Visual Resources Association Foundation 2016-2017 Internship Award

Award Description

The Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF) Internship Award provides financial support for graduate students preparing for a career in visual resources and image management. The award grants $4,000 to support a period of internship in archives, libraries, museums, visual resources collections in academic institutions, or other appropriate contexts. The recipient will receive a stipend of $3,000 for 200 hours completed at the host site. A professional development component of $1,000 supports conference attendance or attendance at the Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management. The recipient will receive a one-year complimentary student membership in the Visual Resources Association.

Who May Apply

Students currently enrolled in, or having completed within the last 12 months, a graduate program in library or information science, art history, architectural history, architecture, visual or studio art, museum studies, or other applicable field of study may apply for this award. Applicants must have completed at least 10 credits of their graduate coursework before the application deadline, or demonstrate an equivalent combination of coursework and relevant experience.

Internship Description

Only one VRAF Internship is awarded per year. Priority will be given to applicants who submit projects that support art historical research and scholarship. Although the award recipient need not hold US citizenship or be a permanent resident of the US, the recipient must select an institution in the United States to act as host for the internship. This institution must be approved by the VRAF Internship Award Committee. VRAF and VRA are not responsible for matching candidates with a host institution, but will gladly assist with the process. An up to date list of host institutions can be found here.

This Internship Award will be granted for the 2016-2017 academic year. The intern is required to work on site at their chosen host institution for a minimum of 200 hours. The intern will choose to initiate their internship in the fall of 2016 or the winter or spring of 2017. The internship must begin within 30 days of the official beginning of the selected academic session of the participant’s home institution and be completed within one academic semester or two academic quarters. Exceptions are allowed by agreement between the selected intern and the VRAF Internship Awards Committee. In all cases, the internship must be completed within twelve months of the recipient being notified of the award.

The intern and the internship supervisor will complete brief evaluations of the internship experience. This report must be received by the VRAF Internship Committee by March 1, 2017.

The VRAF Internship Award will provide a stipend of $3,000 to the intern. Half of the award will be granted prior to the internship, with the remainder granted upon completion of the internship and receipt of a letter to the Chair of the VRAF Internship Committee signed by the internship supervisor and the intern stating that the 200 hours have been completed. If the recipient is not a US citizen, the VRAF is required by the IRS to withhold a percentage of this award.

A professional development component of $1,000 is available to support attendance at the national VRA conference, other appropriate conferences, or the Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management. The recipient will be reimbursed upon submission of receipts and documentation. The award recipient will be formally recognized during the Awards ceremony at the VRA conference.

The recipient will receive a one-year complimentary student membership in the Visual Resources Association.

Interns may have the option of receiving academic credit for the internship as part of their graduate course work but will be responsible for making those arrangements themselves.

How to Apply

To apply for the award, please submit the following:

  • A current resume.
  • A current transcript [this does not need to be issued directly from the institution].
  • An essay of up to 400 words addressing the applicant’s professional goals, learning expectations of the internship experience, and any skills or background that might benefit visual resources. A brief clear description of the proposed project is required.
  • The names of two professional or scholastic references with address, telephone numbers, and email addresses.
  • Host institution and contact information of internship supervisor.
  • Application materials in electronic form are preferred and should be submitted as a single PDF file to:
    Margaret Webster
    Visual Resources Consultant
    Phone: 607-257-3365
    Email: mnw3@cornell.edu

Host Institutions

Responsibility for institutional selection will remain with the award recipients rather than the VRAF. The Internship Award Committee is not responsible for matching candidates with a host institution but will gladly assist in the process. To help with this process, VRA’s Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students (VREPS) have compiled an ongoing list of institutions willing to host an intern.

Note to potential host institutions: You are invited to add your information to the VREPS Internship Award Host Sites by sending an email to Amy Lazet (alazet@COLLEGEFORCREATIVESTUDIES.EDU) with the following information: institution name, contact person, address, telephone, email, URL, and a brief description of the internship.

