Harnessing Data Visualization to Teach Emerging Art Scholars: Methods and Ideas for Instruction

As art librarians and students, we are especially aware of how digital resources and the Internet have changed art scholarship. I find myself recommending academic streaming music databases to performing arts students who, ten years ago, would have had access only to CD recordings; For a close-up look at The Scream painted by Edvard Munch, I send students to Artstor before digging out a print catalog; When developing library instruction sessions, I nearly always use a digital presentation component like Google Slides or a video tutorial hosted by Vimeo or YouTube. But, one of the emerging digital trends in academia that I find most engrossing is data visualization or information visualization.

As Autumn Wetli discussed in her ArLiSNAP article The Practice and Problems of Digital Art History, several digital programs exist that allow art historians to analyze research text, data, or image collections and then present visual representations of that information or findings therein (Wetli, 2017). This is data visualization. Elegantly explained by data visualization specialist Alberto Cairo, a visualization is “a graphical representation designed to enable exploration, analysis, and communication” (Cairo, 2017).

 

For art researchers, the application of data visualization in a digital environment offers infinite possibilities. Graphs, charts, data maps, and other visualizations, when incorporated into research, can make an article more appealing or make an argument more persuasive (Cairo, 2017). And, in the age of interactive and socially engaging digital media, scholars who study art are at a unique advantage to produce colorful, media-rich, graphically stunning visualizations. (Glassman & Dyki, 2017).

 

Apart from the potential of art scholars to integrate images of art into their visualizations, the changing nature of scholarly publishing in the fine arts signals an era of change for how data is represented in art scholarship and how art researchers can move forward in an informed way. In a 2017 article entitled “Beyond the monograph? Transformations in scholarly communication and their impact on art librarianship,” Patrick Tomlin details many of these changes. Digital models of publication present an advantage due to the potential for institutions to take greater control of internal publishing, the benefit of open access, the increasing cost of full-color print monographs, and the growing importance of search engine discovery (Tomlin, 2017). From the perspectives of emerging art librarians who will take an active role in research and instruction, having a basic understanding of data visualization and its increasing presence in the world of digital art history is crucial.

 

To facilitate a basic understanding of how one might introduce data visualization to new art scholars, I have compiled this guide. These ideas serve as an introduction to data visualization for both the librarian and the researcher, who together can learn to apply existing knowledge of art scholarship towards this goal.

 

First: It is advantageous for the instruction librarian to introduce (or re-introduce) students to the principles of visual literacy. To create one’s own visualizations, scholars should be well-versed in visual communication. Online tools like Image Atlas may serve to prepare students to understand bias and perspective in images (Bailey & Pregill, 2014, p. 183). I will link below to a 2012 article by Tammy Ravas and Megan Stark which provides an informative case study in teaching “the ethics of seeing” (Ravas & Stark, 2012, p. 41). Instructors may find that integrating visual literacy lessons into existing information literacy lesson plans bolsters students’ understanding of visual literacy when applied to the eventual creation of their own data visualizations (Ravas & Stark, 2012, p. 35).

 

Second: Just as digital art history scholars should be visually literate, they should also be data literate. In his 2017 lecture at the Cornell University Library, Alberto Cairo details a study from the Pew Research Center, which concludes that many people who read articles that contain data visualizations do not know how to correctly read scatter plots, bar graphs, and line charts (Cairo, 2017). Though this study focuses upon popular media, the importance of an understanding of the interpretation of data can not be understated for scholarly communities. In a 2012 article in Art Documentation, Victoria Szabo emphasizes the value of data literate art historians who know how to use and organize data. She states that “Faculty and staff technical advisors sometimes unfamiliar with the research domain, even if experienced in humanities collaborations more generally, may not realize the extent to which their biases and assumptions for how to clean and standardize data could compromise the intellectual integrity of a project. Variant spellings, for example, could be important in tracing the provenance of a particular art object” (Szabo, 2012, p. 171). Interdepartmental collaborations with information technology staff may allow librarians and art faculty to learn more about data management programs, software, methods, and training.

 

Third: Creating one’s own data visualizations does not mean learning how to program Java or code HTML. For art historians who are just learning how to create visualizations, there are a number of free programs which exist to assist them. It may be beneficial to design instructional lesson plans around visualization software with which students are already familiar. I would suggest choosing a sample research topic within a class curriculum to be plotted in Google Maps. Topics like “locations of art auction houses in Paris” or “art galleries in New York during the Harlem Renaissance” may serve to develop simple exercises that illicit broader understandings of in-class research. Paul Glassman and Judy Dyki’s Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship, 2nd edition, contains several resources on using map plotting in art history research.

 

Once students have outgrown this more familiar tool, they can move on to greater objectives, like creating visualizations using the immense capabilities of Google Charts. They can practice embedding these visualizations into Wikis, LibGuides, or social media. And, they can explore increasingly sophisticated tools like ImagePlot while developing their comfort level with visualization technology.

