Call for Proposals: ArLiSNAP and VREPS November 2018 Virtual Conference

ArLiSNAP and VREPS welcome proposals from students and new professionals with an interest in art librarianship or visual resources management to present their work at our 2018 Virtual Conference:

New Media Challenges and Solutions for Art Information Professionals  

New media art, objects, and scholarly projects in the digital realm are challenging our traditional definitions and methodologies for collection, preservation, and research as information professionals. As the scope for new media continues to expand, how are we defining, describing, and cataloging new media objects? How are we preparing for and anticipating storage and conservation needs? How do we respect artist intent and support scholarly research around these born-digital objects?

We invite proposals that share research and projects featuring new media in art librarianship and visual resources management for our annual virtual conference, an opportunity for emerging professionals to present in a supportive and engaging space while connecting with other students and early career librarians across North America.

The webinar will take place on Saturday, November 10th at 1PM CST. Submit your proposal via our Google Form to apply.

Proposals are due by Friday, September 14th. You must also be available to participate in a short practice session with the webinar software in the evening on Thursday, October 4. If you have any questions, please email the ArLiSNAP Conference Planning Liaison, Michelle Wilson at michelle.elizabeth.wilson@gmail.com.

Please welcome our new Feature Post Writer: Courtney Hunt!

Hello! I’m so happy to volunteer for ArLiSNAP and write for the blog as a Feature Post Writer. I graduated in 2017 from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville with my M.S.I.S. and also hold an M.A. in the History of Art and Architecture from Hunter College/CUNY.

I currently work as Collection Development & Assessment Librarian at the College of Charleston Libraries in Charleston, SC. I’m from Charleston, and I just moved back for this position (and to be closer to family), so I’m taking my time to get to know the campus and reacquaint myself with all that Charleston has to offer. Prior to this position, I worked as an instruction librarian at a community college in Virginia, where I also taught art history as an adjunct instructor.

My research interests are wide, but center around intersectional feminism and art making, specifically looking at women artists from the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Europe. My library research interests include the intersection of critical librarianship and collection development, visual resources, and the ways in which fine arts collections are used.

In my spare time I love to travel and experience art/music/food in new places with my partner and our 14 month old son.
I am very excited to be here and to contribute to ArLiSNAP, which is full of inspiration and information for all of us new professionals in the field! Thanks for having me.

Call for Reviewers: October Issue of ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews

ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews Needs You!

ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews Co-editors are seeking volunteers to author reviews for the October 2018 issue. To volunteer, choose a resource from the list below and complete our Reviewer Interest form (https://goo.gl/forms/mpOOJZaCBb6wIXpA2) by Tuesday, July 31.

Initial draft submissions are due Monday, September 3.

Contributing to ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews is a great opportunity to get involved with the Society, learn about interesting new resources, and help shape the publication. Please feel free to read the complete review guidelines and direct comments and questions about the reviews to arlisna.mtr@gmail.com.

 

Submitted by ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews Co-editors:

Melanie Emerson

Gabriella Karl-Johnson

Alexandra Provo

 

Resources for Review: We seek reviewers for the following resources.

**The snippets below are taken from each resource’s web page and are not necessarily the opinions of the M&T Reviews Co-Editors

 

Hugh Edwards

http://media.artic.edu/edwards/

Hugh Edwards was one of the most influential, yet least known, photography curators in America. During his time at the Art Institute, he worked with remarkable enthusiasm and prescience to build the museum’s photography collection and expand its exhibition program, acquiring some three thousand works and organizing seventy-five shows. In a field that was still young, Edwards helped to shape institutional practices and the public’s understanding of photography in Chicago as well as across the country.

 

Picturing Places

https://www.bl.uk/picturing-places

A new free online resource which explores the Library’s extensive holdings of landscape imagery. The British Library’s huge collection of historic prints and drawings is a treasure trove waiting to be discovered. Picturing Places showcases works of art by well-known artists such as Thomas Gainsborough and J.M.W. Turner alongside images by a multitude of lesser-known figures. Only a few have ever been seen or published before.