Deadlines for 2016-2017

  • July 31, 2016: Deadline for submission of applications to the VRAF Internship Award Committee.
  • August 21, 2016: VRAF Internship Award Committee announces the award recipient for 2016-2017.

The deadline for submission of evaluation forms and documents by the intern and the host institution will be within 30 days of the completion of the internship. The evaluation reports for a recipient who elects to complete the internship during the spring semester or quarter must be received by March 1, 2017. The remaining documents verifying the completion of the internship may be submitted later.

Monies from the Internship Award may not be used to cover indirect costs at institutions.

Additional Information

For additional information please contact the Committee Chair:
Margaret Webster
Visual Resources Consultant
Phone: 607-257-3365
Email: mnw3@cornell.edu

Full post: http://vrafoundation.org.s119319.gridserver.com/index.php/grants/internship_award

ARLIS/NA Mountain West + VRA Wild West Virtual Conference 2016: Call for Proposals

See below for the ARLIS/NA Mountain West and VRA Wild West Chapters’ Virtual Conference 2016 Call for Proposals, due August 1. Students and new professionals are encouraged to submit! And you don’t even have to be a member of ARLIS/NA or VRA to do so!


 

ARLIS/NA Mountain West + VRA Wild West

Virtual Conference 2016 Call for Proposals

DEADLINE EXTENDED!

The ARLIS/NA Mountain West Chapter and The Wild West Chapter of VRA are teaming up to bring you a virtual conference in 2016. We would like to cordially invite you to submit proposals for the Virtual Conference 2016. With an extended deadline we also have decided to broaden the scope. Please feel free to submit a proposal for any project you have completed or that is a work-in-progress. The only criteria we ask proposals be limited to is work within the arts.

The extended proposal deadline is Monday, August 1.

Based on the success of the Mountain West Chapter’s new virtual conference format, we are eager to use the virtual format again. Similar to the last virtual conference, we need a diverse set of presenters. If you have an interesting project that you are currently working on or recently finished, please consider submitting a proposal to present it to your peers. Please note, this call for proposals is open to any; not only members of VRA and ARLIS.

Perhaps you had a proposal turned down for the ARLIS/NA national conference. Here is another opportunity to share it!

Here are the details:

  • Presenters will have their talks prerecorded by a member of our chapter and posted to a private site online.
  • A live Q&A session will happen in December with all the presenters.
  • Conference attendees will be given access to the site and will be able to watch all the presentations at their leisure.
  • Each talk will be accompanied by a discussion board for questions and comments.
  • Sessions will be recorded in late October and posted in November.
  • Each person will have a set amount of time to take and answer questions.
  • This session will be moderated by a member of the Mountain West chapter.
  • The Q&A Session will be recorded and posted to the site if attendees are unable to watch in real time.

Requirements:

1. Proposals need to be focused on the arts but the can include just about any subtopic.

2. Presentations should be limited to 20 minutes.

3. Presenter will work to find a time to record their presentation with a designated member of the Mountain West chapter.

4. Presenter must be available for a live, virtual Q&A session on December 2.

5. Each presenter will be asked to take questions for 10 to 15 minutes.

Click here to submit your proposal online: http://goo.gl/forms/SLbVY4S6oM

Please contact John Burns (burns at dixie dot edu) with any questions.

2016 AASL Student Travel Award

The Association of Architecture School Librarians (AASL) is now accepting applications for the 2016 AASL Student Travel Award. The award supports attendance at the AASL annual conference which will be held in Seattle, March 11-13, 2016. The application deadline is January 12, 2016. Details about the award follow.

PURPOSE

The AASL Student Travel Award is intended to introduce a library school student or recent graduate interested in a career in architecture school librarianship to the membership and activities of AASL through attendance at the organization’s annual conference.

AWARD

1. The amount of $600.00, to be awarded in person at the annual meeting

2. Waiver of annual AASL dues for a period of one year

ELIGIBILITY AND CONDITIONS

1. Students who are currently enrolled in an ALA accredited graduate program or individuals who have graduated from an ALA accredited program within twelve months of the application deadline are eligible to apply for this award.

