VRAF Workshop on Visual Literacy

The Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF) is pleased to announce that registration is now open for Learning to Look, Looking to Learn: A Workshop on Visual Literacy, to be held on February 22, 2017. This workshop will be hosted by the International Center for Photography in conjunction with the exhibition “Perpetual Revolution: The Image and Social Change,” and is open to cultural heritage professionals, the information and educational communities, and to anyone interested in visual culture. Learning to Look, Looking to Learn is one of four workshops being offered in the second year of the VRAF Regional Workshop Program.  The VRAF is grateful to the Samuel H. Kress Foundation for their continued support of this exciting opportunity to partner with cultural heritage and educational institutions. 

As our culture moves from an oral tradition to a visual one, strong visual literacy skills will be increasingly essential to interpreting the information around us. Learning to Look, Looking to Learn will provide participants with critical looking skills, as well as tools and techniques for enhancing the visual literacy of others. Part one of this workshop will be held at the International Center for Photography Museum, exploring visual literacy through objects in the exhibit “Perpetual Revolution: The Image and Social Change.” The afternoon session will be hosted at the International Center for Photography School. Through a variety of interactive exercises, this session will explore more advanced visual literacy concepts, and examine how participants might apply their new skills to their own work and institutions.

Learning to Look, Looking to Learn will be taught by Nicole E. Brown, the Multidisciplinary Instruction Library at New York University. Nicole’s research interests include innovative teaching practices and incorporating new literacies into teaching and learning environments. As a member of the ACRL Visual Literacy Task Force, she works to promote the integration of visual literacy into library instruction, and co-wrote Visual Literacy for Libraries, an ALA Editions book co-written with the three members of the Visual Literacy Task Force. 

The fee for this day-long workshop is $125.  To learn more about the workshop, and to register, please visit http://vrafoundation.org.s119319.gridserver.com/index.php/regional_workshops/visual_literacy_at_the_international_center_of_photography/

If you have questions about registration, feel free to contact Betha Whitlow, VRAF Director,bwhitlow@wustl.edu. For questions about the International Center for Photography venue, please contact Paul Rogers, Director of Public Programming and Content at ICP, PRogers@icp.org.

Visual Resources Association Foundation 2016-2017 Internship Award

Award Description

The Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF) Internship Award provides financial support for graduate students preparing for a career in visual resources and image management. The award grants $4,000 to support a period of internship in archives, libraries, museums, visual resources collections in academic institutions, or other appropriate contexts. The recipient will receive a stipend of $3,000 for 200 hours completed at the host site. A professional development component of $1,000 supports conference attendance or attendance at the Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management. The recipient will receive a one-year complimentary student membership in the Visual Resources Association.

Who May Apply

Students currently enrolled in, or having completed within the last 12 months, a graduate program in library or information science, art history, architectural history, architecture, visual or studio art, museum studies, or other applicable field of study may apply for this award. Applicants must have completed at least 10 credits of their graduate coursework before the application deadline, or demonstrate an equivalent combination of coursework and relevant experience.

Internship Description

Only one VRAF Internship is awarded per year. Priority will be given to applicants who submit projects that support art historical research and scholarship. Although the award recipient need not hold US citizenship or be a permanent resident of the US, the recipient must select an institution in the United States to act as host for the internship. This institution must be approved by the VRAF Internship Award Committee. VRAF and VRA are not responsible for matching candidates with a host institution, but will gladly assist with the process. An up to date list of host institutions can be found here.

This Internship Award will be granted for the 2016-2017 academic year. The intern is required to work on site at their chosen host institution for a minimum of 200 hours. The intern will choose to initiate their internship in the fall of 2016 or the winter or spring of 2017. The internship must begin within 30 days of the official beginning of the selected academic session of the participant’s home institution and be completed within one academic semester or two academic quarters. Exceptions are allowed by agreement between the selected intern and the VRAF Internship Awards Committee. In all cases, the internship must be completed within twelve months of the recipient being notified of the award.