 

Data visualization may seem like a daunting undertaking for researchers who have been educated mostly in text-based scholarship. But, the implications of having an understanding of visualizations in digital art history are immense. For art librarians who are increasingly tasked with the education of scholars in a digital field, I hope that the tools and ideas I have outlined may provide a basis of knowledge for teaching this emerging technology. I truly believe that, if introduced to the field of data visualization within the parameters of their understanding of visual literacy, data, and art scholarship, researchers will learn to be excited about the potential of data visualization to enhance and embellish their research work.

 

Bibliography/Further Reading

 

Bailey, J., & Pregill, L. (2014). Speak to the Eyes: The History and Practice of Information Visualization. Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, 33(2), 168-191. doi:10.1086/678525

 

Cairo, A. (2017, October 13). Visual Trumpery. Lecture presented at Cornell University Library, Ithaca, New York. Retrieved January 2, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EnzNfPAzCSc

 

Glassman, P., & Dyki, J. (Eds.). (2017). The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship (2nd ed.). Chicago, IL: ALA Neal-Schuman.

 

Ravas, T., & Stark, M. (2012). Pulitzer Prize Winning Photographs and Visual Literacy at The University of Montana. Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, 31(1), 34-44. doi:10.1086/665334

 

Szabo, V. (2012). Transforming Art History Research with Database Analytics: Visualizing Art Markets. Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, 31(2), 158-175. doi:10.1086/668109

 

Tomlin, P. (2017). Beyond the monograph? Transformations in scholarly communication and their impact on art librarianship. In The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship (2nd ed., pp. 213-224). Chicago, IL: ALA Neal-Schuman.

 

Wetli, A. (2017, December 22). The Practice and Problems of Digital Art History [Web log post]. Retrieved January 4, 2018, from http://arlisnap.arlisna.org/2017/12/the-practice-and-problems-of-digital-art-history/

A Success Story: An Interview with Coral Salomón, NDSR Fellow at The University of Pennsylvania Fisher Fine Arts Library

Can you tell us a little bit about your background, your current position, and how you got into the field of art librarianship?
Hello ARLIS/NA!,

I’m from Puerto Rico, but I moved to Boston when I was 18 to obtain my BA in International Relations. After that, I worked for a few years as a project manager in New York City’s translation industry.

I loved NYC’s wealth of cultural heritage institutions and as the years passed, I realized that I wanted to work within that sector. I stumbled upon Pratt Institute’s MLIS curriculum and decided that library school was the right fit for me.

I entered the field of art librarianship thanks to one of the cultural heritage institutions I admired from afar. I was fortunate to obtain a fellowship through Pratt at the Frick Art Reference Library where I was part of NYARC’s web archiving program. It was an incredible experience and I learned a lot from my supervisors, colleagues, and by working within the walls of The Frick Collection. Even though I’ve moved on to a different role, I feel a lot of gratitude towards The Frick. They made me feel like family since day 1 and gave me the confidence to pursue this specialty, even though I don’t have a formal background in the arts.

I’m currently the National Digital Stewardship Resident at the University of Pennsylvania Fisher Fine Arts Library. My yearlong IMLS-funded residency focuses on tackling issues pertaining to the preservation of digital artwork and art information.

You can read more about my project and my cohorts’ projects here.

What does a typical day at work look like for you? What work are you doing as an NDSR art resident?
My project has three components:
• Creating guidelines for a web archiving program focused on the arts.
• Providing repository recommendations for born-digital artworks and art resources produced at Penn.
• Writing a white paper on the acquisition and preservation of publications hosted on apps, YouTube, podcasts, and other untraditional digital platforms.

I’ve been interviewing a lot of people here at Penn to get a better sense of what are the needs of the community. A typical day might include interviewing professors in the fine arts department, curators, museum library directors or artists working on projects affiliated with Penn. I type my notes and then create a small summary of the conversations in a spreadsheet.

I’ve also been meeting with fellow Penn librarians and digital archivists to gather their recommendations and avoid siloing my work. Librarians, archivists, and new media scholars at other institutions have also generously offered me advice and discussed best practices in relation to my project.

So, my typical day involves a lot of listening and typing! Next semester, I’ll begin implementing some of the lessons I’ve learned during the past 4.5 months.

One achievement that I’m proud of is the mapathon for Puerto Rico disaster relief Penn Libraries hosted. I helped organize it, and while it doesn’t fall neatly within art librarianship, it’s an example of how libraries can rise to action in times of need. I was blown away by the student participation and the institution’s support.

Do you have any advice for current students and/or those on the job market?
My advice for current students is to seek out internships or part/full-time jobs in the field while they’re still in school. Internships make life financially difficult, so try to apply to ones that pay or to funds like the ARLIS/NA Wolfgang M. Freitag Internship Award which provide financial support to students seeking out unpaid opportunities.

For those on the job market: apply to your dream jobs, even if you think you’re not qualified. Keep on blogging, going to events, get coffee with people working in the profession, all those things your professors told you to do. Also, networking is not evil. I thought networking was terrible when I was younger, but now I’ve realized it’s just about reaching out to people that are cool and are doing admirable things within this line of work.

