Sargent Archives and Special Collections Archivist – Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA

Under general direction of the Croll Senior Curator of American Paintings, the Sargent Archives and Special Collections Archivist will oversee the archiving activities of the Sargent archives, including the housing, transcribing, and entering into the database of the items, and, when time, work on other Museum owned artist’s archives. This is a one-year, termed position from the start date.

Essential Functions:

• Prepare and organize archival records, such as document descriptions, to allow easy access to information in the Museum’s database.

• Working closely with our Conservation and Collections Management department, preserve records, documents, objects, or other formats as necessary, including housing, scanning, and transcribing materials.

• Assist with the organization and reorganization of storage as the collection grows.

• Research, catalogue, and write curatorial recommendations on new acquisitions for the Sargent archives and other artist’s archives as necessary.

• Establish and administer policy guidelines concerning public access and use of the Sargent archive. Will schedule and oversee visits of individuals and classes who wish to visit the collection, arranging for spaces and proper handling of materials. Will take out and put away work from the collection requested by visitors.

• Help maintain relationships with collectors of Sargent materials and respond to their needs regarding their collections; i.e. research, etc.

Qualifications/Requirements:

• Bachelor’s degree; 3 to 5 years of related archival experience

• Experience using a museum or collection database (TMS preferred)

• Experience with and knowledge of best practices in handling art and historical objects, including paper, photographs, and other ephemera

For consideration, please submit your cover letter and résumé to: resumes@mfa.org. You may also submit your materials via postal mail to: Human Resources Department, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115.

Collection Development Librarian, Fine Arts Library / Harvard University / Cambridge MA

Collection Development Librarian

Fine Arts Library, Harvard University
Req. 44840BR

SUMMARY
Harvard University seeks an innovative, collaborative, and user-centered Collection Development Librarian to build and manage collections for one of the leading libraries in the world for the study of art, architecture, and visual culture from antiquity to the present. Reporting to the Herman and Joan Suit Librarian of the Fine Arts Library, the incumbent will select library materials in all formats and work collaboratively with colleagues in the Fine Arts Library, across Harvard Library, and beyond to implement collection development strategies and operations. The incumbent will proactively partner with Harvard Library colleagues to develop creative solutions and efficient workflows for managing, acquiring, processing, preserving, and providing
access to library materials. He/she will actively engage with the visual arts community at Harvard to support innovative use of library collections in their teaching, research, and learning activities. To expand access to the Fine Arts Library’s unparalleled holdings to a wider global audience, the Collection Development Librarian will participate in local, national, and international digital initiatives and collaborative collection development partnerships.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Perform collection development processes in the Fine Arts Library for the Americas, Western Europe and portions of Eastern Europe (from antiquity to 1900), Africa, Australasia, Oceania, and other southern Pacific nations in traditional and emerging formats.
  • Work together with the Librarian and other Fine Arts Library selectors for Islamic, East Asian, Modern and Contemporary, Visual Resources, and Special Collections to build distinctive collections by acquiring and preserving antiquarian materials, primary sources, born digital collections, and electronic resources.
  • Ensure effective stewardship of the materials budget, including monitoring acquisition budgets and fund assignments for 8,000-10,000 titles annually.
  • Actively contribute to relevant Harvard Library collection development working groups, committees, councils, and innovative projects.
  • Maintain and update Fine Arts Library collection policy in consultation with FAL selectors and collection development colleagues across the Harvard Libraries.
  • Continuously evaluate print and digital publication trends in art history, architectural history, and the fine and applied arts and select rare and unique materials for digitization and wider dissemination to support digital scholarship.
  • Develop a wide and robust network of faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, museum curators and educators, fellows, and visiting scholars in order to exchange information related to FAL collections and current and emerging research areas and interests
  • Exchange information and best practices proactively with selectors across the Harvard Libraries for shared purchases, purchase recommendations, and de-duplication.
  • Contribute to collaborative collection development and digital projects with external partners, e.g., Ivies Art and Architecture Group.
  • Create and maintain in-depth and relevant content for multiple web presences for Fine Arts Library collections and collection-related events and news.
  • Assess collection strengths and correct weaknesses for curricular and research support and create routine and customized acquisitions and collections reports using COGNOS and other tools.
  • Establish and maintain effective and efficient relationships with approval, firm order, and antiquarian vendors and booksellers.
  • Work together with the Librarian and other Fine Arts Library selectors to negotiate and acknowledge gifts of materials and funds.
  • Work proactively and collaboratively with Information Technology Services staff to insure consistent and efficient vendor relations and processing routines.
  • Work proactively and collaboratively with Access Services collection management staff to plan for collection care, stacks space planning, and ongoing transfer of materials to off-site storage.
  • Work proactively and collaboratively with Preservation Services on disaster planning, collections care guidelines, and environmental concerns, as well as Digital Imaging staff on reformatting and digital preservation projects.
  • Engage in research services and activities, including contributing to regular hours of support for special collections researchers in collaboration with other librarians. Provide in-depth research consultations and resolve complex reference questions for library patrons.
BASIC QUALIFICATIONS

