2018/19 Kress Fellowship in Art Librarianship. The Kress Fellowship is intended for a recent graduate from library school who wishes to pursue a career in art librarianship. This fellowship is made possible through the generosity of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.   Through this fellowship, the Kress Foundation seeks to achieve in the field of art librarianship what it has accomplished for art history and art conservation:  ensuring the growth of the discipline by promoting the advancement of new professionals.

The Haas Family Arts Library at Yale serves a distinguished array of academic and museum programs, architects, artists and scholars. Kress Fellows have the opportunity to interact with faculty, staff and students in distinguished Schools of Architecture, Art, and Drama; a nationally ranked department of the History of Art; and two outstanding university art museums, the Yale Center for British Art and the Yale University Art Gallery. They also have occasion to collaborate with colleagues from throughout the Yale University Library, including the Sterling Memorial Library, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and the library and rare books department of the Yale Center for British Art. The rich professional and scholarly resources of New York City and Boston’s art libraries and museums are within two hours’ travel, providing further opportunities for professional growth and professional contact with colleagues.

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

The Kress Fellowship is a 10-month appointment and focuses on multiple areas of art librarianship including public services, collection development and management, special collections, and digital collections.  Projects and activities will draw on subject areas served by the Haas Arts Library including the history of art, architecture, drama, and aligned area studies. The fellow will gain experience in reference services and library research education in the Haas Family Arts Library, Haas Arts Library Special Collections, and the Library and Archives of the Yale Center for British Art. Other activities will vary based on current Yale Library projects and the fellow’s interest and experience.

During their tenure at Yale, Kress Fellows are expected to pursue mutually agreed-upon projects resulting in a publishable paper, a new library service (such as a webpage or research guide), or other relevant deliverables. Kress Fellows are also introduced to a broad spectrum of professional activities and may have the opportunity to perform collection development activities or assist with library-based exhibitions. Kress Fellows also participate in library planning committees and task forces and engage in campus, regional, and national professional organizations and other collaborative activities. Fellows are expected to be professionally active and represent the Library and the University in the academic, scholarly, and professional community. 

 

QUALIFICATIONS

Master’s degree from an ALA-accredited program for library and information science. Background in history of art, architecture or related arts disciplines. Excellent analytical, organizational, management, customer service, and interpersonal skills.  Ability to effectively build partnerships and promote the benefits of change in an academic culture that often values ambiguity, diversity of opinion, and historic precedent.  Ability to communicate effectively through both oral and written expression.  Ability to work both independently and collegially in a demanding and rapidly changing environment.

Preferred:  Advanced degree and/or relevant experience in history of art, architecture or related arts disciplines.  Experience with web design and development and electronic information resources. Experience with HTML and XML.  Reading knowledge of two or more Western European languages.

 

SALARY AND BENEFITS

The Kress Fellowship is a competitive position. Applicants should submit a current resume or CV, a brief cover letter/statement of interest, and names and contact information for three professional references to Lindsay King via e-mail at lindsay.king@yale.edu, before February 1, 2018. The statement of interest is expected to reflect a genuine commitment to art librarianship and an interest in the provision of information services to the visual arts community. There is no application form. Please be sure to include “2018/19 Kress Fellowship” in the e-mail subject and cover letter.  A search committee of Yale librarians will review submissions. The Kress Fellow will be in residence at Yale for ten months and will receive an award of $40,000, prorated over the fellowship term. Health insurance will be provided.

 

BACKGROUND CHECK REQUIREMENTS

All external candidates for employment will be subject to pre-employment background screening for this position, which may include motor vehicle and credit checks based on the position description and job requirements. Internal candidates may be subject to a motor vehicle or credit check for this position based on the position description and job requirements. All offers are contingent on successful completion of the required background check. Please visit http://your.yale.edu/policies-procedures/policies/hr-100-employment-policies for additional information on the background check requirements and process.

 

  Yale University is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.  Yale values diversity in its faculty, staff, and students and strongly encourages applications from women and members of underrepresented minority groups.