 

Connect Vermeer

http://connectvermeer.org/

For many art lovers and museum visitors, Johannes Vermeer stands out as the mysterious genius of Dutch seventeenth-century genre painting. However, as this website reveals, he was not working in isolation. …Through a series of interactive visualisations, this website allows users to discover the network of connections between Vermeer and his sixteen contemporaries. Users can discover the strength and likelihood of relationships between the seventeen artists, the impact of an individual artist’s paintings on the work of his contemporaries, as well as how artists adopted, adapted and disguised elements, from their peers’ work, in their own paintings.

 

Parker Library on the Web

https://parker.stanford.edu/parker

The Parker Library’s holdings of Old English texts account for a substantial proportion of all extant manuscripts in Anglo-Saxon, including the earliest copy of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (c. 890), unique copies of Old English poems and other texts, and King Alfred’s translation of Gregory the Great’s Pastoral Care. The Parker Library also contains key Anglo-Norman and Middle English texts ranging from the Ancrene Wisse and the Brut Chronicle to one of the finest copies of Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde. Other subjects represented in the collection are theology, music, medieval travelogues and maps, apocalypses, bestiaries, royal ceremonies, historical chronicles and Bibles. The Parker Library holds a magnificent collection of English illuminated manuscripts, such as the Bury and Dover Bibles (c. 1135 and c. 1150) and the Chronica maiora by Matthew Paris (c. 1230-50). Scholars in a variety of disciplines – including historians of art, music, science, literature, politics and religion – find invaluable resources in the Library’s collection.

 

Clyfford Still: The Works on Paper

http://pubs.clyffordstillmuseum.org/worksonpaper/

Clyfford Still (1904–1980) may have explored the potential of drawing more than any other artist of his time. The sheer volume (more than 2,300) and variety of Still’s works on paper reveal the centrality of drawing within his lifelong creative process. Over six decades, Still explored (and showed considerable mastery of) the entire range of drawing media—graphite, charcoal, pastel, crayon, pen and ink, oil paint, gouache, and tempera on paper—as well as the printmaking techniques of lithography, etching, woodcut, and silkscreen. Examined together, these works on paper tell the story of an artist who never lost an experimental and curious approach to his art, even as his mature work became quintessentially deliberate and monumental.

 

Vincent van Gogh: The Letters

http://vangoghletters.org/vg/letters.html

All the surviving letters written and received by Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) are contained in this edition of his correspondence. Excepting only the digital form in which they are now being published, this is the continuation of a long tradition.

 

Faces of Frida

https://artsandculture.google.com/project/frida-kahlo

Faces of Frida is a collaboration between the tech giant and a worldwide network of experts and 33 partner museums in seven countries. Accessible via the Google Arts & Culture app and website, Faces of Frida is the largest collection of artworks and objects related to Kahlo ever compiled.

 

Palmyra

http://www.getty.edu/palmyra

In this 21st century, war in Syria has irrevocably changed the ancient caravan city of Palmyra, famed as a meeting place of civilizations since its apogee in the mid-2nd to 3rd century CE. The Romans and Parthians knew Palmyra as a wealthy oasis metropolis, a center of culture and trade on the edge of their empires. Stretching some three kilometers across the Tadmurean desert, the ruins of Palmyra, like all ruins, stand as bearers of meaning marking their place in history. For centuries, traveling artists and explorers have documented the site in former states of preservation. Created as a tribute to Palmyra, this online exhibition captures the site as it was photographed for the first time by Louis Vignes in 1864 and illustrated in the 18th century by the architect Louis-François Cassas. Their works contribute to Palmyra’s legacy, one that goes far beyond the stones of its once great buildings.

Internship opportunity: Paid Midwest Dance & Theatre Collections Intern, Newberry Library

Department: Maps and Modern Manuscripts

Summary: This 15 week internship is funded by a private donor. Working in the Department of Maps and Modern Manuscripts under the supervision of Newberry archivists, the Midwest Dance and Theater Collections Intern will participate in preserving, arranging, re-housing, and describing Chicago dance and theater archives and manuscript collections. This position is ideal for an individual intending to work with primary sources as part of an academic career, or exploring the possibilities of archival work.