I know this is easier said than done, but don’t take job rejections personally. I’ve been surprised that I’ve connected with people (in a positive way!) who’ve turned down my job application. Always thank people and, if you get a human-generated rejection, ask what factors influenced the hiring decision. Sometimes people reply and you get really good advice–I got better at writing cover letters thanks to a kind rejection.

Remember, you are an awesome person and the market does not determine your worth! If anyone wants more specific advice, feel free to tweet me at @csalinphilly!

What were/are some challenges for you as an art librarian? Are these related to larger challenges in art librarianship?
The attack against net neutrality is a huge challenge. Art libraries are boundary-pushers in the effort to preserve and provide access to our digital cultural heritage, as demonstrated by our web archiving programs. This measure, which endangers the openness of the internet and threatens to increase the digital divide, imperils our work and the ability of the public to access our collections and materials. As librarians and archivists, an open and democratic web is vital to ensure we can provide information to all.

Tell us something fun about yourself! What do you do in your spare time? If you could take a trip to visit any library in the world, which would it be?
I really like to bike and luckily Philly is a great biking city.

I also enjoy exploring museums. This year I saw some really great exhibits, including the Whitney’s survey of Hélio Oiticica’s work and the Guggenheim’s Agnes Martin retrospective. I also enjoyed Philadelphia’s public art project, Monument Lab. The pieces were really thoughtful and offered a fun way of getting to know the city.

Someday, I would like to visit the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí, Cuba’s national library. Cuba and Puerto Rico were the last outposts of the Spanish empire in the Caribbean, and I wonder what tales of our combined history are safeguarded there.

Job Posting / Teaching & Research Librarian Fine Arts / Concordia University / Montreal, Quebec

Teaching & Research Librarian Fine Arts – Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec

Concordia University Library seeks a dynamic and innovative librarian for a tenure-track position as Teaching & Research Librarian – Fine Arts.

Concordia University is one of Canada’s most dynamic universities in one of North America’s most livable cities. It reflects a unique blend of commitments to diversity, accessibility, social responsibility, and innovation. With over 45,000 students (7,439 international) and over 2,000 full-time and part-time professors, Concordia is recognized for offering a rich academic experience combined with strong community engagement.

Concordia University Library provides collections and services fundamental to academic success, creation, the advancement of knowledge, and lifelong learning. With a team of 120 librarians, professionals and support staff who put student and faculty success at the centre of their practice, the Library collaborates to achieve the goals outlined in our strategic plan and in the University’s strategic framework and directions. For more information about the services and operations of the Library, see http://library.concordia.ca/.

The Teaching & Research Librarian – Fine Arts is a member of the Library’s professional team, reporting to the Associate University Librarian, Research & Graduate Studies. The incumbent provides support for teaching, learning and research activities in the visual and fine arts to enable and facilitate exploration, knowledge creation and learning. The incumbent develops and implements initiatives to support the use of digital tools for research and teaching and contributes substantively to a variety of Library and University strategic initiatives and projects, through committees, working groups, and project teams. Responsibilities also include research, publication and service to meet requirements for tenure and promotion.

Librarians are members of the Concordia University Faculty Association (CUFA).

RESPONSIBILITIES

Continually develops knowledge of information and media resources within the visual and fine arts and acts as a resource person for librarians, staff, faculty and students.

Provides research help and consultations regarding the discovery and use of information and media resources within the visual and fine arts.

Continually develops knowledge of teaching and learning practices in higher education generally, and in the disciplinary context of the visual and fine arts.

Prepares and delivers curricular and co-curricular instruction for classroom, library and online learning environments.

Develops a thorough familiarity with all aspects of the research and research-creation lifecycle within the visual and fine arts including research methods, research-creation, digital tools, scholarly communication and research data management.

Advises and collaborates with faculty, students and colleagues to facilitate research and, research-creation activities, digital scholarship, data management and scholarly outputs in the visual and fine arts.

Develops and manages digital and print collections in assigned visual and fine arts subject areas.

Participates in collection evaluation, development and management, in consultation with faculty, librarians, and the Associate University Librarian, Collection Services.

Coordinates and contributes to the Library’s exhibits.

Participates on committees, working groups and project teams to contribute to the development of Library and University strategic initiatives and projects.

Contributes to local, regional and national initiatives and projects

QUALIFICATIONS

Professional expertise

A graduate degree from a library school accredited by the American Library Association, or approved equivalent education and training acceptable for membership in the Corporation of Professional Librarians of Québec.

An undergraduate degree and/or graduate degree in the visual or fine arts or in a related discipline is an asset.

Extensive and authoritative knowledge of information resources and sources in a variety of media available to subject areas within the visual and fine arts.

Knowledge of the research and research-creation lifecycles within the visual and fine arts.

Demonstrated ability to develop and deliver effective instructional activities.

Knowledge of scholarly communication models and practices including open access, institutional repositories, and research data management.