2. The recipient of the award must confirm in writing via e-mail that she or he is able to meet the requirement of conference attendance.

3. The recipient of the award will submit a brief post-conference report for posting on the AASL Website. The report should outline conference activities and experiences and include an account of how the award supported professional development goals.

APPLICATION PROCESS

The application process consists of e-mailing a completed application form and a curriculum vitae to the chair of the AASL Awards Committee, Ed Teague, ehteague@uoregon.edu, no later than January 12, 2016. The application form can be found at https://sites.google.com/site/aaslawards/

MORE INFORMATION

Inquiries about the award should be directed to: Ed Teague, ehteague@uoregon.edu.

Learn more about AASL at http://www.architecturelibrarians.org/.​

The Association for Moving Image Archivists Announces the AMIA-Student Listserv!

Unfortunately, it’s only open to AMIA members. But it’s a good resource to know, especially if you plan to work with media (and especially if you don’t have an AMIA student chapter anywhere near you).

AMIA-Student-L is a listserv sponsored by the AMIA Education Committee for AMIA student members. AMIA-Student-L is intended as a forum to discuss AMIA activities, academic work, student chapter activities, projects/internships, professional development, to promote networking, and provide advice and support for students entering the workforce.

Only current AMIA members registered as students may be subscribed to the listserv.  Once that person registers as an individual AMIA (no longer a student) member they will be removed from AMIA-Student-L. If the student wishes to be removed from the listserv before that time, he/she will have to request the removal from the AMIA office (amia@amianet.org).

If you are a current AMIA Student member and would like to be registered to the listserv please visit http://www.amianet.org/node/1528 and follow the registration link. We hope this will be a valuable resource for our student members moving forward.

Note: This listserv is currently sponsored for one year. A survey will be distributed to student members toward the end the 2016 summer to determine if the listserv should become a permanent feature of the AMIA Student membership.

Hack Your MLIS Program: Visual Resources Librarianship

Hi Arlisnappers! After a yearlong absence, I am back on the blog as a feature post writer and excited to be a part of the ArLiSNAP team once again. I recently graduated with my MLIS and I currently work as the Director of Visual Resources at the University of Georgia.

In April 2014, I shared my tips for hacking your MLIS program to focus on art librarianship. Now I’m back with a better-late-than-never follow-up on how I hacked my MLIS program to prepare for my career in visual resources librarianship. We have discussed how to plan your coursework so you are prepared to manage digital collections before, and this post will focus specifically on what you need to manage visual resources collections.

Visual Resources Center, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia. Image courtesy of Courtney Baron.
Visual Resources Center, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia. Image courtesy of Courtney Baron.

What is visual resources librarianship?

Visual resources librarianship is a bit different from art librarianship, though the two fields require similar skills and educational backgrounds. I have worked as a full-time visual resources professional for one year now, so I have a good idea of what the profession involves and what is required to do the job successfully. That being said, each position is unique depending on the needs of the institution. Visual resources professionals historically functioned as slide librarians, usually in art/art history departments or libraries. Now, we primarily manage digital image collections, though slide collections still exist at many institutions, and assist faculty and students with their image needs. We may also manage public visual resources spaces that range from digital scanning and projects labs to libraries with circulating materials.

Become involved in VRA

The Visual Resources Association (VRA) is smaller than ARLIS, but equally as welcoming. Hands down, this is the best way to get – and stay – connected to the field, especially if you are one of the few people in your program interested in art and visual resources librarianship. Not only do you have access to a large network of art and visual resources professionals, but you can also follow news, concerns, and trends on the VRA listserv. I encourage you to be active on the listserv as well since name recognition can help you in your job search later on! Seriously – my predecessor was very active, and I get asked about him all the time. If you have been involved with ARLIS but haven’t yet ventured into VRA, there is a joint conference next year in Seattle, WA, so it will be an opportune time to check out both organizations and annual conferences. There is also a similar group to ArLiSNAP called vreps – visual resources association emerging professionals and students – that you should join. The VRA Bulletin is the journal of the association and each issue contains a wealth of information about current issues and practices in the field.