  • Master’s degree in library and/or information science or equivalent professional experience
  • At least 4 years of work experience with research collections in the visual arts
  • Demonstrated experience or research in the fields of Art and Architectural History
  • Working knowledge of at least one Western European languages

ADDITIONAL QUALIFICATIONS

  • Advanced degree in Art History, or equivalent, preferred.
  • Evidence of a strong service orientation and demonstrated ability to work effectively with faculty, students, library users, and library colleagues.
  • Expert level experience with arts and humanities databases and other digital research tools.
  • Experience working with the scholarly publishing market and the book trade.
  • Knowledge of trends in scholarly communication and digital scholarship and commitment to principles of open access.
  • Knowledge of intellectual property issues related to art library collections and services.
  • Strong technical skills and an enthusiasm for adopting new technologies and systems that expand access to collections and facilitate their use in research and teaching.
  • Record of engagement with professional groups and activities and/or contributions to professional or scholarly literature.
  • Excellent verbal and written communication and interpersonal skills to work effectively with culturally diverse library users and colleagues

SALARY GRADE 057

Position will remain posted until filled, however applications will be reviewed beginning March 30, 2018.

For more information or to apply to the position please visit:
https://hr.harvard.edu/search-jobs. Select Administrative / Staff Jobs, then enter 44840BR in the Search Jobs Field.

San Jose State University: University Library : Academic Services Collection Strategy Librarian, Art & Art History and Design Emphasis

University Library

Specialization: Collection Strategy Librarian, Art & Art History and Design Emphasis

Job Opening ID (JOID): 24466

Rank:  Senior Assistant Librarian (Tenuretrack)

The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library seeks an innovative and creative librarian to provide leadership in the area of collection strategy. Under the direction of the Director of Academic Services, the Collection Strategy Librarian will collaborate with faculty, library staff, and students to provide guidance in the development, management, delivery, assessment, and planning of the library’s digital and print collections. As a faculty member, the candidate participates in the library liaison program and engages in library and university governance and scholarship, which includes research, scholarly, and creative activities required for tenure and promotion. The Collection Strategy Librarian will serve as the liaison to the Departments of Art & Art History and Design.

Required Qualifications:

  • Applicants should demonstrate awareness of and sensitivity to educational goals of a multicultural population as might have been gained in cross-cultural study, training, teaching and other comparable experience
  • Minimum 2 years of experience in selecting library materials
  • Experience serving as a liaison to academic programs/departments
  • Master’s degree from an ALA accredited program or equivalent is required at time of appointment.
  • Knowledge of planning, designing, and implementing innovative practices or tools to improve collection development and maintenance.
  • Experience with collection analysis and assessment of print and electronic resources.
  • Familiarity with a collections budget and collection-related projects.
  • Excellent analytical, interpersonal, time management, organizational and problem-solving skills.