The intern and the internship supervisor will complete brief evaluations of the internship experience. This report must be received by the VRAF Internship Committee by March 1, 2017.

The VRAF Internship Award will provide a stipend of $3,000 to the intern. Half of the award will be granted prior to the internship, with the remainder granted upon completion of the internship and receipt of a letter to the Chair of the VRAF Internship Committee signed by the internship supervisor and the intern stating that the 200 hours have been completed. If the recipient is not a US citizen, the VRAF is required by the IRS to withhold a percentage of this award.

A professional development component of $1,000 is available to support attendance at the national VRA conference, other appropriate conferences, or the Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management. The recipient will be reimbursed upon submission of receipts and documentation. The award recipient will be formally recognized during the Awards ceremony at the VRA conference.

The recipient will receive a one-year complimentary student membership in the Visual Resources Association.

Interns may have the option of receiving academic credit for the internship as part of their graduate course work but will be responsible for making those arrangements themselves.

How to Apply

To apply for the award, please submit the following:

  • A current resume.
  • A current transcript [this does not need to be issued directly from the institution].
  • An essay of up to 400 words addressing the applicant’s professional goals, learning expectations of the internship experience, and any skills or background that might benefit visual resources. A brief clear description of the proposed project is required.
  • The names of two professional or scholastic references with address, telephone numbers, and email addresses.
  • Host institution and contact information of internship supervisor.
  • Application materials in electronic form are preferred and should be submitted as a single PDF file to:
    Margaret Webster
    Visual Resources Consultant
    Phone: 607-257-3365
    Email: mnw3@cornell.edu

Host Institutions

Responsibility for institutional selection will remain with the award recipients rather than the VRAF. The Internship Award Committee is not responsible for matching candidates with a host institution but will gladly assist in the process. To help with this process, VRA’s Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students (VREPS) have compiled an ongoing list of institutions willing to host an intern.

Note to potential host institutions: You are invited to add your information to the VREPS Internship Award Host Sites by sending an email to Amy Lazet (alazet@COLLEGEFORCREATIVESTUDIES.EDU) with the following information: institution name, contact person, address, telephone, email, URL, and a brief description of the internship.

Deadlines for 2016-2017

  • July 31, 2016: Deadline for submission of applications to the VRAF Internship Award Committee.
  • August 21, 2016: VRAF Internship Award Committee announces the award recipient for 2016-2017.

The deadline for submission of evaluation forms and documents by the intern and the host institution will be within 30 days of the completion of the internship. The evaluation reports for a recipient who elects to complete the internship during the spring semester or quarter must be received by March 1, 2017. The remaining documents verifying the completion of the internship may be submitted later.

Monies from the Internship Award may not be used to cover indirect costs at institutions.

Additional Information

For additional information please contact the Committee Chair:
Margaret Webster
Visual Resources Consultant
Phone: 607-257-3365
Email: mnw3@cornell.edu

Full post: http://vrafoundation.org.s119319.gridserver.com/index.php/grants/internship_award

Twitter chat: #critlib on Visual Literacy, May 17th at 9pm EST

visual culture/literacy

Tomorrow night, join us on Twitter at #critlib to talk about visual culture and literacy for librarians. You’ll need a Twitter account to participate, but not to observe. (And you can wait a few days until someone storifies the tweets if you want to read them later in a more functional chronological display.)

I’ll be in transit during most of the chat but I hope to pop in. (As you may recall, I have some opinions about visual literacy in the digital age.)

Call for Proposals: ArLiSNAP/VREPS Virtual Conference

ARLISNAP Conference 2016

Proposal deadline has been extended, please submit via this link by Friday, April 8th

ArLiSNAP (Art Library Students and New ARLIS Professionals) and VREPS (Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students) are joining forces to host a virtual conference this May! The conference, Future Perspectives in Art Librarianship: Digital Projects and Initiatives, will take place at 12pm CST May 21, 2016. The conference will consist of a keynote speaker followed by 1.5 to 2 hours of presentations by students and new professionals. This is an excellent opportunity for those who cannot be physically present at our annual conferences to share projects and ideas.