Responsibilities:

Under the supervision of Newberry archivists, the intern will participate in the following archival activities:

  • Arrange and re-house materials in Chicago dance and theater collections according to archival practice.
  • Apply appropriate preservation treatments to collection materials. Treatments include, but are not limited to, surface cleaning, flattening, removal of fasteners, and photocopying.
  • Prepare detailed descriptive inventories for collections in a format compatible with the archival professional standard, Encoded Archival Description (EAD).
  • Participate in identifying analog audio-visual formats in the collections, preparing them for digitization, and creating metadata.

Qualifications:

  • Graduate student in a master’s program in library and information sciences and/or public history with coursework in archival processing required;
  • Effective oral and written communication skills;
  • Experience working with primary sources;
  • Ability to work independently and in group settings;
  • Ability to shelve and lift archival boxes;
  • Familiarity with computer applications;
  • Academic focus on dance and theater history of Chicago and the Midwest preferred.

Schedule: 150 hours (typically 10 hours/per week for 15 weeks).

Dates: Fall semester, with start date in mid-September.

This is a paid internship.

 

See original job posting here: https://www.newberry.org/internships#mdi

Job posting: Learning Commons Coordinator, Maine College of Art, Portland, ME

Maine College of Art (MECA) seeks a Learning Commons Coordinator. This is a full-time position with duties commencing on or about September 1, 2018.

POSITION SUMMARY

The Learning Commons Coordinator at Maine College of Art is a newly designed position tasked with developing and implementing the vision for a learning commons that will bring together the library and tutorial services. In an effort to bridge the College’s academic services and supports, the Learning Commons Coordinator will oversee MECA’s Learning Studio, manage tutoring and research support, oversee the day-to-day maintenance of the library collection, and will teach two courses each year. As an integral component of the research and support services provided by the College, the position will interface closely with faculty, students, staff, and the larger MECA community to help meet the academic goals and mission of the library as well as the institution at large.

The Learning Commons Coordinator’s duties include the hiring, supervising, and training of tutors and student workers, student tutoring, research support as needed, collection maintenance, and administrative tasks. The Learning Commons Coordinator collaborates with the Dean’s Office and reports to the START team on occasion to assist with early intervention of students experiencing academic challenges. As a faculty position, the Learning Commons Coordinator will also teach two courses each year based on educational background and subject specialties.

The position reports to the Library Director.

RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Provides research support to students, faculty, and staff as needed
  • Facilitates workshops for students covering library resources, research, and study skills
  • Participates actively in the planning and decision-making of both tutorial services and the library
  • Works to actively carry out the values of the College’s Diversity Statement and Compact both within the library and at the College at large
  • Supervises, hires, trains, and evaluates tutors and library student workers
  • Tutors students on occasion
  • Oversees the maintenance of the library’s physical collections
  • Maintains circulation and other statistics to document library and tutoring activities
  • Manages office and library supplies, including inventories and ordering
  • Will teach two courses per year
  • Works with the Library Director on special projects as required
  • Serves on MECA committees as appropriate

QUALIFICATIONS

  • Master’s degree in Library Science, Information Science, Education, Rhetoric / Composition, English, Art History, Art Theory, or a related field from an accredited institution
  • At least two years of related work experience
  • Knowledge of library circulation, acquisitions, and cataloging procedures
  • Familiarity with the learning commons model and/or tutoring services in higher education
  • Demonstrated commitment to diversity, inclusion, and equity
  • Comprehensive understanding of how libraries and higher education can serve the needs of users from diverse backgrounds
  • Strong background in art and design curriculum
  • Strong customer service orientation and demonstrated management skills, such as interpersonal skills, aptitude for one-on-one and classroom teaching, and experience working with diverse learning styles
  • Evidence of ability to maintain effective and collegial working relations with staff, students, faculty, and administration
  • Highly adaptable and responds well to change
  • Demonstrated knowledge of best practices and trends in emerging technologies
  • Ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing, and the ability to facilitate communication with the library and with key constituencies