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Demonstrated ability to apply metrics and other evaluation criteria to support data-driven collection development decisions.
  • Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively on collection building and management in a rapidly changing information environment.
  • Experience or coursework with library resources relevant to the research, teaching, and learning of art, art history, or design.
  • Undergraduate or graduate degree or equivalent training/work experience in art, art history, or design.
  • Proficiency with an ILS system and analytics.
  • Proficiency with Excel or other spreadsheet/reporting platforms.

Responsibilities:

  • Candidate must address the needs of a student population of great diversity – in age, cultural background, ethnicity, primary language and academic preparation – through course materials, teaching strategies and advisement
  • Under the direction of the Director of Academic Services, leads collection development activities including assessment, selection, and deselection of print, non-print, electronic resources, and gifts in all subject areas.
  • As part of the Academic Services team, develops the collection management, preservation, and deselection strategy.
  • Coordinates collection development and selection activities of liaison librarians.
  • Work with relevant stakeholders in developing collection development policies, evaluating print and electronic material purchases, and providing disciplinary collection assessment and statistical analysis and reports.
  • Establishes and maintains a strong collaborative relationship with all library units that build and maintain digital and physical collections.
  • Represents and participates in cooperative collection development programs with other libraries and library consortia.
  • Develops and maintains an awareness of the trends and issues affecting collection management and development.
  • Builds a record of progressive scholarly and professional achievement to fulfill the University requirement of retention, tenure and promotion.
  • Participates in the library liaison program, providing services to the departments of Art & Art History and Design.

Salary Range: Commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Starting Date: Summer 2018.

Eligibility: Employment is contingent upon proof of eligibility to work in the United States.

Please include Job Opening ID (JOID) on all correspondence.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

Application Procedures: For full consideration, submit: (1) a letter of interest; (2) curriculum vitae; (3) statement of teaching interests/philosophy; (4) research plan; and (5) names of three professional references with contact information by April 6, 2018 via Interfolio link. This position will remain open until filled.

Important: This item will be required of finalists at the time of on-campus visit: (1) Original, sealed, graduate school transcripts. Mailing address: SJSU, King Library; Attention: Evelia Sanchez; One Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95192-0028.

Tracy Elliott, Dean, University Library, invites you to contact us with your questions at (408) 808-2080 or via email at library-jobs@sjsu.eduPlease visit our websites at http://www.sjsu.edu and library.sjsu.eduFor information on faculty retention, tenure and promotion, see the SJSU Academic Senate policies S15-7 & S15-8 at http://www.sjsu.edu/senate/policies/pol_chron/

The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library at San José State University is recognized as an innovative shared facility combining a large academic library (with a collection of over one million items) and a major downtown public library. This facility uses a merged service model to support the lifelong learning needs of academic and public library users. The University Library’s strategic plan is to build a digital library which will “aggressively increase access, creation, and use of digital collections,” and “will creatively utilize innovative technologies to provide the University and the broader community with a 21st century library environment, both physical and digital.”

San José State University is California’s oldest public institution of higher learning. The campus is located on the southern end of San Francisco Bay in downtown San José (Pop. 1,000,000), hub of the world-famous Silicon Valley high-technology research and development center. Many of California’s most popular national, recreational, and cultural attractions are nearby. A member of the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system, San José State University enrolls approximately 35,000 students, a significant percentage of whom are members of ethno-cultural minority groups. The Library – and the University of which it is a part – is committed to increasing the diversity of its faculty so our community can benefit from multiple perspectives.

Apply here.

Library Fellowship – Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA

The Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library is pleased to announce the creation of a Library Fellowship for Collections Management. This fellowship is intended for a recent library school graduate interested in pursuing a career in art librarianship with a focus on technical services. Working closely with the Collections Management Librarian, the recipient will gain valuable hands on experience working with materials in all formats from the main research collection, special collections, digital collections, and archives. Training will including collection assessment and preservation, metadata creation and enhancement, library systems management, digitization, and capture of born digital materials. Special projects will be designed in response to the recipient’s individual interests and skills. In addition to work within the library, the recipient will be expected to participate in ARLIS on a local and national level and will be encouraged to share their experiences through professional writing, poster sessions, and/or presentations.