Knowledge of research communication and collaboration tools as well as digital scholarship tools (such as data visualization, timeline, mapping, online exhibits, text mining) and the ability to advise on their value and use.

Knowledge of collections development and management issues, concepts and methods in academic libraries.

General Competencies

Demonstrated ability to develop successful partnerships and relationships with faculty and researchers.

Demonstrated project management skills and ability to handle multiple priorities and tasks as well as projects.

Strong motivation, aptitude and interest to establish student and faculty success as the centre of their professional practice.

Ability to work both independently and collaboratively, share expertise, work in teams and negotiate solutions with diverse groups.

Excellent communication skills. Strong analytical and creative problem-solving skills.

Curiosity, drive and flexibility so as to discover and try new things, in support of Library and University strategic directions.

Oral and written fluency in English is essential. Oral fluency in French and basic written French are assets.

Salary and Benefits

Compensation and rank are commensurate with qualifications and experience. The position includes a competitive and comprehensive benefit package.

Concordia University is committed to employment equity.

Application Procedure

Interested candidates must supply the following in one (1) single PDF attachment

·         a letter of interest;

·         curriculum vitae, which must include a statement of your citizenship;

·         the names, email addresses and telephone numbers of three professional references.

 All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority. Only selected candidates will be contacted. Interviews are planned for the week of February 5, 2018. The anticipated position start date will be June 1, 2018.

Candidates should apply in confidence by email to Ms. Sandra Biron, Library Personnel Assistant, at lib-admin@concordia.ca

Applications must be received by no later than 5:00 p.m. on Monday January 15, 2018.

The Aspiring Academic Art Librarian: Decoding the Mystery of Tenure-Track Job Postings

If you are an art librarian or aspiring art librarian on the hunt for a job, you may have encountered a tenure-track job posting at some point in your search. When speaking to colleagues, friends, and peers in the field of art librarianship I have found that many emerging professionals find themselves unprepared to understand, or to market themselves as candidates for, these faculty status library jobs. For those librarians interested in pursuing academic work, a broad understanding of faculty librarianship can be beneficial in a multitude of ways. For these reasons, I have compiled a brief “beginner’s introduction” to faculty librarianship and applying for tenure-track library jobs, accompanied by a short bibliography of web resources for the job-hunting academic art librarian.

Firstly, if you are unfamiliar with the academic process of tenure, a description of this process is available through the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). This can be found in the accompanying bibliography. You may also find the ACRL’s Joint Statement on on Faculty Status of College and University Librarians to be helpful. According to the latter, librarians who are hired into a tenure-track positions are afforded the opportunity to gain all the benefits of faculty status, including “corresponding entitlement to rank, promotion, tenure, compensation, leaves, and research funds” (“A Guideline for the Appointment, Promotion and Tenure of Academic Librarians,” 2006). This means that if seeking tenure-track library work, one should be prepared to engage in professional development activities and conduct research in their field of library expertise in exchange for the opportunity to achieve tenure status.

Secondly, if you are interested in applying to a tenure-track library position but want to know more about the responsibilities inherent in such a position, you should understand that the qualifications for rank, compensation, and promotion of tenure-track librarians vary widely from institution to institution. I took this opportunity to speak to three librarians at different stages in their careers (two in art librarianship and one in academic librarianship, but not the arts) in order to acquire a variety of examples of experiences with different institutions’ tenure policies. For the sake of privacy I have chosen to keep the names of my interviewees anonymous. All three of these librarians have found that each institution seems to have its own timeline for evaluations of tenure-track librarians. For example, one school might evaluate tenure-track librarians for promotion to tenure every three years while another might evaluate them every five years. During this review process the librarian hopes to be approved for tenure, but if not approved, risks termination. Research and professional development budgets, publishing requirements, and time allotted to conduct research also vary.

Thirdly, one must realize that within the field of librarianship there are many varying opinions on what faculty status means for librarians. Librarians who are interested in conducting research and publishing scholarly literature within the field are better suited to tenure-track positions than those who prefer not to be responsible for this type of work. Anyone can apply for these jobs, but there is no guarantee of achieving tenure status. Perhaps one of the most beneficial steps one can take before submitting an application to a tenure-track position is to seek out the tenure requirements and policies of the institution to which they are applying. These policies are frequently available on the institution’s website (though be sure to verify that you are reading the tenure requirements for librarians, and not for other faculty). These outlines can provide invaluable insight into whether the position in question is right for you.

General Resources

Academic Librarianship. (n.d.). Retrieved December 12, 2017, from https://www.kent.edu/iSchool/academic-librarianship

“A Guideline for the Appointment, Promotion and Tenure of Academic Librarians”, American Library Association, September 6, 2006.

“Association of College and Research Libraries Joint Statement on Faculty Status of College and University Librarians”, American Library Association, September 6, 2006.