 

Our keynote speaker will be Sara Rubinow. Sara is a Metadata Specialist in the Metadata Services Unit of NYPL Labs, The New York Public Library’s digital innovation unit. Prior to NYPL, Sara worked on projects involving the collections database, digital initiatives, and printed matter at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Sara will discuss her role at NYPL Labs and showcase initiatives intended to engage developers, scholars, artists, and the general public in exploring—and transforming—NYPL’s digital resources and open data sets.

 

We are looking for students and new professionals with an interest in art librarianship or visual resources management to present their work. The theme for this year’s conference is focused on digital projects and initiatives. Have you been working on a project using technology in a new way? Do you have thoughts to share on topics such as metadata and visual resources, copyright and the arts, digital collections, or visual literacy? Would you like to share your work with the ARLIS and VRA communities? Submit your proposal, and add your voice to our discussion on the future of the field!

 

Requirements:

  1. Presenters must be MLIS students or new professionals with fewer than five years of experience in the field.
  2. Presentations will be between ten and fifteen minutes in length.
  3. Presenters need to be available for a live presentation and brief Q&A session on the afternoon of Saturday, May 21, 2016. Presenters need to be available for a practice session the week before to test equipment. A date and time for the practice session will be determined at a later date.

 

Submit your proposal via this link by Friday, April 1st.

 

If you have any questions about this event, please don’t hesitate to contact Breanne Crumpton, ArLiSNAP Conference Planning Liaison, at becrumpton [at] gmail [dot] com.

Student Essay Contest: “indexing and retrieval of non-textual information” by ASIS&T

http://www.asis.org/SIG/SIGAH/2016/01/15/2016-cfsp/

 

The Special Interest Group for Arts and Humanities (SIG-AH) and the Special Interest Group for Visualization, Images, & Sound (SIG-VIS) of the Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T) are seeking previously unpublished papers for a Master’s and a PhD student research paper award. Finalists will be invited to present their research at the Second Virtual Symposium on Information and Technology in the Arts and Humanities (April 27 and 28) and winners will receive a Best Student Paper award and cash prize. Finalist presentations and papers will be archived with other material from the event and published in a formal 2016 Symposium Proceedings.

2016 Virtual Symposium website (details to come): http://www.asis.org/SIG/SIGAH/2016/01/15/2016-symposium/

2015 Virtual Symposium Proceedings: http://www.asis.org/SIG/SIGAH/2015/05/26/virtual-symposium-proceedings/

2016 Theme

The contest theme “indexing and retrieval of non-textual information” is open-ended to invite participation from a variety of theoretical and empirical perspectives on the topic. We encourage graduate-level submissions from a broad range of disciplines including arts, humanities, library and information science, and computer science. Suggested paper topics include, but are not limited to, past research, case studies, and current projects in the areas of:

  • Digital curation of sound and image collections
  • Open access and non-textual material in the humanities
  • Linked data/linked open data
  • Discovery, access, and use of visual content
  • Data curation and data repositories
  • Working with multimedia source materials (maps, models, 3D reconstructions)
  • Visualization in digital collections
  • Search and discovery in the fine and performing arts

Who is Eligible?

Submissions can be made as a single author or a group of authors, including collaborations between students from different institutions. All submitted works should be previously unpublished. Authors do NOT need to be members of ASIS&T. All research is expected to be purely the students’ work. Research undertaken as part of a course, an internship experience, or a thesis project is eligible but attempts should be made to anonymize the paper. Authors are required to secure any necessary permissions related to research findings from internships and thesis projects being used in this research competition.