This is a one-year project position with the possibility of renewal for a second year and an anticipated start date of July 2, 2018. The position is full time with an annual salary of $32,000, benefits, and an additional stipend for professional development and to defray costs associated with attending the ARLIS/NA annual conference.

QUALIFICATIONS

Required:
Master’s degree from an ALA-accredited program for library and information science
Excellent oral and written communication skills.

Preferred:
Background in the History of Art or a related field.
Reading knowledge of at least one foreign language.
Prior library experience, ideally in technical services.

Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Individuals interested in applying should submit a cover letter, resume, and the names of three references via email to humanresources@clarkart.edu

 

ABOUT THE CLARK
The Clark is one of only a handful of institutions globally with a dual mission as an art museum and a distinguished center for research and higher education, dedicated to advancing and extending the public understanding of art. The Clark is located in Williamstown, a community within the Berkshires of western Massachusetts, a region known for its scenic beauty and the rich diversity of its cultural institutions. Williamstown is one hour from Albany, New York and three hours from Boston and New York City.

 

ABOUT THE LIBRARY
Established in 1962, the Clark Library has become one of the major art reference and research libraries in the country. Focusing on post-medieval European and American art, the collection is outstanding in the fields of Italian and Northern Renaissance, Baroque, nineteenth-century French art, and the history of photography. Recent grants have greatly increased holdings in contemporary and non-Western art and the library is home to exceptional rare and artists’ book collections.

Reference/Cataloging Librarian – Sotheby’s Institute of Art, New York, NY

About Sotheby’s Institute of Art

Founded in 1969 by Sotheby’s auction house, the Sotheby’s Institute of Art (SIA) is the first and foremost graduate school for the study of art and its markets. Located in one of the most vibrant art cities of the world, Sotheby’s Institute of Art-New York (SIA-NY) has been an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) since 1989 and holds degree-granting authority from the Regents of the State of New York. With campuses in New York, London, and Los Angeles, the Institute continues to offer innovative and progressive academic and professional training to prepare students for exciting careers in the art market. Today, the Institute’s more than 6,000 alumni hold leadership positions worldwide in auction houses, galleries, art fairs, museums, and art organizations.

SIA-NY is seeking a Reference/Cataloging Librarian to provide reference, cataloging, instruction and access services for Sotheby’s Institute of Art – New York (SIA-NY). Reporting to the Head Librarian, the Reference/Cataloging Librarian assists in building and cataloging print-based and online collections, providing on-site library services and library research education in support of Sotheby’s Institute of Art New York’s academic program. Adheres to the highest service standards and administers the library’s resources to provide excellent support to students, faculty and staff. Shares responsibility with the SIA Libraries team for long-range strategic planning for the library, fostering a creative, collaborative and team-oriented work-environment. Contributes expertise to improve coordination of service procedures and understanding of reader expectations.

Job Responsibilities include the following but the individual will also be expected to perform all the duties necessary which are customarily performed by a person holding this position. Other duties may be assigned.

·         Plans, monitors and evaluates reference and cataloging services of the SIA-NY library including: information and instruction services, cataloging of collection materials, maintenance of the integrated library system, electronic and print course reserves, the SIA-NY library website and inter-library loan.

·         Assists with maintenance and continued development of the library website by facilitating design and content planning.

·         Assists in managing licenses and access for electronic resources.

·         Works closely in conjunction with academic staff, administrative staff and students to ensure the continuing relevance of materials and services provided.

·         Contributes to the development of local- and system-wide policies and procedures and continues to be professionally active both at SIA-NY and in library, scholarly and/or academic organizations.

·         May be assigned weekend and/or evening hours during the Fall and Spring terms.