The Practice and Problems of Digital Art History

I’ve written about the digital humanities (DH) before, posting a brief introduction to some DH tools, classes, and resources. In this post I want to focus specifically on the practice of DH in the field of art history. DH can bring a lot to field, but the practice of digital art history is also not without its challenges. The field of art history entered the digital world when the switch from teaching with slides to teaching with digital images occurred, but academia has pushed further into the digital realm with the increasing ubiquity of researching, publishing, and pursuing scholarship in digital environments (Zorich, 2013).

Not isolated to the field of art history is the reverence for the print publication. Print publishing is currently still the marker by which professors are evaluated for tenure and advancement, Deviating from this model could negatively affect chances for such (Zorich, 2013). Digital projects also present problems in their evaluation. As of yet, there are no general rules or guidelines on how to evaluate the merit of digital scholarship projects in academia. Difficulties also present themselves in the very visual nature of the art history field. Digital image analysis methods are not nearly as straightforward as digital text analysis. (Drucker, 2013 ). Text analysis using digital methods forms a major part of DH scholarship, providing research based on a distant reading of texts (Drucker, 2013 ) Digital methods for image analysis are still “far from being able to imitate human abilities of perception and analysis” (Drucker, 2013, p. 8).

Despite the challenges of digital art history, it is still very much a worthy field to pursue. One way art history faculty can dabble in digital art history, without the pressure and problems associated with doing so in their own research, is by bringing DH methods into the classroom (J. Schell, personal communication, December 4, 2017). The difficulty in evaluating projects still exists, how does a professor grade a digital project versus the standard term paper, but the stakes are lower (J. Schell, personal communication, December 4, 2017). DH in art history offers different ways for students to engage with the material, build skills, and spark their interest in cultural heritage in a different new way (J. Schell, personal communication, December 4, 2017).

Scalar, Omeka, and WordPress are popular tools that are used for creating digital collections and presenting digital exhibits. ImagePlot and ImageJ can be used for analyzing large sets of images. The type of digital tool used really depends on what type of question is being asked. Text analysis can be incorporated into art history studies, too. MALLETT and Voyant are two tools used for text analysis. It could be an interesting project to analyze the papers or letters from an artist’s personal archive. These are just tiny handful of digital tools that can be incorporated into art history scholarship and add meaning to the field.

So, where does the library and the art librarian fit into this? Subject specialists and liasons to art history departments may choose to explore these tools on their own and bring them to their faculty and students as seen fit. If a college has a department or librarian dedicated to DH, the art librarian can create connections between these departments and their own. Librarians have long been champions and purveyors of new technology.. I think even in departments that may be hesitant to move into digital art history territory, the art librarian can bring some simple DH tools into the practice in a way that suitably fits the environment. Creating digital exhibits is a great way to being work with digital scholarship, without using overly complicated tools or needing complex tech skills.

Lastly, I’d like to share some neat digital art history projects I found via the Frick Art Reference Library Digital Art History Lab.

Mapping Art Markets in Europe
Vincent Van Gogh The Letters
UCLA Rome Lab

Drucker, J. (2013). Is there a “digital” art history?. Visual Resources, 29(1-2),           5-13. DOI: 10.1080/01973762.2013.761106

Zorich, D. M. (2013). Digital art history: A community assessment. Visual               Resources, 29(1-2), 14-21. DOI: 10.108010973762.2013.761108

A Success Story: An Interview with Coral Salomón, NDSR Fellow at The University of Pennsylvania Fisher Fine Arts Library

Can you tell us a little bit about your background, your current position, and how you got into the field of art librarianship?
Hello ARLIS/NA!,

I’m from Puerto Rico, but I moved to Boston when I was 18 to obtain my BA in International Relations. After that, I worked for a few years as a project manager in New York City’s translation industry.

I loved NYC’s wealth of cultural heritage institutions and as the years passed, I realized that I wanted to work within that sector. I stumbled upon Pratt Institute’s MLIS curriculum and decided that library school was the right fit for me.