Requirements & Selection Criteria

While the contest theme and eligibility are open, papers should show an appropriate level of writing and should include an advanced theoretical or empirical discussion, methodology or analysis. Paper submissions must adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Word .doc or .docx format
  • Cover page with title, author names, institutional affiliations, and abstract of 250 words or less
  • 10 single-spaced pages or less (approximately 4,000 words), 12 pt. font, using APA citations and bibliography. Tables, graphs, images, etc…may appear within the body of the text.
  • No headers or footers (with exception of page number)
  • Author names should not appear anywhere in the main text

Submission details should be made via electronic form and final papers emailed by the April 4, 2016 deadline (details below).

Papers will be selected based on the following criteria: relevance of topic to the contest theme, originality of research and approach, and quality of student writing. Papers not meeting the above requirements may be excluded from the contest.

Students selected as finalists will be invited to present their research on April 27 or April 28 at the Second Virtual Symposium on Information and Technology in the Arts and Humanitieshttp://www.asis.org/SIG/SIGAH/2016/01/15/2016-symposium/. Award winners will be selected based on the quality of student presentations.

Awards

Two (2) finalist papers may be awarded the Best Master’s Student Paper or the Best PhD Student Paper, including a monetary prize of $500 and 1-year ASIS&T membership. Finalist presentations and papers will be archived with other material from the event and published in a formal 2016 Symposium Proceedings.

Submission and Deadline

Authors are invited to submit papers, based on the requirements and selection criteria above, by filling out the form at http://goo.gl/forms/WUJrlUtSle and emailing the final paper to ASIST.SIGAH {at} gmail.com before 11:59 pm PST, April 4, 2016.

Hack Your MLIS Program: Visual Resources Librarianship

Hi Arlisnappers! After a yearlong absence, I am back on the blog as a feature post writer and excited to be a part of the ArLiSNAP team once again. I recently graduated with my MLIS and I currently work as the Director of Visual Resources at the University of Georgia.

In April 2014, I shared my tips for hacking your MLIS program to focus on art librarianship. Now I’m back with a better-late-than-never follow-up on how I hacked my MLIS program to prepare for my career in visual resources librarianship. We have discussed how to plan your coursework so you are prepared to manage digital collections before, and this post will focus specifically on what you need to manage visual resources collections.

Visual Resources Center, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia. Image courtesy of Courtney Baron.
Visual Resources Center, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia. Image courtesy of Courtney Baron.

What is visual resources librarianship?

Visual resources librarianship is a bit different from art librarianship, though the two fields require similar skills and educational backgrounds. I have worked as a full-time visual resources professional for one year now, so I have a good idea of what the profession involves and what is required to do the job successfully. That being said, each position is unique depending on the needs of the institution. Visual resources professionals historically functioned as slide librarians, usually in art/art history departments or libraries. Now, we primarily manage digital image collections, though slide collections still exist at many institutions, and assist faculty and students with their image needs. We may also manage public visual resources spaces that range from digital scanning and projects labs to libraries with circulating materials.

Become involved in VRA

The Visual Resources Association (VRA) is smaller than ARLIS, but equally as welcoming. Hands down, this is the best way to get – and stay – connected to the field, especially if you are one of the few people in your program interested in art and visual resources librarianship. Not only do you have access to a large network of art and visual resources professionals, but you can also follow news, concerns, and trends on the VRA listserv. I encourage you to be active on the listserv as well since name recognition can help you in your job search later on! Seriously – my predecessor was very active, and I get asked about him all the time. If you have been involved with ARLIS but haven’t yet ventured into VRA, there is a joint conference next year in Seattle, WA, so it will be an opportune time to check out both organizations and annual conferences. There is also a similar group to ArLiSNAP called vreps – visual resources association emerging professionals and students – that you should join. The VRA Bulletin is the journal of the association and each issue contains a wealth of information about current issues and practices in the field.