Knowledge and Abilities

·         Ability to provide research and reference services

·         Knowledge of integrated library systems, library applications and other information technologies

·         Knowledge of the subject areas of the library collections

·         Proven computer skills and knowledge, including proficiency using applications such as MS Word, MS Excel, plus a high level of comfort working with technology and troubleshooting initiative

·         Strong interpersonal and communication skills required for working in a small team and for working within the broader context of the Institute

·         Strong sense of initiative

·         Strong organizational skills and attention to detail

·         A desire to work with the public is essential

·         Ability to be present in the office

·         Ability to pass a background check

Qualifications

·         an ALA accredited MLS or its international equivalent

·         a degree or proven interest in art history

·         minimum of 2 years experience as an information professional

·         work experience must include not less than one year in a fast paced, customer-oriented service work environment

·         Strong professional English language skills, both written and spoken

·         Foreign language skills desirable, but not required.

·         Authorization to work in the United States is required

Sotheby’s Institute of Art offers a competitive salary that is based on education and experience.

To Apply:

·         Email your resume and a cover letter to: opportunities@sothebysinstitute.com

·         In the subject line of your email enter: “Reference/Cataloging Librarian”

·         Only qualified candidates should apply

Thinking about “Folk Art”

This post was sparked by an essay that caught my eye while reading Radical cataloging: Essays at the front, edited by K. R. Roberto (I highly recommend it if cataloging, description, and/or metadata is your thing). The article that intrigued me was a chapter by Joan M. Benedetti, a re-edit of an article that originally appeared in a 2000 issue of Art Documentation, entitled “Words, words, words: Folk art terminology- Why it (still) matters.” Benedetti talks about the mess of issues surrounding terminology like folk art and outsider art. It reminded me of the work of Sanford Berman and Hope Olson. Both Berman and Olson’s seminal works, Prejudices and antipathies: A tract on the LC subject heads concerning people and The power to name: Representation in library catalogs, discuss the biases, and with this power, in the language of the Library of Congress controlled vocabularies. While some time has passed since these works were initially published, 1971 and 1996, librarians are still challenging problems in the language of controlled vocabularies (see Emily Drabinski’s 2013 article “Queering the catalog: Queer theory and the politics of correction”).

Matthew Arient’s Angel by Howard Finster, 1987

 

Before digging into Benedetti’s essay and issues surrounding folk art terminology, I want to present brief definitions of terms that are helpful to think of in the context of this discussion. Definitions have been taken from The Getty Thesaurus for Art and Architecture.

Folk art: Art and crafts that are produced in culturally cohesive communities or contexts, and guided by traditional rules or procedures. It includes paintings, ceramics, textiles, sculpture, and other art forms. It is generally distinct from “naive art,” which is created by those without formal training, but not necessarily within a cohesive cultural community. It is also distinct from “outsider art,” which usually refers specifically to art created or collected according to a philosophy of avoidance of traditional training.

Outsider art: Refers to art created or collected according to a philosophy of avoidance of the conventional fine art tradition. The concept generally refers to art that fits the ideal described by Jean Dubuffet, who posited that art should be inventive, non-conformist, unprocessed, spontaneous, insulated from all social and cultural influences, “brut,” created without thought of financial gain or public recognition, and based upon autonomous inspiration, in direct contrast to the stereotypes of the traditional or official artistic culture. Dubuffet sought such art in the work of psychiatric patients and other insulated individuals. It is generally distinct from “naive art,” which is created by those without formal training, but not necessarily in accordance with the principles described above. It is also typically distinct from “folk art,” which is made according to the rules and traditions of a particular culture.

Naive art: Refers to art created by non-professional artists or artisans who have not had formal training and are often self-taught. It typically displays the artist’s poor grasp of anatomy and lacks mastery of conventional perspective and other hallmarks of trained artists. It includes painting, sculpture, embroidery, quilts, toys, ships’ figureheads, decoys, painted targets, and other objects, and often refers to such objects created specifically in 19th- and 20th-century Europe and North America. It is generally distinguished from “outsider art,” which includes the more extravagant psychotic drawings and other art created or collected according to a philosophy of the avoidance of, rather than simply a lack of, traditional training. It is also usually distinct from “folk art,” which is created according to specific cultural traditions.