I entered the field of art librarianship thanks to one of the cultural heritage institutions I admired from afar. I was fortunate to obtain a fellowship through Pratt at the Frick Art Reference Library where I was part of NYARC’s web archiving program. It was an incredible experience and I learned a lot from my supervisors, colleagues, and by working within the walls of The Frick Collection. Even though I’ve moved on to a different role, I feel a lot of gratitude towards The Frick. They made me feel like family since day 1 and gave me the confidence to pursue this specialty, even though I don’t have a formal background in the arts.

I’m currently the National Digital Stewardship Resident at the University of Pennsylvania Fisher Fine Arts Library. My yearlong IMLS-funded residency focuses on tackling issues pertaining to the preservation of digital artwork and art information.

You can read more about my project and my cohorts’ projects here.

What does a typical day at work look like for you? What work are you doing as an NDSR art resident?
My project has three components:
• Creating guidelines for a web archiving program focused on the arts.
• Providing repository recommendations for born-digital artworks and art resources produced at Penn.
• Writing a white paper on the acquisition and preservation of publications hosted on apps, YouTube, podcasts, and other untraditional digital platforms.

I’ve been interviewing a lot of people here at Penn to get a better sense of what are the needs of the community. A typical day might include interviewing professors in the fine arts department, curators, museum library directors or artists working on projects affiliated with Penn. I type my notes and then create a small summary of the conversations in a spreadsheet.

I’ve also been meeting with fellow Penn librarians and digital archivists to gather their recommendations and avoid siloing my work. Librarians, archivists, and new media scholars at other institutions have also generously offered me advice and discussed best practices in relation to my project.

So, my typical day involves a lot of listening and typing! Next semester, I’ll begin implementing some of the lessons I’ve learned during the past 4.5 months.

One achievement that I’m proud of is the mapathon for Puerto Rico disaster relief Penn Libraries hosted. I helped organize it, and while it doesn’t fall neatly within art librarianship, it’s an example of how libraries can rise to action in times of need. I was blown away by the student participation and the institution’s support.

Do you have any advice for current students and/or those on the job market?
My advice for current students is to seek out internships or part/full-time jobs in the field while they’re still in school. Internships make life financially difficult, so try to apply to ones that pay or to funds like the ARLIS/NA Wolfgang M. Freitag Internship Award which provide financial support to students seeking out unpaid opportunities.

For those on the job market: apply to your dream jobs, even if you think you’re not qualified. Keep on blogging, going to events, get coffee with people working in the profession, all those things your professors told you to do. Also, networking is not evil. I thought networking was terrible when I was younger, but now I’ve realized it’s just about reaching out to people that are cool and are doing admirable things within this line of work.

I know this is easier said than done, but don’t take job rejections personally. I’ve been surprised that I’ve connected with people (in a positive way!) who’ve turned down my job application. Always thank people and, if you get a human-generated rejection, ask what factors influenced the hiring decision. Sometimes people reply and you get really good advice–I got better at writing cover letters thanks to a kind rejection.

Remember, you are an awesome person and the market does not determine your worth! If anyone wants more specific advice, feel free to tweet me at @csalinphilly!

What were/are some challenges for you as an art librarian? Are these related to larger challenges in art librarianship?
The attack against net neutrality is a huge challenge. Art libraries are boundary-pushers in the effort to preserve and provide access to our digital cultural heritage, as demonstrated by our web archiving programs. This measure, which endangers the openness of the internet and threatens to increase the digital divide, imperils our work and the ability of the public to access our collections and materials. As librarians and archivists, an open and democratic web is vital to ensure we can provide information to all.

Tell us something fun about yourself! What do you do in your spare time? If you could take a trip to visit any library in the world, which would it be?
I really like to bike and luckily Philly is a great biking city.

I also enjoy exploring museums. This year I saw some really great exhibits, including the Whitney’s survey of Hélio Oiticica’s work and the Guggenheim’s Agnes Martin retrospective. I also enjoyed Philadelphia’s public art project, Monument Lab. The pieces were really thoughtful and offered a fun way of getting to know the city.

Someday, I would like to visit the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí, Cuba’s national library. Cuba and Puerto Rico were the last outposts of the Spanish empire in the Caribbean, and I wonder what tales of our combined history are safeguarded there.