Focus coursework and projects on visual resources topics

As I said in part one, the best way to ensure you are getting a similar education to a MLIS program that does offer an art librarianship track is to see which courses they require and which electives they offer. I also recommend looking at similar tracks, such as digital content/asset management or archives. I recommend courses on the following topics, since they relate to visual resources: humanities information services, digital libraries, descriptive cataloging and metadata, database design, digital humanities, and digital archives. Basically, looks for classes that focus on metadata, technologies, databases, and managing or curating digital archives, libraries, and other collections. These classes will give you an overview of the information you need and you can focus your projects and papers specifically on arts and humanities topics.

Independent study

In part one, I discussed an independent study on art and visual resources librarianship that I designed as an elective in my MLIS program. If you would like more information on that, I’m happy to share my syllabus and course projects in a later post.

This time, I’m focusing on what you can do independently outside of coursework to build some of the skills you need to work in visual resources.

Photography, Photoshop, and Lightroom 

Knowledge of photography, especially editing software, is very helpful for managing image collections. I still have a lot to learn about photography, but I have heard that ShootFlyShoot has fantastic photography classes. Why is this important? So you understand how the images you work with are produced, and you can produce images if required. Some visual resources positions require original photography of works of art, either from works in museum or galleries, or from faculty and student work. I do not produce original photography in my current position, but I do a lot of scanning, and knowledge of photographic editing techniques is essential. I use Adobe Photoshop, and recommend Photoshop Classroom in a Book to learn the basics of using Photoshop. The book has a disc with tutorials and sample images to practice editing. Adobe Lightroom is a simpler and easier way to edit images and is preferred over Photoshop by some visual resources professionals.

Metadata

Just like a library book would be lost without a catalog record, images would be lost without good metadata. I believe that metadata is perhaps the most important part of managing image collections. After all, what’s the point of having a collection if your content cannot be easily found? Just as there are cataloging standards and formats for cataloging books, archival materials, etc., these also exist for visual resources collections. Cataloging Cultural Objects (CCO) is a content standard for visual resources collections (comparable to RDA) and VRA Core is a metadata schema used to describe images (comparable to MARC). If you have access to Adobe Bridge, you can download the VRA Core panel and practice creating metadata for images. It’s also essential to be familiar with the Getty vocabularies, which are now available as Linked Open Data. The vocabularies will give you the structured terminology for art, architecture, and other materials and are essential tools for the proper cataloging of images.

Image resources

Working in visual resources doesn’t just mean managing image collections. There is a reference and instruction component. You must be able to help others find and locate images using subscription databases, institutional image collections, and free resources on the web. The most popular subscription database for images is Artstor Digital Library. If the institution where you attend school or work does not have a subscription, you can still check out the website or YouTube videos to learn more about how the database works and how to use it. There is a section with free guides, including subject-specific guides, and studying these is an excellent way to increase your knowledge of this resource.

Visual resources professionals manage institutional image collections or archives. These collections can include images from faculty and student image requests, images from digitized slides, images purchased from vendors, and images related to institutional history. In order to properly manage these image collections, you need to know how digital asset management systems work. A broad knowledge of DAMs is important, because there are many different systems out there. The most popular DAMs for visual resources include Artstor’s Shared Shelf, Luna Imaging, and Madison Digital Image Database (MDID). These can be high cost for some institutions, so in-house solutions are also popular.

You also need to know how to locate high-quality and accurate images on the web. Libguides are an excellent way to compile these resources, and many institutions have great libguides on locating images for you to browse and study. My personal philosophy behind libguides, or curating image resources in general, is this: quality over quantity. Your job isn’t to know all instances of where to find images of the Mona Lisa. Your job is to know where to find the best images of the Mona Lisa.

Copyright and fair use

You also need to know how the images you manage, or how images available in subscription databases or on the web, can be used. This is why copyright and fair use comes into play. For general information on copyright law, look at Copyright Law for Librarians and Educators: Creative Strategies and Practical Solutions. For copyright information related to the visual arts, your best resources are from the College Art Association. Copyright, Permissions, and Fair Use among Visual Artists and the Academic and Museum Visual Arts Communities was released in 2014 and and the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts was released earlier this year. Study these documents and know them well.