Johnson, H. (2016, May 3). A Tip of the Hat to Tenure: Realizations in my First Year [Web log post]. Retrieved December 12, 2017, from http://acrlog.org/2016/05/03/a-tip-of-the-hat-to-tenure-realizations-in-my-first-year/

Romanowski, C. A. (2015). First-time faculty librarian, first year experience: Overcoming tenure fears. College & Research Libraries News, 76(11). Retrieved December 12, 2017, from http://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/article/view/9414/10616

“Securing an Academic Librarian Position”, American Library Association, November 10, 2009.

Sample Institutional Tenure Policies
 

Indiana University Bloomington

Penn State University Libraries

University at Albany, State Universities of New York

University of Georgia

University Librarian at University of North Carolina School of the Arts, Winston-Salem NC

The University Library provides materials and services which support the University of North Carolina School of the Arts’ educational, artistic, and performance objectives, and which serve the intellectual, informational, and cultural needs of the students, faculty, and staff of the school, as well as other members of the local community. The University Librarian provides leadership for the library with the following:

– Responsible for hiring, performance management and professional development of library personnel. Directly and indirectly supervises 7 professional librarians and 8 support staff, providing leadership that fosters a positive rapport and a collaborative spirit among all library employees.

– Oversees Access Services, University Archives, Benjamin F. Ward Music Library, Reference, Systems, and Technical Services.

– Directs the exploration, development, and implementation of innovative services and tools that provide high quality, user‐focused learning experiences and foster student success.

– Promotes assessment strategies and data‐informed decision making, enhancing support for future choices and changes in library service.

– Leads processes by which the library is integrated into the campus community, working to support the curricula, student learning outcomes and the goals of the university.

– Collaborates with library colleagues and the Provost in long‐range planning and budgeting for the library.

– Enhances financial support for the library through the pursuit of proposals and grants.

Minimum Qualifications

aster’s degree in Library/Information Science from an ALA-accredited institution with a demonstrated record of at least 5 years of successful, progressively responsible library leadership at the academic/university level.

Preferred Qualifications 

– Arts background

– Experience developing capacity for new and emerging areas of library focus – e.g. user experience, digital preservation, data collection, assessment, and digital scholarship.

– Experience acquiring funding through a diverse array of sources, including institutional funds, grant-writing, and fundraising

Project Archivist at the Center for Creative Photography at The University of Arizona

The Library Information Associate, Senior (Project Archivist) will support the archives staff with surveying, processing, and describing two large, complex, keystone archival collections: the W. Eugene Smith archive and the Witkin Gallery archive. By completing this project, there will be improved intellectual and physical control, increased visibility and access to these collections, and ensured collection longevity. Essential functions will include: surveying the collections to identify processing and preservation issues; improving under-processed collections; refining finding aids to meet archival standards; rehousing and preservation; and authoring and publishing EADfinding aids online. This is an Extended Temporary Employment position.

The Center for Creative Photography (CCP) is the premiere research collection of American photographic fine art and archives, promoting creative inquiry, dialogue, and appreciation of photography’s enduring cultural influence. The Center for Creative Photography is a world-renowned leader in preservation, teaching, learning, scholarship, and the appreciation of archival material and works of art by North America’s greatest photographers.

With more than $606 million in research and development dollars from federal, state, and private sources, The University of Arizona currently ranks #21 among public universities in the US in overall research expenditures and #2 in physical science research. With world class faculty in fields as diverse as astronomy and space exploration, plant science, biomedical science and biotechnology, anthropology, Native peoples, business, law, philosophy, music, and dance, the UA is one of only 62 members in the Association of American Universities. The University’s main campus is situated in the heart of Tucson. Surrounded by mountains and the high Sonoran Desert, Tucson boasts a distinctive southwestern feel and enjoys more than 300 days of sunshine each year.

Duties & Responsibilities:

  • Complete collection-level surveys on the W. Eugene Smith and Witkin Gallery archives
  • Advance intellectual and physical control over the materials by improving the arrangement, organization, and description of collection materials
  • Discuss proposed changes with archives staff
  • Rehouse materials as necessary
  • Improve finding aids to follow archival best practices and standards (DACS)
  • Author EAD finding aids using Oxygen XML editor and publish online
  • Link collections to subject guides available on the CCP website
  • Additional duties may be assigned

Knowledge, Skills, & Abilities:

  • Thorough knowledge of Encoded Archival Description
  • Strong organizational skills, attention to detail, and ability to follow complex guidelines
  • Demonstrated excellent verbal and written communication skills
  • Ability to demonstrate proper care and handling of materials
  • Ability to work independently with self-initiative and minimal supervision

Minimum Qualifications:

In addition to ABOR Minimum Qualifications listed below:

  • Previous processing experience in an archives repository
    (EAD), DACS guidelines, and other archival standards and best practices
  • Excellent computer proficiency (Microsoft Office, XML editors, collection management systems)

Preferred Qualifications:

  • ALA-accredited Master’s degree in Library/ Information Science
  • Grant proposal writing experience
  • Knowledge of the history of photography, including the identification of photographic processes
  • Experience working in an academic research library, scholarly special collection, or large research organization

For more information & to apply please look here. Applicants are encourage to apply until November 12, 2017 with reviews beginning November 3, 2017.