Fine art: Genre including physical objects that are that are meant to be perceived primarily through the sense of sight, are of high quality, requiring refined skill in creation, and typically using the media of painting, drawing, or sculpture. It may also refer to architecture and design. Although there is overlap, fine art is generally distinguished from other art forms based on the media, extent of skill, and the level of formal training required. It is distinct from “decorative art” in that the fine arts are art in which the aesthetic or intellectual expression is more prominent than the utilitarian purpose. It is distinct from “crafts,” which are handiworks of media such as ceramics, glass, needlework, or any medium other than painting, drawing, sculpture, or architecture. It is also distinct from “commercial art,” which is created to serve commerce such as in advertisements or illustration.

The Getty Thesaurus of Art and Architecture gives distinct definitions for folk, outsider, and naive art, clearly delineating them as not synonyms to one another. However, these words are still often used interchangeably. This is also not an exhaustive list of terms that are used to describe art of this similar, yet variant nature, but just three I chose to highlight.

Man with a Plow by Bill Traylor, 1939-1942

Folk art, outsider art, and naive art are terms used by individuals in a position of privilege within the institution of fine art to describe the work created by individuals outside of this institution. A dichotomy between those with the power to name and those without, between those who point out this “other” and those who are this “other,” is always problematic. General acceptance of what constitutes fine art is rooted in Western, Eurocentric practice and thought. The land of outsider art, as posited by museum professional Kenneth L. Ames, is largely populated by “minority, marginalized, and unempowered people. (Ames, 1994, p. 255).

Navajo Rug, 1890-1900

Benedetti discusses problems with the overuse of “folk” as a designator for such a wide variety of works. She draws a distinction between items that are created by “culturally cohesive communities” with utilitarian value, such as a Navajo rug, and items created from a “personal consciousness,” which are often idiosyncratic and often “functioning in opposition to any community context,” such as the works of artist Howard Finster (Benedetti, 1987, p. 4). Oftentimes though, both of these types of works would fall under the same category of “folk art.”

The concepts behind folk art terminology is not so simple and further evaluation for nuances, biases, and clarification would be beneficial. Both Benedetti and Ames present issues with the terminology that garners future consideration, thought, and study by scholars, librarians, and anyone with an interest in the power of language.

References

Ames, K.L. (1994). Outside outsider art. In M. D. Hall & E. W. Metcalf, Jr. (Eds.) The Artist outsider: creativity and boundaries of culture (p. 253-271). Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press.

Benedetti, J.M. (2000). Words, words, words: Folk art terminology- Why it (still) matters. Art Documentation, 19(1), 14-21.

Benedetti, J. M. (2003). Folk art terminology revisited: Why it (still) matters. In K. R. Robert (Ed.), Radical cataloging: Essays at the front (p. 112-125). Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company.

NDSR Art Residency Call for Applications

National Digital Stewardship Residency Art (NDSR Art) is now accepting applications for its second and final cohort. Four candidates will be selected to work on projects related digital stewardship of new media and arts information. Each resident will be assigned to one of the four available projects and corresponding host institutions. The 2018-19 hosts are the Art Institute of Chicago, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum of Art, Maryland Institute College of Art, and Small Data Industries. See the Project Description page for qualification requirements and information about each of the four projects.

Applicants should specify their top two institutional choices in their application form. Application review will begin immediately and will continue until the positions are filled.

The deadline for applications is March 16, 2018. Selected residents will be announced in May.

This NDSR Art residency runs for 12 months, from July 16, 2018 to July 12, 2019, starting with a week-long training session in Philadelphia. Residents will work full-time, on-site in fully funded positions at their host institutions with opportunities for travel and professional development throughout.