Get experience – if you can

Some institutions don’t have a visual resources collection, but those that do usually need help. Don’t hesitate to reach out to a visual resources professional and ask if you can volunteer, intern, or even just visit the collection and learn more about what they do and what a typical day is like for them.

So this is what I recommend doing as a library science student if you are interested in visual resources. If other visual resources professionals are reading this, I’m curious to hear what you also recommend!

Job Posting: Visual Resources Curator – FIT – NY,NY

Job Description:

Full-time staff member to curate digital-image databases for department teaching and other activities. Responsibilities include: acquiring and cataloguing digital images for in-house and subscribed databases; working with Department Technologist and FIT Library in maintaining and expanding FIT Digital Image Library (FITDIL); creating and managing workflow for digital-image database maintenance; working with faculty to maintain currency and accuracy of databases and their metadata; orienting new faculty with available databases; maintain survey-course and textbook files for course-specific image folders; responsibility for the department and major’s visual materials and presence in the college.

Requirements:

M.A. in Art History; reading knowledge of French, German, Italian; library experience: familiarity with ULAN, Library of Congress headings, Getty Thesaurus; computer literacy.

Job link here.

Job Posting: SAH and CAA Seek Digital Humanities Researcher – Deadline Extended

This position has several listed, conflicting dates — from what I can tell, the contract will start once the position has been filled, for eight months part-time, and the deadline for applications is January 15th. It does not appear to have an online application process, but interested applicants could contact:

Pauline Saliga, Executive Director
Society of Architectural Historians and Charnley-Persky House Museum Foundation

Position Description: Digital Scholarship Researcher

Period: January 2015 – July 1, 2015

College Art Association and the Society for Architectural Historians

Reports to the CAA and SAH Executive Directors and CAA Director of Publications

The Digital Scholarship Researcher will play an integral role in the development of Guidelines for Promotion and Tenure in Digital Art and Architectural History, a project of CAA and SAH funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Working closely with the CAA and SAH Presidents as Co-Chairs of the task force on digital scholarship, the Executive Directors of CAA and SAH, and the CAA’s Director of Publications, the Digital Scholarship Researcher will:

  • Identify fifteen universities and colleges where digital scholarship is developed and published by faculty, post doctoral students and graduate students in art and architectural history disciplines;
  • Review existing tenure and promotion guidelines to determine which criteria are applicable to digital scholarship; review newly developed criteria required for digital scholarship; and consider the processes used to develop guidelines in other disciplines
  • Review and compile bibliography of the extant literature for developing guidelines for digital scholarship;
  • Interview visual arts faculty and administrators who have developed new digital research tools, utilized visual and spatial technologies, and who have utilized new computational technologies in order to determine the different evaluative criteria needed for each category;
  • Interview members of tenure committees to determine how they presently evaluate digital scholarship in the visual arts and the criteria they would like to see included;
  • In consultation with a statistician, develop a survey to gather information from CAA and SAH members related to the evaluation of digital scholarship in the visual arts;
  • And prepare a summary draft of the research results with recommendations for criteria for tenure and promotion related to digital scholarship. Include bibliography of the extant literature for developing guidelines for digital scholarship. The draft will be reviewed by the CAA and SAH Presidents, Executive Directors, and the CAA Director of Publications before it is sent the task force which will develop the final guidelines.

Experience and skills: This position requires a graduate degree in a humanities field; knowledge of digital research, scholarship and publication in academic art history and architectural history; statistical data computation skills; and good writing and communication skills.

Schedule: CAA anticipates that this research project and the preparation of the recommendations to the task force will take eight (8) months from November 2014 through June 2015. His/her written report will be crucial to the task force will develop and published guidelines.