Assistant Director, Visual Resources Center, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Summary of Unit Job Duties:

Under the general supervision of the Associate Director of Visual Resources Center, provide professional, relevant, and effective outreach and support for scholarship to faculty, students, and other members of the University community. Work closely with faculty and students to integrate digital images and relevant technologies into the research and pedagogical activities of the Art History Department and Humanities Division. Collaborate effectively with the Associate Director to develop and implement policies and workflows and to assist in all aspects of the daily operation and development of the Visual Resources Center. Catalog, develop, maintain, and administer digital collections. Oversee the work of part-time student and other temporary employees.

Detail of Unit Job Duties:

Metadata Creation and Maintenance. With a user-oriented perspective, create authority-based, original, image catalog records in relational database. Implement and maintain metadata and content standards in image catalog and image archive. Perform quality-control for all records in multiple image databases. In collaboration with Associate Director, develop appropriate metadata display templates. Research and acquire material to fill image orders and develop the VRC’s collections to support current curricular needs and research interests. Assist in training and supervising part-time student cataloging staff.

Digital Collection Management. In collaboration with Associate Director, maintain digital archive and digital collections in the LUNA database. Assist with digital collection management workflows for scanners and digital copy stand photography to ensure efficient processes and timely delivery of images to faculty and students. Participate in ongoing dialogue with patrons to maintain high usability standards for all VRC collections. Maintain, troubleshoot, and perform quality-control, including color fidelity testing, for digital files, delivery systems, and imaging technology. Keep accurate administrative records. Assist in training and supervising part-time student scanning staff.

Instruction and Outreach. Serve as a primary point of contact for patrons of the Visual Resources Center. Develop and deliver specialized training for digital media and related technology to faculty, students, and staff, in groups and individually, including student employee training sessions, classroom instruction sessions, online tutorials, and reference guides. Promote awareness of Visual Resources Center services, digitization equipment, projects, and resources via social media outlets and Center website.

For more information visit the UChicago Jobs Employment Site at https://jobopportunities.uchicago.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/position/JobDetails_css.jsp?postingId=682568.

Instructional Design Librarian – Ringling College of Art and Design, Sarasota, FL

The Library: Starting a new chapter in our history, we have recently opened an $18 million, state-of-the-art library that seeks to transform the way students engage with our collections and services. Architecturally stunning, the very building itself is designed to adapt and grow with new technologies to come. At 46,000 square feet, the facility has ample room for our extensive collection. The Library houses over 75,000 books, periodicals, and media items and offers access to substantial digital collections in online databases and ebook collections. The Library’s mission is to advance learning and teaching, in and beyond the studio and classroom, consistent with Ringling College’s scholar practitioner philosophy; to enable the College’s institutional mission and strategic goals, in partnership with academic departments, campus support services, and the arts community.

The Position: Ringling College seeks a creative, collaborative, empathetic, and learner-centered professional librarian. The Instructional Design Librarian will utilize teaching and learning pedagogies, educational and emerging technologies, and assessment practices, in close collaboration with faculty partners, in support of the library’s instructional program. The incumbent will work closely with fellow Instructional Design Librarian, collaborate with other librarians and library staff, and partner with teaching faculty in assigned liaison departments in the development of instructional strategies, course design and objectives, and learning outcomes to enhance student learning through both face-to-face instruction and technology-mediated learning resources, including the campus LMS (Canvas), multimedia learning objects, and other emerging technology tools. The Instructional Design Librarian integrates library and open access resources, services, and other tools into the curriculum and plans, carries out, and assesses research instruction in all its forms.

Additional duties include: provide assistance with copyright/intellectual property education and consultations as assigned or directed; participate in print and digital resource acquisition, development, and use; provide research support services and library staff training in research resources; assist faculty in collection development activities; share coordination and supervision of Student Research Consultants with fellow Instructional Design Librarian; and, actively participate in faculty governance, institutional service, outreach efforts, and professional development and leadership.

The ideal candidate will understand the needs of art and design practitioners, be able to effectively connect with students, work directly with faculty in an exciting, evolving curriculum, have experience selecting and providing instructional support for research and professional information resources, and use a variety of social media platforms and emerging technology and software applications to deliver instructional and research services.

Minimum Qualifications:

·         Master’s degree in Library/Information Science from an ALA-accredited institution.

·         Knowledge of and/or experience in an art, art history, creative writing, visual studies, or a design discipline.

·         One year recent successful work experience teaching college-age adults in a university, college, museum, or cultural institution.

·         Experience with and willingness to utilize and promote emerging technologies and technology-mediated instructional methods.

·         Ability to work both independently and as part of a team and to collaborate effectively with faculty and staff colleagues.

·         Ability to plan, implement, and assess work responsibilities.

·         Excellent and effective communication and interpersonal skills.

·         Ability to effectively supervise student assistants.

·         Demonstrated commitment to user-centered library services and ability to work flexibly and creatively with students, faculty, and staff from diverse backgrounds.