Job Posting / Teaching & Research Librarian Fine Arts / Concordia University / Montreal, Quebec

Teaching & Research Librarian Fine Arts – Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec

Concordia University Library seeks a dynamic and innovative librarian for a tenure-track position as Teaching & Research Librarian – Fine Arts.

Concordia University is one of Canada’s most dynamic universities in one of North America’s most livable cities. It reflects a unique blend of commitments to diversity, accessibility, social responsibility, and innovation. With over 45,000 students (7,439 international) and over 2,000 full-time and part-time professors, Concordia is recognized for offering a rich academic experience combined with strong community engagement.

Concordia University Library provides collections and services fundamental to academic success, creation, the advancement of knowledge, and lifelong learning. With a team of 120 librarians, professionals and support staff who put student and faculty success at the centre of their practice, the Library collaborates to achieve the goals outlined in our strategic plan and in the University’s strategic framework and directions. For more information about the services and operations of the Library, see http://library.concordia.ca/.

The Teaching & Research Librarian – Fine Arts is a member of the Library’s professional team, reporting to the Associate University Librarian, Research & Graduate Studies. The incumbent provides support for teaching, learning and research activities in the visual and fine arts to enable and facilitate exploration, knowledge creation and learning. The incumbent develops and implements initiatives to support the use of digital tools for research and teaching and contributes substantively to a variety of Library and University strategic initiatives and projects, through committees, working groups, and project teams. Responsibilities also include research, publication and service to meet requirements for tenure and promotion.

Librarians are members of the Concordia University Faculty Association (CUFA).

RESPONSIBILITIES

Continually develops knowledge of information and media resources within the visual and fine arts and acts as a resource person for librarians, staff, faculty and students.

Provides research help and consultations regarding the discovery and use of information and media resources within the visual and fine arts.

Continually develops knowledge of teaching and learning practices in higher education generally, and in the disciplinary context of the visual and fine arts.

Prepares and delivers curricular and co-curricular instruction for classroom, library and online learning environments.

Develops a thorough familiarity with all aspects of the research and research-creation lifecycle within the visual and fine arts including research methods, research-creation, digital tools, scholarly communication and research data management.

Advises and collaborates with faculty, students and colleagues to facilitate research and, research-creation activities, digital scholarship, data management and scholarly outputs in the visual and fine arts.

Develops and manages digital and print collections in assigned visual and fine arts subject areas.

Participates in collection evaluation, development and management, in consultation with faculty, librarians, and the Associate University Librarian, Collection Services.

Coordinates and contributes to the Library’s exhibits.

Participates on committees, working groups and project teams to contribute to the development of Library and University strategic initiatives and projects.

Contributes to local, regional and national initiatives and projects

QUALIFICATIONS

Professional expertise

A graduate degree from a library school accredited by the American Library Association, or approved equivalent education and training acceptable for membership in the Corporation of Professional Librarians of Québec.

An undergraduate degree and/or graduate degree in the visual or fine arts or in a related discipline is an asset.

Extensive and authoritative knowledge of information resources and sources in a variety of media available to subject areas within the visual and fine arts.

Knowledge of the research and research-creation lifecycles within the visual and fine arts.

Demonstrated ability to develop and deliver effective instructional activities.

Knowledge of scholarly communication models and practices including open access, institutional repositories, and research data management.

Knowledge of research communication and collaboration tools as well as digital scholarship tools (such as data visualization, timeline, mapping, online exhibits, text mining) and the ability to advise on their value and use.

Knowledge of collections development and management issues, concepts and methods in academic libraries.

General Competencies

Demonstrated ability to develop successful partnerships and relationships with faculty and researchers.

Demonstrated project management skills and ability to handle multiple priorities and tasks as well as projects.

Strong motivation, aptitude and interest to establish student and faculty success as the centre of their professional practice.

Ability to work both independently and collaboratively, share expertise, work in teams and negotiate solutions with diverse groups.

Excellent communication skills. Strong analytical and creative problem-solving skills.

Curiosity, drive and flexibility so as to discover and try new things, in support of Library and University strategic directions.

Oral and written fluency in English is essential. Oral fluency in French and basic written French are assets.