Residency: This position does not require residency in New York or Chicago where the CAA and SAH are located. The research will be conducted by phone, on the internet and at libraries. The presentation of the final research document to the task force will occur at one face-to-face meeting where the hotel and expenses will be compensated.

Compensation: $30,000 plus health insurance

Commitment: Half-time for eight months (December 2014 through July 1, 2015)

How to Apply: Please submit a CV with a cover letter and three references to: CAA Researcher, 50 Broadway, Floor 21, New York, NY 10004.

Deadline for Applications: January 15, 2015

Submit your proposal for the ArLiSNAP/VREPS Virtual Conference!

WebinarLogo

 

ArLiSNAP and VREPS (Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students) are joining forces to host a virtual conference this winter! The conference is titled Visualizing the Future: New Perspectives in Art Librarianship, and will take place on the afternoon of Saturday, January 17th, 2015.  This is an excellent opportunity for those who cannot be physically present at our annual conferences.

 

We are looking for students and new professionals with an interest in art librarianship or visual resources management to present their work. Have you been working on a project using technology in a new way? Do you have thoughts to share on topics such as metadata and visual resources, copyright and the arts, or visual literacy? Would you like to share your work with the ARLIS and VRA communities? Submit your proposal, and add your voice to our discussion on the future of the field!

 

Other sessions in this event will include:

  • A roundtable of new professionals, who will share advice about starting out in your career. The speakers will answer questions about their work, as well as their thoughts on the best ways to gain experience and job hunt in this field.
  • A panel on initiatives in art archiving, where speakers working on documentation and preservation will discuss their work, and suggest ways for students to get involved.
  • A keynote speech from art librarian Elizabeth Lane, who will discuss her current work and her thoughts on the future of the profession.

 

Requirements:

  1. Presenters must be MLIS students or new professionals with fewer than five years of experience in the field.
  2. Presentations will be between ten and fifteen minutes in length.
  3. Ideally, presenters will be available for a live presentation and brief Q&A session on the afternoon of Saturday, January 17th, 2015. However, pre-recording the presentation prior to the event may also be possible.

 

Submit your proposal via this link by Saturday, November 15th.

 

If you have any questions about this event, please don’t hesitate to contact Ellen Tisdale, ArLiSNAP Co-Moderator, at ellen.j.tisdale [at] gmail [dot] com.

Job Postings: Student Jobs at the University of Toronto

Graduate Student Assistant in Visual Resource Library

http://current.ischool.utoronto.ca/jobsite/2014/graduate-student-assistant-visual-resource-library

Description and duties:

The graduate student will help to digitize teaching, research and archival collections for FADIS and other image resource collections at the University of Toronto. This position will involve skills and knowledge about the visual arts and an interest in in archives or museums. An interest in cataloguing is important.

Qualifications:

This position will involve skills and knowledge about the visual arts, archives or museums. An understanding of archival inventories and/or museum collections would be helpful. Knowledge of basic computer programs, as well as, photoshop for editing images is required.

Candidates must be eligible for the work study program.

Compensation:

$18.00 per hour for a maximum of 120 hours; starting October 2014 through to April 2015; flexible work hours can be arranged.

Archives Assistant

http://current.ischool.utoronto.ca/jobsite/2014/archives-assistant-5

Description and duties:

Sexual Representation Collection, Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies

The Sexual Representation Collection at the Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies is looking to hire an archival assistant for a work study position. The student will work on a team to complete a variety of listing and housing projects as well as aid in hosting researcher hours and contributing to other projects through the year as needed. Please forward cover letter, resume and a copy of unofficial transcript to curator nicholas.matte@utoronto.ca

Qualifications:

The ideal candidate will be interested in sexuality and general archives management, as well as have some experience working in archives, especially archival listing and housing.

Compensation:

This is a work study contract position for 180 hours between hire date and February 27, 2015. No more than 12hr/week, $11/hour, 4% vacation pay.