Preferred Qualifications

  • Demonstrated creativity and innovation in library services in higher education
  • Demonstrated commitment to student success/achievement
  • Evidence of continued professional development
  • BA/BFA in art or art-related field

COMPENSATION + BENEFITS

Salary range $44,000 — $48,000 depending on experience; health, dental, vacation, sick and retirement benefits.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

Applications will be reviewed beginning immediately and will be accepted until a hire is made, with a targeted start date of September 1, 2018. Application materials must be sent digitally in a single PDF, not to exceed a 25MB file size. Please email the document to employment@meca.edu. Place “Learning Commons Coordinator [LastName FirstName]” in the subject line. The PDF must include (1) an application letter which describes how the candidate’s experience, accomplishments and qualifications intersect with the listed position description; (2) a curriculum vitae; (3) a diversity statement; (4) a teaching philosophy; (5) relevant scholarly publications (if available); (6) a list of five references with contact information, one of which should be a student. Finalists must submit all college transcripts and agree to a background check.

Maine College of Art recognizes that diversity is integral to the academic experience and strives to foster an inclusive culture defined by respect, equity and social responsibility. Successful candidates will have demonstrated experience in working with diverse populations, and supporting an inclusive and equitable community. Maine College of Art does not discriminate on the basis of gender, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, disability, genetic information, HIV status, race, age, religion, national or ethnic origin, or military/veteran’s status in its educational programs, admissions policies, employment policies, financial aid, or other College administered programs. Candidates from historically underrepresented backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

INSTITUTION

Maine College of Art is an independent college of art and design located in the center of the thriving arts district of Portland, Maine. Established in 1882, the College currently enrolls approximately 500 students, the majority of whom are in the undergraduate program. About 1,200 students take classes through MECA’s Continuing Studies Program annually. MECA’s Joanne Waxman Library is an important resource of art­ and design ­oriented books and periodicals for the region. The Institute of Contemporary Art at MECA is a vibrant site for the exhibition of contemporary art.

MECA is characterized by its intimate learning community, its interdisciplinary nature and the breadth of its programs. It confers the degrees of Bachelor of Fine Arts in eleven majors, Master of Fine Arts in Studio Art, Master of Arts in Teaching, and the Salt Graduate Certificate in Documentary Studies. Our goal at MECA is to teach each student how to transform aspirations and values into a creative practice that serves as the foundation for a lifelong pursuit of personal and professional goals.

Maine College of Art is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). The College’s accreditation status with both agencies was renewed in 2016.

Job posting: Library Associate, Circulation and Technical Services, Thomas J. Watson Library at the Metropolitan Museum of Art- NYC, NY

The Thomas J. Watson Library in The Metropolitan Museum of Art is pleased to announce an opening for the position of Library Associate, Circulation and Technical Services. This full-time position is a special opportunity to contribute to the success of an innovative and productive art library at a world-class museum while learning and applying new skills.

The Library Associate is a key member of both the technical services and circulation departments, responsible for ensuring accurate access and inventory control of the library’s collection. Core tasks include receiving, processing, barcoding, and cataloging physical and digital collections in both MARC and non-MARC formats to international standards; performing quality control and resolving discrepancies for bibliographic records, utilizing Sierra software; sending and receiving orders and invoices in accordance with international EDIFACT protocols from all major book vendors; loading bibliographic records via FTP from bibliographic cataloging vendors and communicating with them for proper quality control; processing materials for offsite, withdrawals, and Wert commercial bookbinding; departmental library management and maintenance; managing cataloging of the reference collection in the Drawings and Prints; processing books for departmental libraries; managing daily recalls (average of 120 per month) between curatorial staff; and conducting a detailed inventory of library materials checked out to Museum staff. Provides outstanding service to all library patrons at the Circulation and Registration Desks on a daily basis.

This position reports to the Associate Manager of Circulation and Reader Services. The schedule is MondayFriday.