This program aims to bridge the gap between existing, welldeveloped classroom education and the need for more direct professional experience in the field. The mission of the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) is to build a dedicated community of professionals who will advance our nation’s capabilities in managing, preserving, and making accessible the digital record of human achievement. We encourage students interested in digital stewardship and cultural heritage to apply.

Who May Apply

Anyone who has received or will be receiving a master’s degree (or higher) between Spring 2016 and Summer 2018 in a field related to digital stewardship will be eligible to apply for the 2018 resident class. If you are receiving your degree after the application deadline, and are selected as a NDSR Art resident, you will need to sign an agreement confirming you will receive your degree prior to the residency start in July 2018 or will relinquish your place in the program.

 Applicants should be prepared and willing to move to the geographic location of their host institution for a twelve-month period beginning in July 2018.

 Applicants must be eligible to work in the United States; NDSR Art will not be able to sponsor employment visas

For detailed information about the residency and application instructions, please see the NDSR Art website: http://ndsr-pma.arlisna.org/

NDSR Art is a partnership of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and ARLIS/NA, made possible with generous funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Why You Should Attend the Summer Educational Institute (SEI) for Visual Resources and Image Management

Are you a student or new professional interested in art librarianship, visual resources, or digital humanities? If so, you should consider attending the Summer Educational Institute (SEI) for Visual Resources and Image Management in Albuquerque, NM on June 5-8, 2018. This annual workshop, a joint project of the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) and the Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF), provides information professionals with the latest technologies and tools to be successful in the rapidly changing field of visual resources. This year the curriculum includes intellectual property rights, digitization standards and process monitoring, metadata, digital preservation, digital curation, and digital humanities. The skills you gain from attending a workshop like SEI will supplement your library school coursework and can help you land a job in this field.

Here’s what two former attendees have to say about their experience:

“SEI was an invaluable experience for me, particularly as a newcomer to the Visual/Digital Resources field. I attended SEI in 2017, having just recently been hired as the Visual Resources Librarian at the University of New Hampshire. The curriculum was just what I needed. In my day-to-day work, I now find myself constantly referring back to things I learned at SEI, from best practices in digitization, to copyright issues, to implementing and managing Digital Humanities projects. In addition to the practical knowledge I gained at SEI, I also met an amazing group of colleagues from across the country. It was comforting to know that others in my position are dealing with the same challenges I face, especially as the Visual Resources and Digital Resources fields continue to evolve and change at such a rapid pace. I was also deeply impressed by everyone’s enthusiasm and commitment to their profession, from the instructors and participants, to the organizers. I recommend SEI to anyone wishing to enhance their skills and connect with dedicated colleagues. My belief in SEI’s core mission and values is such, that I volunteered to take on the role of webmaster for SEI 2018. Take a look at the website for detailed information on the curriculum, instructors, and our new venue at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. And feel free to contact me (otto.luna@unh.edu) should you have any questions about attending SEI.”

Otto Luna, University of New Hampshire

“Many of my goals and expectations were met or exceeded. The professionals brought in to instruct us were great at imparting their expertise and experience to us through presentations, activities and Q&A. While I was not able to connect with everyone at SEI, there was a community atmosphere developed between attendees, organizers and instructors. It was especially helpful for me, as someone new to the VR sector of librarianship. The most surprising aspect of SEI, for me, was the reassurance that I felt building during my time there. I went in with imposter syndrome, feeling like I was inexperienced and that was the cause of how overwhelmed I felt. I learned a lot about the challenges of my specific position, such as its broad scope. I realized that the breadth of the knowledge that I needed to do my job was a benefit and a challenge. I found that I should be more confident, because I know more have a better understanding of my work than I give myself credit for. While there is no replacement for practical experience, there is a lot to be said for having confidence in the work you do and in decisions you make. SEI provided me with an invaluable experience and one that I will recall often when I am presented with challenges throughout my career. Additionally, because of connections that I made at SEI, I was offered the opportunity to become the Publicity Specialist with the SEI Implementation team.”