Salary and Benefits

Compensation and rank are commensurate with qualifications and experience. The position includes a competitive and comprehensive benefit package.

Concordia University is committed to employment equity.

Application Procedure

Interested candidates must supply the following in one (1) single PDF attachment

·         a letter of interest;

·         curriculum vitae, which must include a statement of your citizenship;

·         the names, email addresses and telephone numbers of three professional references.

 All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority. Only selected candidates will be contacted. Interviews are planned for the week of February 5, 2018. The anticipated position start date will be June 1, 2018.

Candidates should apply in confidence by email to Ms. Sandra Biron, Library Personnel Assistant, at lib-admin@concordia.ca

Applications must be received by no later than 5:00 p.m. on Monday January 15, 2018.

Performing Arts Librarian at Reed College in Portland, OR

The Reed College Library seeks a performing arts librarian to collaborate closely with the faculty and students of the dance, music, and theatre academic programs, supporting teaching, creative work, and research activities in the performing arts. This role interacts frequently with Reed students, faculty, and staff as well as members of the public, manage collections including media and scores, and deliver course-related instruction and research assistance.  The performing arts librarian manages the Performing Arts Resource Center’s library services, hiring, training, and supervising library staff and students as well as coordinating with instructional technology staff who share the Performing Arts Resource Center space. This position participates with other librarians in providing general research assistance and library instruction to the Reed community.

Core responsibilities for this position include providing instruction, research assistance, and conducting outreach activities in support of the Performing Arts disciplines (Music, Theatre, and Dance); managing the library services provided by the Performing Arts Resource Center (PARC), including circulation of collections and equipment, as well as hiring, training, and managing library staff and student assistants at the PARC; providing leadership and expertise in the acquisition and management, and use of collections that support the performing arts. As a Reed College librarian, this position actively participates in professional activities of the library and the college by leading or serving on committees, providing training and educational opportunities for staff, and developing and maintaining connections with local, regional, and national professional communities.

The successful candidate will be knowledgeable about research and practice in the performing arts; have experience with the creation, organization, and use of audio and video media, scores, and other collections relating to the performing arts; and have the ability to collaborate with others and manage multiple priorities. Passion for student success, organization skills, attention to detail, and the ability to communicate well across diverse audiences are essential. They will also have a strong interest in contributing to the library’s research assistance, instruction, and outreach initiatives including promoting the use of library collections and services in the undergraduate curriculum, particularly in the performing arts.

How to Apply / Contact
For a complete job description, application instructions, and more information about the Reed College, please see: http://jobs.reed.edu/positions/performing-arts-librarian.html

Materials Collection at The University of Michigan

Image of Materials Collection
Image by Sara Samuels

Libraries hold all types of things other than just books. The University of Michigan’s Art, Architecture, and Engineering Library is just one of several academic art libraries that has a Materials Collection. Comprised of around 800 samples, the collection is meant to inspire artists and designers by giving them the opportunity to touch and experience different materials in real life. Most of the collection comes from a materials consultancy company called Material Connexion, but the library adds items by request, too. Its curator, librarian Rebecca Price, hopes that with the growth of the collection and increasing awareness of its existence, more students and faculty will reach out and make requests for materials to purchase.

Image of Materials Collection
Image by Joanna Thielen

Most use of the Materials Collection comes from students and faculty in Architecture or Art & Design programs. Classes have used the collection to create sustainable packaging designs and signage assignments, just to name a few examples. The collection was also used by students in the Dance department who were searching for an iridescent material for costumes. The library will be loaning out some of the collection to be on display at college makerspace, hopefully sparking more interest in the collection.

Snail excrement material
Material made from snail excrement (Image by Sara Samuels)

You can learn more about The University of Michigan’s Materials Collection here. Some other universities I found that house similar collections are Princeton, Harvard, Kendall College of Art and Design, and The University of Utah.

Job Opportunity: Head Librarian – Saint Louis Art Museum

JOB DESCRIPTION: HEAD LIBRARIAN (Exempt, Grade M)

REPORTS TO: Director of Learning and Engagement

SUPERVISES: Technical Services Librarian, Archivist, Public Services Librarian

SPECIFICATIONS: ALA-accredited Master’s degree in Library Science, three to five years administrative experience in an academic or museum library, and extensive knowledge of art history and art literature required. Master’s degree in art history and working knowledge of two European languages preferred. Position requires awareness of administrative practices in special libraries, especially acquisitions, financial management, and library systems.