Please submit a cover letter stating your interest and your CV, addressed to the search committee to lib.search@metmuseum.org.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILIES & DUTIES:

  • Utilizes knowledge of RDA/AACR2 and the LC Classification system to create high quality descriptive and technical metadata in both MARC and non-MARC formats for both physical and digital collections; catalogs research materials in all formats according to national standards
  • Assists with data loads of bibliographic and authority records and financial data from vendors using EDIFACT, systems maintenance, and Sierra library software
  • Assists in processing and cataloging of gifts for Watson and departmental libraries
  • Assists with collection management including offsite processing, withdrawals, and departmental library maintenance
  • Collaborates with library staff to maximize the functionality of our integrated library software, Sierra, to assess best practices and streamline workflow for inventory, collections management, recall procedures, and cataloging
  • Manages the daily recall process of library materials between curatorial staff and the circulation of departmental library materials for Museum staff
  • Coordinates with departing Museum staff to ensure all library materials are returned
  • Maintains an ongoing and accurate inventory of materials checked out to Museum fellows
  • Processes overdue notices for departmental library books
  • Assists with the maintenance of the circulation database in Sierra, including creating and updating item and patron records
  • Responsible for cataloging the reference collection in the Drawings and Prints departmental library
  • Assists in departmental book retrieval and circulation for library patrons
  • Coordinates with curatorial departments to conduct a detailed inventory of library materials checked out to Museum staff
  • Provides outstanding customer service in daily Circulation and Registration Desk shifts
  • Occasional weekend work required
  • Other duties as assigned

REQUIREMENTS & QUALIFICATIONS:

Experience and Skills:

  • Library experience required
  • Excellent customer service skills required
  • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills required
  • Ability to do detailed work accurately and independently required
  • While performing duties of this job, the employee must frequently lift and/or move up to 25 pounds and occasionally lift and/or move up to 50 pounds and also push or pull objects weighing 30-400 pounds on wheels (book trucks).

Knowledge and Education:

  • Work toward or completion of an MLS preferred
  • Experience using an automated integrated library system and preferred
  • Knowledge of RDA/AACR2, LC Classification and MARC21 preferred

The Thomas J. Watson Library is the central research library of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Reflecting the depth and scope of the Museum’s collection, the library collects scholarly material from the art of early antiquity to contemporary art. Like the Museum, the library’s holdings are encyclopedic and global in nature and provide a broad range of research materials on Ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek and Roman, Asian, Islamic, European and American art. In addition to its extensive collection of monographs, exhibition catalogs and rare books, the library includes 150,000 auction and sale catalogs dating from the eighteenth century to the present day. Watson Library’s staff of thirty eight adds nearly 20,000 volumes a year, manages a large collection of electronic resources, and continues to build its digital collections, now comprising over one million pages of online content.

The Museum’s library system includes The Robert Goldwater Library, covering the art of Africa, Oceania and the Americas; Nolen Library, providing materials for all ages on the history of art and also curriculum related material for teachers; The Lehman Collection Library, a collection on European painting and decorative arts; The Joyce F. Menschel Library in the Department of Photographs; The Onassis Library in the Department of Greek and Roman Art; The Irene Lewisohn Costume Reference Library; and the Cloisters Library for medieval art and related topics. The Museum’s departmental libraries contribute to combined holdings of more than one million volumes, a collection unrivaled in depth and coverage for the history of art on a global scale.

See https://www.metmuseum.org to learn more about the Museum’s libraries, including access policies and hours, and to connect to the libraries’ catalog, Watsonline.

Brooks McNamara Performing Arts Librarian Scholarship

Sponsored by the Theatre Library Association, this scholarship acknowledges outstanding accomplishments of promising students specializing in performing arts librarianship and currently enrolled in an ALA-accredited MLIS program or an archival training program.

This year’s theme: “How can performing arts library/archives professionals help create a more equitable and inclusive society?”

You might want to discuss what initiatives you have started or been involved with, comment on initiatives led by others, propose possible new approaches, and other topics.