·         Ability to support and enhance a diverse learning and working environment.

Preferred Qualifications:

·         Two years recent post-MLS professional librarian work experience.

·         Bachelor’s or master’s degree in a design, studio, art history, or media arts discipline as offered at Ringling College.

·         Knowledge of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, the ARLIS/NA Information Competencies for Students in Design Disciplines, and other relevant information literacy standards and practices.

·         Experience designing effective instructional experiences that accommodate a variety of learning styles.

·         Advanced technology skills, including experience with learning management systems, multiple software platforms, and other digital media delivery systems.

·         Experience with or knowledge of outreach and marketing services in libraries.

·         Recent work experience in a college or university library providing instructional and research services.

·         Experience supervising student assistants.

Application: Send: 1) cover letter of interest addressing specific qualifications for the position; 2) copy of MLS transcripts; 3) résumé/CV; 4) separate statement of teaching philosophy. Submit written materials in PDF format to: https://ringling.simplehire.com Candidates may be asked to submit additional materials if needed.

Deadline: For full consideration, application materials should be submitted by October 22. Review of applications will continue until position is filled.

Ringling College of Art and Design is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Collection Development Librarian – Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Duties & Responsibilities

Harvard University seeks an innovative, collaborative, and user-centered Collection Development Librarian to build and manage collections for one of the leading libraries in the world for the study of art, architecture, and visual culture from antiquity to the present. Reporting to the Herman and Joan Suit Librarian of the Fine Arts Library, the incumbent will select monographs and serials in all formats and work collaboratively with selectors in the Fine Arts Library and across Harvard Library. The incumbent will proactively partner with Harvard Library colleagues to develop creative solutions and efficient workflows for managing, acquiring, processing, and preserving library materials. He/she will actively engage with the visual arts community at Harvard to support innovative use of library collections in their teaching, research, and learning activities. To expand access to the Fine Arts Library’s unparalleled holdings of books, journals, visual resources, and special collections to a wider global audience, the Collection Development Librarian will participate in local, national, and international digital initiatives and collaborative collection development partnerships.

TYPICAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

·         Perform monograph and serial collection development processes in the Fine Arts Library for the Americas, Western Europe and portions of Eastern Europe (from antiquity to 1900), Africa, Australasia, Oceania, and other southern Pacific nations in all formats.

·         Work together with the Librarian and other Fine Arts Library selectors for Islamic, East Asian, Modern and Contemporary, and Special Collections to acquire antiquarian monographs, serials, and primary sources.

·         Ensure effective stewardship of the materials budget, including monitoring acquisition budgets and fund assignments for 8,000-10,000 titles annually, ongoing assessment of budget allocations, establishing target deadlines for ordering materials, and prioritizing requests for endowment and end-of-year purchasing.

·         Actively contribute to relevant Harvard College and Harvard Library collection development working groups, committees, councils, and innovative projects.

·         Maintain and update Fine Arts Library collection policy in consultation with FAL selectors and collection development colleague across the Harvard Libraries.

·         Continuously evaluate print and digital publication trends in art history, architectural history, and the fine and applied arts.

·         Communicate regularly about current and emerging research areas and interests with faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, Harvard Art Museum educators, curators, fellows, and interns, and visiting scholars.

·         Exchange information and best practices proactively with selectors in the Harvard College Library and across the Harvard Libraries for shared purchases, purchase recommendations, and intentional duplication.

·         Contribute to collaborative collection development and digital projects with external partners, e.g., Ivies Art and Architecture Group.

·         Create and maintain in-depth and relevant content for multiple web presences for Fine Arts Library collections and collection-related events and news.

·         Assess collection strengths and correct weaknesses for curricular and research support and create routine and customized acquisitions and collections reports using COGNOS and other tools.

·         Establish and maintain effective and efficient relationships with approval, firm order, and antiquarian vendors and booksellers.

·         Work together with the Librarian and other Fine Arts Library selectors to negotiate and acknowledge gifts of materials and funds.

·         Work proactively and collaboratively with Information Technology Services staff to insure consistent and efficient vendor relations and processing routines.

·         Work proactively and collaboratively with Access Services collection management staff to plan for collection care, and stack space planning, and ongoing transfer of materials to the Harvard Depository.

·         Work proactively and collaboratively with Preservation, Conservation, and Digital Imaging on disaster planning, collections care guidelines, environmental concerns, and digital preservation and access projects.

·         Participates in research services and activities, including contributing to regular hours of support for special collections researchers in collaboration with other librarians. Provides in-depth research consultations and interprets and resolves complex reference questions for library patrons, as needed.

Position will remain posted until filled, however applications will be reviewed beginning November 3, 2017.

At the Harvard Library, our work is enriched by our diverse campus community. Our unique and wide-ranging abilities, experiences, and perspectives are integral to achieving Harvard University’s mission of excellence in research, teaching, and learning for our patrons, our collections, and our workplace. We believe that an inclusive environment that cultivates and promotes understanding, respect, and collaboration across our diverse workforce enables our success.