JOB PURPOSE: To direct the staff and operations of the Richardson Memorial Library at the Saint Louis Art Museum; to administer Library activities in the areas of reference, circulation control, collection development, acquisitions, collection maintenance, and organization of materials; to manage the Library budget; and to create planning procedures for long-term policy development.

DUTIES, WORK PERFORMED:

  • Establishes goals and objectives for the Library which further the mission of the Museum and the Division of Learning and Engagement.
  • Directs all Library reference services to Museum staff members and public patrons. Schedules and monitors the reference desk. Provides instruction to staff and volunteers in the use of library research materials.
  • Guides all Library technical services activities. Plans for future growth of the collection and approves materials for acquisition. Monitors staff activity in the organization of materials, including archival records, digital images, periodicals, books, and auction catalogues. Oversees collection maintenance activities, including preservation, shelving, digitization, de-accessioning, and offsite storage of materials. Develops the Library record-keeping procedures.
  • Prepares and manages the Library’s budget, tracking expenditures and reporting variances.
  • Supervises, trains, and evaluates Library staff and volunteers.
  • Plans for technological changes, as necessary for efficient access to library materials and information about art.
  • Establishes effective communication with the Museum’s administration through written reports and regular meetings.
  • Represents the Library as the institutional liaison with library consortia.
  • Collaborates with Membership, Development, and Curatorial departments as well as other Learning & Engagement departments on the planning of projects and programs.
  • Participates in the Museum’s cross-functional strategic and core function teams as appropriate.
  • Promotes a positive image of the Library to the public, donors, volunteers, and other library professionals.
  • Maintains an awareness of trends and developments in the fields of art and art historical scholarship and publishing, and mentors library staff on their impact on the profession.
  • Other duties as assigned by supervisor.

The above statements of this job description describe the general duties and level of work performed by employees assigned to this position. They do not claim to describe all of the functions of this position. Employees may be assigned other duties and the essential functions may change or be changed from time to time. (06/17)

Please apply online at https://www.hiretrue.com/hiretrue/showJobBoardPositions.do?jobBoardPK=54.

Fine and Performing Arts Librarian at Wayne State University

Librarian I/II/III

Learning & Research Support:  Fine and Performing Arts Librarian

Employment Security Status Track Appointment

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS: The Fine and Performing Arts Librarian reports to the Associate Dean, University Libraries, and serves the faculty and students in the College of Fine, Performing and Communication Arts, including the Departments of Art & Art History, Communication, Music, and Theater & Dance.  Additional subject areas within the humanities and social sciences may be assigned as appropriate.  The Fine and Performing Arts Librarian offers discipline-specific instruction, intensive discipline-specific research consultations, and discipline-specific reference assistance; serves as a resource for information on scholarly communication and copyright; and serves as a member of the libraries’ Instruction Team, with a focus on building students’ information literacy and research skills.  The full breadth of the position’s responsibilities remains flexible and adaptable to new and emerging staffing models, schedules, and technologies.

This position supports the Wayne State University mission to create and advance knowledge, prepare a diverse student body to thrive, and positively impact local and global communities. Wayne State students, staff, and faculty strive to overcome historical and divisive biases in our society. A successful Fine and Performing Arts Librarian must embrace an environment of inclusion that moves beyond simple tolerance to recognizing the richness in individual identities of people, and diverse perspectives.

REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS: ALA-accredited master’s degree in library and information science; strong commitment to teaching and public service; talent to communicate and interact effectively with faculty, staff, and students in a culturally diverse and rapidly changing environment; skills to analyze, organize, and present information; demonstrated aptitude to manage multiple priorities and tasks; capacity to work independently or as a team member, and to communicate effectively with non-technical staff, vendors and other campus technology staff; familiarity with current trends in library technology along with the ability to apply this knowledge to a local situation.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS: Academic library experience; experience with literature in the arts or an undergraduate or advanced degree in the fine and performing arts or related field; library instruction experience; skills in using technologies to enhance instruction; experience in providing reference services, user education, information literacy, database searching, and in developing print and online instructional materials and tutorials; familiarity with current trends and issues in digital humanities and immersive technologies, such as makerspaces; experience with at least one of the leading learning management systems; established record or potential for professional achievement and service.