Submit: A 500-to-1000-word essay on the topic: “How can performing arts library/archives professionals help create a more equitable and inclusive society?”; the application form; an up-to-date resume; and contact information for three references.

For more info, see: http://www.tla-online.org/awards/professionalawards/ (you have to scroll about halfway down the page for the Brooks McNamara Scholarship)

Job posting: University Archivist, University of North Carolina School of the Arts, Winston-Salem, NC

Posting Details
Position Information
Working Title University Archivist
Position Type EHRA Tier II
Position Number 060112
Full/Part Time Full-time
School/Department Information
The Library and Learning Commons provides materials and services which support the University of North Carolina School of the Arts’ education, artistic, and performance objectives, and which serve the intellectual, informational, and cultural needs of the students, faculty, and staff of the school, as well as other members of the local community. As a unit of the Library, the Archives exists as the institutional memory of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, documenting the school’s history from its extraordinary beginning to its present day standing as one of the world’s premiere arts schools.

Work Schedule and hours
Description of Responsibilities and Duties
The Library and Learning Commons provides materials and services which support the University of North Carolina School of the Arts’ education, artistic, and performance objectives, and which serve the intellectual, informational, and cultural needs of the students, faculty, and staff of the school, as well as other members of the local community. As a unit of the Library, the Archives exists as the institutional memory of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, documenting the school’s history from its extraordinary beginning to its present day standing as one of the world’s premiere arts schools.

The University Archivist:
– Oversees cataloging, discovery, preservation, and promotion of the collection that documents the student, faculty, and institutional experience of the University using best practices and professional standards.

– Manages relationships with campus shareholders for the continual intake of institutional records and archival materials, both electronic and physical and in a range of types and formats. Administers University Records in compliance with the NC Public Records Act, and as liaison with the State Records Management Office.

– Supervises one part-time employee and Archives volunteers.

– Conducts continued outreach to campus shareholders, including faculty, staff, students, alumni, and donors, to nourish creative teaching and learning on campus and to promote knowledge and understanding of the origins and development of the programs and goals of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. Is an active part of the archives life cycle at UNCSA by promoting campus documentation of performance and the creative process.

– Integrates archival collections with course curricula by working closely with faculty, providing instructional sessions around primary sources, and exposing library users to UNCSA history through exhibitions, displays, social media, and other forms of outreach.

– Creates digital access points to all collections through current cataloging and description standards; articulates, manages, and trains staff on cataloging workflows.

– Supports researchers at UNCSA and external to the institution with an ability to adapt to new research paradigms in the arts and humanities.

– Serves on campus-wide committees as needed and remains professionally active to stay current with trends and changes in the profession.

– Coordinates with the University Librarian and the Office of Advancement on fundraising and grant writing efforts.

Minimum Qualifications
Master’s degree in Library/Information Science/Archives & Records Management from an ALA-accredited institution with 2 years of professional experience as a librarian or archivist.

Preferred Qualifications
– Arts and/or humanities background

– Demonstrated experience working with diverse collections and shareholders

– Experience with curation and/or collection development

– Proven ability and enthusiasm for bringing innovation and creative thinking to the workplace

Terms of Employment E2
Knowledge, Skills and Abilities
– Command of archival theory and best practices, both for physical and electronic collections.

– A strong knowledge of digitization and cataloging workflows as well as the born-digital archival lifecycle. Experience with archival content management systems as well as digital file formats, electronic records management, and digital persistence practice and theory.

– Ensures long-term retention of physical materials (non-electronic) with knowledge of preservation practice and storage.

– Knowledge of current copyright and privacy laws, donor restrictions, and permissions related to public access of paper and born digital records.

– Ability to supervise as well as work independently on projects. Ability to collaborate with the Library team and campus shareholders, as well as to identify and develop new partnerships that enhance the reputation and use of the UNCSA Archives.

Special Conditions for Eligibility
Posting Detail Information
Posting Number AS171P
Open Date 06/01/2018
Close Date
Open Until Filled Yes
Salary Range
Recruitment Range, if applicable
Special Instructions to Applicants
This is an EHRA position.