We encourage individuals with diverse backgrounds, experiences and abilities to apply to be a part of our community of over 700 staff members. Our work with faculty, students and researchers to explore answers to intellectual questions, enduring and new, and to seek solutions to the world’s most consequential problems, requires that we not only reflect, but also champion our diverse society.

A global leader, the Harvard Library is a pre-eminent research library that acquires, disseminates, and preserves knowledge. Harvard’s Library holdings range from traditional print collections to rapidly expanding inventories of digital resources. It is the work of the Harvard Library to provide the University’s faculty, students, and researchers-now and in the future-with comprehensive access over time to all of these materials.

Learn more about our contributions to the academic enterprise by visiting us at http://lib.harvard.edu/about-usand about the Harvard University community at http://hr.harvard.edu/why-harvard.

The Harvard Library is a proud member of the ACRL Diversity Alliance.

Job Function
Library

Sub Unit
————

Location
USA – MA – Cambridge

Department
Harvard College Library – Fine Arts Library

Time Status
Full-time

Union
00 – Non Union, Exempt or Temporary

Salary Grade
057

Pre-Employment Screening
Criminal, Education, Identity

EEO Statement
We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, gender identity, sexual orientation or any other characteristic protected by law.

Harvard University seeks an innovative, collaborative, and user-centered Collection Development Librarian to build and manage collections for one of the leading libraries in the world for the study of art, architecture, and visual culture from antiqu, Harvard University seeks an innovative, collaborative, and user-centered Collection Development Librarian to build and manage collections for one of the leading libraries in the world for the study of art, architecture, and visual culture from antiqu

Basic Qualifications

·         Master’s degree in library and/or information science or equivalent experience

·         A minimum of 5 years of experience in collection development/acquisitions experience required.

·         Extensive in-depth knowledge of the field of Art and Architectural History

·         Working knowledge of Western European languages.

·         Hands-on experience with library systems acquisitions, budgeting, and reporting applications.

·         Expert level experience with arts and humanities databases and other digital research tools.

·         Experience working with book publishing and the book trade.

·         Excellent verbal and written communication and interpersonal skills to work effectively with culturally diverse library users and colleagues.

 

Additional Qualifications

·         Advanced degree in Art History, or equivalent, preferred.

·         Evidence of a strong service orientation and demonstrated ability to work effectively with faculty, students, library users, and library colleagues.

·         Knowledge of scholarly communication trends and commitment to principles of open access.

·         Knowledge of intellectual property issues related to art library collections and services.

·         Strong technology skills and an enthusiasm for adopting new technologies and systems that expand access to collections and to facilitate their use in research and teaching.

·         Record of engagement with professional groups and activities and/or contributions to professional or scholarly literature.

 

PHYSICAL DEMANDS

·         The ability to lift, carry, and position books and other materials weighing up 15 lbs.

·         The ability to use desktop (keyboard, monitor, and mouse) and mobile computing tools, such as laptops and tablets.

 

WORK ENVIRONMENT

·         The work associated with this position is performed in an office, reading room, and library stack settings.

 

Apply Here: http://www.Click2apply.net/hsf6thw29ttkx7rm

Performing Arts Librarian at Reed College in Portland, OR

The Reed College Library seeks a performing arts librarian to collaborate closely with the faculty and students of the dance, music, and theatre academic programs, supporting teaching, creative work, and research activities in the performing arts. This role interacts frequently with Reed students, faculty, and staff as well as members of the public, manage collections including media and scores, and deliver course-related instruction and research assistance.  The performing arts librarian manages the Performing Arts Resource Center’s library services, hiring, training, and supervising library staff and students as well as coordinating with instructional technology staff who share the Performing Arts Resource Center space. This position participates with other librarians in providing general research assistance and library instruction to the Reed community.

Core responsibilities for this position include providing instruction, research assistance, and conducting outreach activities in support of the Performing Arts disciplines (Music, Theatre, and Dance); managing the library services provided by the Performing Arts Resource Center (PARC), including circulation of collections and equipment, as well as hiring, training, and managing library staff and student assistants at the PARC; providing leadership and expertise in the acquisition and management, and use of collections that support the performing arts. As a Reed College librarian, this position actively participates in professional activities of the library and the college by leading or serving on committees, providing training and educational opportunities for staff, and developing and maintaining connections with local, regional, and national professional communities.

The successful candidate will be knowledgeable about research and practice in the performing arts; have experience with the creation, organization, and use of audio and video media, scores, and other collections relating to the performing arts; and have the ability to collaborate with others and manage multiple priorities. Passion for student success, organization skills, attention to detail, and the ability to communicate well across diverse audiences are essential. They will also have a strong interest in contributing to the library’s research assistance, instruction, and outreach initiatives including promoting the use of library collections and services in the undergraduate curriculum, particularly in the performing arts.

How to Apply / Contact
For a complete job description, application instructions, and more information about the Reed College, please see: http://jobs.reed.edu/positions/performing-arts-librarian.html