The Campus and University Libraries: The University Library System includes Learning and Research Support Services; Collection Management; Discovery Services; the Vera Shiffman Medical Library; the Arthur Neef Law Library; the Walter P. Reuther Library and Archives and Library Administrative Services. The School of Library and Information Science also reports to the Dean.  For more information, please visit: http://www.library.wayne.edu

Wayne State University Libraries

www.library.wayne.edu

The online resources and services of the Wayne State University Libraries

Salary & Benefits: Salary and rank: commensurate with education and experience.  Wayne State offers dental and health plan options, TIAA/CREF or Fidelity, tuition assistance for employees and family members, relocation assistance and liberal vacation benefits.

Application Procedure: Please submit electronically to posting #042775 a complete resume and letter of interest including the names, addresses, telephone numbers, and e-mail addresses of at least three professional references to: Wayne State University’s ON-LINE HIRING SYSTEM at https://jobs.wayne.edu.  Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.  Candidates should also provide evidence, in application materials, of a commitment to fostering and engaging with a diversity of ideas and experiences, which creates an inclusive environment in the classroom and at the University.  Please contact Cynthia Krolikowski, Librarian IV, Special Collections, University Library System for additional information regarding the position at ac4979@wayne.edu.

Job Opportunity: Assistant Librarian for Public Services (search re-opened), The Frick Reference Library, NYC

Background

The Frick Collection is an art museum consisting of more than 1,100 works of art from the thirteenth to the nineteenth century, displayed in the intimate surroundings of the former home of Henry Clay Frick. The residence, with its furnishings and works of art, has been open to the public since 1935. The Frick Art Reference Library is an internationally-recognized research library that serves as one of the most complete resources for the study of Western art. Founded in 1920, the Library today holds of more than one million study photographs, 285,000 books, 80,000 auction catalogs, and 2,250 periodical titles. It is open to interested individuals from all over the world.

Summary and Responsibilities

Provides on-site and remote (telephone, e-mail, letter, and fax) reference services to the public and staff; uses online circulation and paging system (Innovative Millennium); assists with the evaluation of resources; assists with department scheduling; assists with Public Services activities and special projects; 35-hour week, some Saturday and evening hours required; reports to the Chief of Public Services.

Qualifications

MLIS, MIS, MLS or equivalent from an ALA-accredited program; academic background in the history of Western art; excellent oral and written communication skills; strong public service orientation; ability to initiate, plan, and implement projects, independently and as a member of a team; familiarity with the digital humanities and reading knowledge of one or more Western European language desirable.

Benefits in Employment with The Frick Collection

Full-time employees are eligible to participate in group life, health, dental insurance plans. Employees contribute to the cost of their health insurance based on income level and type of coverage selected. Other benefits include Short & Long Term Disability insurance, employee contributed tax deferred annuity, flexible spending plans for health, dependent care and commuting costs, generous pension plan with participation after one year of service/vesting after five years of service, 13 paid holidays, and accrual of 12 vacation days the first year of employment (25 days beginning year 2). All employees of the Frick Collection may access free or discounted admission to most of New York’s finest museums. The Frick provides employees and volunteers with a discount on Museum Shop purchases and an on-site employee dining service. The Frick Collection offers a beautiful and pleasant work setting and an excellent opportunity to appreciate some of the world’s finest works of art.

Application Process

Inquiries without salary requirements will not be considered. 

Please send resume with salary requirements/history to:

Chief of Public Services
The Frick Collection
1 East 70st Street
New York, NY 10021
Fax 212-879-2091

Email to: jobs@frick.org(link sends e-mail) (include “Assistant Librarian for Public Services” in subject line of email)

No phone calls, please.

Source: http://www.frick.org/careers/assistant_librarian_for_public_services_1