PLEASE NOTE: A criminal background check will be conducted on candidate finalist prior to the offer of employment.

Resumes WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of completing an electronic application. The application must be competed in full detail (including work history) for your qualifications to be considered.

Failure to complete the application process as required by state regulations WILL result in your application being rejected for the vacancy and you will not be considered for the position.

Other materials may be requested at a later time.

Applications will be treated confidentially until the final stages of the search process. Salary will be commensurate with experience.

Original job posting

A Success Story: An Interview with Kate Lambaria, Visiting Music & Performing Arts Librarian at the University of Illinois

In this Success Story, Kate describes her experience in the field of music and performing arts librarianship, wherein she has evolved from music researcher to graduate library assistant to branch librarian supporting the School of Music and the Departments of Dance and Theatre at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Can you tell us a little bit about your background, your current position, and how you got into the field of librarianship?

I have an undergraduate degree in music, with a concentration in ethnomusicology. I didn’t grow up using libraries and when I started college and was introduced to them, they were this mysterious space that I didn’t understand how to navigate. I learned eventually because having an ethnomusicology focus meant that I did a lot more research than some of my peers in the music program. After finishing my undergraduate degree, I spent some time stringing together multiple part-time jobs teaching marching bands and private lessons and working in retail. My patience for this didn’t last very long and that’s when I started to think about a career that would fit with what I knew I enjoyed: music, teaching (but not full-time), the research process, and working with people. Eventually, I realized that librarianship had the potential to offer all of those things, so I applied for and was accepted to the MSLIS program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I worked as a graduate assistant in two of the libraries on campus, including the Music & Performing Arts Library where I now work, and that experience really cemented my interest in academic music librarianship.

I’m currently the Visiting Music & Performing Arts Librarian at Illinois and I work in a branch library that is one of many on campus. My library supports the School of Music and the Departments of Dance and Theatre. We’re located in the Music Building and the School of Music is the largest of the three departments, so I get to put my background in music to use on a regular basis.

What is your favorite aspect of your job? What is unique or special about your role as a performing arts librarian?

I enjoy going into classrooms for instruction sessions and then seeing the same students later in the library, either using our resources or asking for help at our desk. I’ve heard some students mention how they don’t need to do research as performers, so it’s pretty rewarding to see them realize the benefit of research on their performance, in addition to the many other ways the library can support them as performers. I also try to make it to some student performances every year and it’s really neat to see students I’ve worked with performing on stage. I guess the students are really my favorite aspect of my job!

One of the ways that performing arts librarianship is unique is the collections and the many formats that are needed. For example, if I buy a book about a specific piece of music, that leads to many questions…. do we have a score for that piece in our collection? What kind of score is it (score and parts for each instrument, just the score, a vocal score)? Who published the score? Do we have a recording (audio or video)? Who was the conductor/ensemble/soloist/choreographer… the list goes on. This impacts public services as well as collection development. There’s a lot to take into consideration when helping performing arts patrons find the information they’re seeking, and it does help to have a background in the performing arts.

What does a typical day at work look like for you?

Like many librarians, each day is different for me, but it usually consists of some combination of the following: collection development, reference and research support (I staff our reference desk 4 hours a week and each shift at the desk is always a surprise), instruction (both in class and through developing online materials), supervising our graduate assistants, and participating in programming and outreach. Right now, we’re moving to a new system for room and loanable technology reservations so I’m spending a lot of time working on that documentation for our library, developing staff training, and adjusting our policies accordingly. I’m also lucky to be at an institution that supports librarians conducting research, so depending on the day, I might be coding interviews or working on a literature review for a new project. Oh, and meetings, there’s always meetings.

Do you have any words of wisdom for students who are interested in the arts and may be considering a career in performing arts librarianship?