Chelsea Stone, Sacred Heart University

Library & Archives Intern (paid) at Toledo Museum of Art

Toledo, OH
POSITION: LIBRARY & ARCHIVES INTERN (Paid)
AVAILABILITY: SUMMER 2018

WHO WE ARE: Since our founding in 1901, the Toledo Museum of Art has earned a global reputation for the quality of our collection, our innovative and extensive education programs, and our architecturally significant campus. More than 30,000 works of art represent American and European painting, the history of art in glass, ancient Greek, Roman, and Egyptian works, Asian and African art, medieval art, sculpture, decorative arts, graphic arts, and modern and contemporary art.

To accommodate the ever growing collection and demand for art education, the Museum campus has grown exponentially since its founding. From its humble first exhibition space in two rented rooms, the Museum has grown to cover approximately 36 acres with six buildings.

Thanks to the benevolence of its founders, as well as the continued support of its members, the Toledo Museum of Art remains a privately-endowed, non-profit institution and opens its collection to the public—free of charge—six days a week, 309 days a year. We are closed on Mondays and major holidays.

AREAS OF INTERESTS: Library & Information Studies, Archives

SUMMARY: This internship provides students with direct experience processing museum archival material. The internship will focus on our Facilities Plans inventory project. The student will assist with processing and inventorying of blueprints and other physical plans in this archival collection. Responsibilities will include arranging records, data entry and assisting with the creation of catalog records and a finding aid for the collection. Other responsibilities may include assisting with other archival request or projects at they may arise or the intern may have interest in.

RELATIONSHIPS: Mentorship from the Head Librarian and other library and archives staff; participation in library & archives staff meetings.

EDUCATION, EXPERIENCE & COMPETENCIES: Active college enrollment status at the graduate level preferred; library and information science, archives, or related concentration/major; coursework or experience in archival processing or description preferred; comfort working independently; computer savvy and proficient in Microsoft Office and related software; extreme attention to detail; innovative and self-motivated.

WORK ENVIRONMENT: Standard office work environment with related phone, computer and printer noise; position requires ability to lift boxes and retrieve material as needed and the ability to leverage technology including computer, printer and phone systems; the person in this position may be required to communicate with public and staff who have inquiries and must be able to exchange accurate information in these situations.

The Toledo Museum of Art provides equal opportunity for employment and promotion to all qualified employees and applicants. No person shall be discriminated against in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, age, national origin, marital status, disability, sexual orientation, veteran status or any other status or condition protected by applicable federal or state statutes. The Museum is committed to maintaining an environment in which all employees are treated equitably and given the opportunity to achieve their full potential in the workplace.

Apply through link: http://www.toledomuseum.org/about/jobs-volunteer/employment/

Paid Internship Opportunity – Metadata Specialist Intern, Crutchfield, Charlottesville VA

Are you looking for more than just a summer job? Crutchfield’s summer experience is structured, but far from stuffy. This paid internship program will help you develop new skills, make connections, and strengthen your resume by learning directly from company leaders. Our interns work on real projects that matter and we’ll count on your skills and experience to solve problems in a relaxed and fun environment.

Help us find the right photos faster. You’ll work with our photography team, print and web designers, and digital asset manager to help us organize our photo storage, and optimize our naming and metadata to get better search results.

This position is 40 hours/week and pays $15/hour.  Duties include, but are not limited to:

  • Interviewing stakeholders
  • Planning and implementing a new file structure for digital assets
  • Reviewing existing assets and recommending a list of keywords to optimize searches using image librarian program
  • Recommending and implementing improvements to the process of tagging new/existing image
  • Working with IT to implement improvements to the image librarian program
  • Developing and managing a process to tag images and file assets from in-house photo studio

Apply: https://workforcenow.adp.com/jobs/apply/posting.html?client=crutchfiel&jobId=78293&source=IN