I don’t think I’m qualified to be dealing out words of wisdom yet, but I think it’s important to remind current LIS students that you’re probably never going to feel ready going into your first position, you just have to be prepared for that and willing to learn. My first position was as a liaison librarian to the architecture, art, dance, film, music, and theatre departments and while I felt comfortable with some of those subject areas, I knew nothing about architecture and art. So, I joined ARLIS, started reading the literature in the art librarianship field, and tried to build a network of peers. While I only work with the performing arts now, I still keep up with what’s happening in art librarianship. It can be easy to stay in your own specialized world, but there’s a lot to learn from librarians working in other subject areas. There are also many types of careers in performing arts librarianship, but I only have experience in an academic setting.

What were/are some challenges for you as a librarian?

Being early career, I have a tendency to say yes to every opportunity that comes my way. There’s a lot about librarianship that interests me, but this can also make it challenging to focus and prioritize my time. Sure, saying yes to opportunities allows me to explore new things and determine if it’s an interest worth pursuing further, but saying yes to everything is completely unrealistic, so now I’m working on learning to say no. Or, at the very least, to take more time considering how new commitments will fit into my schedule and existing long-term projects before saying yes.

Job posting: Library Information Specialist IV (Fine Arts Night Supervisor) – Baylor University, Waco, TX

Job Title Library Information Specialist IV (Part Time Nights)
Position Type Technical/Paraprofessional
City Waco
State TX
Zip 76798
Purpose
The purpose of this position is to serve as the Fine Arts Night Supervisor. This position provides reference and research services, supervising night student staff, assisting with circulation, reserves, and collection processing during evening and late night hours up to 1am.

Job Duties
Required Education Bachelor’s
Field of Study
Required Experience Less than 1 year of relevant work
Other Required Qualifications
-Strong user-service commitment
-Excellent organizational skills
-Attentive to detail and accuracy
-Effective written and oral communication skills -Strong interpersonal skills
-Demonstrated ability to work both independently and in a team setting
-Proficient with personal computing and a variety of technologies
-All employees are expected to fully support Baylor’s mission to educate men and women for worldwide leadership and service by integrating academic excellence and Christian commitment within a caring community.

Preferred Education Bachelor’s
Preferred Field of Study
Preferred Experience 2 years of relevant work
Other Preferred Qualifications
-Ability to read music beyond an elementary level
-Creative
-Flexible
-Forward-thinking
-Self-initiated
-Prior supervisory experience

Part time/Full time Part Time
Avg Hours per Week 25
Work Hours Sunday – Thursday 8:00 PM- 1:00 AM
Physical Demands
See Job Description

About Baylor
Working at Baylor is so much more than simply having a job! As part of the Baylor family, employees not only receive a comprehensive benefits package that includes medical and dental insurance, generous time off, and fantastic automatic retirement contributions, they also get to experience Baylor.

-Experience the culture of working for an institution consistently ranked as a “Great College to Work For” by The Chronicle of Higher Education
-Experience a mission driven organization based on a strong Christian commitment (www.baylor.edu/about)
-Experience Baylor academics with outstanding tuition remission for eligible staff and qualified dependents
-Experience our beautiful campus with access to libraries, museums, and recreational facilities such as our fitness center, athletic courts, an indoor swimming pool, and the Baylor marina to name a few
-Experience our great dining facilities and enjoy an employee discount
-Experience Baylor athletics with reduced admission or free access to athletic events
-Experience Baylor through many more wonderful events and programs that take place on campus each year
-Conveniently located in Waco, Texas, Baylor University is approximately 90 miles from both the Dallas-Fort Worth and Austin areas. To learn more about life in Waco, visit http://wacochamber.com/community/about-waco.

EEO Statement
Baylor University is a private not-for-profit university affiliated with the Baptist General Convention of Texas. As an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer, Baylor is committed to compliance with all applicable anti-discrimination laws, including those regarding age, race, color, sex, national origin, marital status, pregnancy status, military service, genetic information, and disability. As a religious educational institution, Baylor is lawfully permitted to consider an applicant’s religion among its selection criteria. Baylor encourages women, minorities, veterans and individuals with disabilities to apply.

Pay Rate Commensurate with education and experience

Link to original job posting