Focus coursework and projects on visual resources topics

As I said in part one, the best way to ensure you are getting a similar education to a MLIS program that does offer an art librarianship track is to see which courses they require and which electives they offer. I also recommend looking at similar tracks, such as digital content/asset management or archives. I recommend courses on the following topics, since they relate to visual resources: humanities information services, digital libraries, descriptive cataloging and metadata, database design, digital humanities, and digital archives. Basically, looks for classes that focus on metadata, technologies, databases, and managing or curating digital archives, libraries, and other collections. These classes will give you an overview of the information you need and you can focus your projects and papers specifically on arts and humanities topics.

Independent study

In part one, I discussed an independent study on art and visual resources librarianship that I designed as an elective in my MLIS program. If you would like more information on that, I’m happy to share my syllabus and course projects in a later post.

This time, I’m focusing on what you can do independently outside of coursework to build some of the skills you need to work in visual resources.

Photography, Photoshop, and Lightroom 

Knowledge of photography, especially editing software, is very helpful for managing image collections. I still have a lot to learn about photography, but I have heard that ShootFlyShoot has fantastic photography classes. Why is this important? So you understand how the images you work with are produced, and you can produce images if required. Some visual resources positions require original photography of works of art, either from works in museum or galleries, or from faculty and student work. I do not produce original photography in my current position, but I do a lot of scanning, and knowledge of photographic editing techniques is essential. I use Adobe Photoshop, and recommend Photoshop Classroom in a Book to learn the basics of using Photoshop. The book has a disc with tutorials and sample images to practice editing. Adobe Lightroom is a simpler and easier way to edit images and is preferred over Photoshop by some visual resources professionals.

Metadata

Just like a library book would be lost without a catalog record, images would be lost without good metadata. I believe that metadata is perhaps the most important part of managing image collections. After all, what’s the point of having a collection if your content cannot be easily found? Just as there are cataloging standards and formats for cataloging books, archival materials, etc., these also exist for visual resources collections. Cataloging Cultural Objects (CCO) is a content standard for visual resources collections (comparable to RDA) and VRA Core is a metadata schema used to describe images (comparable to MARC). If you have access to Adobe Bridge, you can download the VRA Core panel and practice creating metadata for images. It’s also essential to be familiar with the Getty vocabularies, which are now available as Linked Open Data. The vocabularies will give you the structured terminology for art, architecture, and other materials and are essential tools for the proper cataloging of images.

Image resources

Working in visual resources doesn’t just mean managing image collections. There is a reference and instruction component. You must be able to help others find and locate images using subscription databases, institutional image collections, and free resources on the web. The most popular subscription database for images is Artstor Digital Library. If the institution where you attend school or work does not have a subscription, you can still check out the website or YouTube videos to learn more about how the database works and how to use it. There is a section with free guides, including subject-specific guides, and studying these is an excellent way to increase your knowledge of this resource.

Visual resources professionals manage institutional image collections or archives. These collections can include images from faculty and student image requests, images from digitized slides, images purchased from vendors, and images related to institutional history. In order to properly manage these image collections, you need to know how digital asset management systems work. A broad knowledge of DAMs is important, because there are many different systems out there. The most popular DAMs for visual resources include Artstor’s Shared Shelf, Luna Imaging, and Madison Digital Image Database (MDID). These can be high cost for some institutions, so in-house solutions are also popular.

You also need to know how to locate high-quality and accurate images on the web. Libguides are an excellent way to compile these resources, and many institutions have great libguides on locating images for you to browse and study. My personal philosophy behind libguides, or curating image resources in general, is this: quality over quantity. Your job isn’t to know all instances of where to find images of the Mona Lisa. Your job is to know where to find the best images of the Mona Lisa.

Copyright and fair use

You also need to know how the images you manage, or how images available in subscription databases or on the web, can be used. This is why copyright and fair use comes into play. For general information on copyright law, look at Copyright Law for Librarians and Educators: Creative Strategies and Practical Solutions. For copyright information related to the visual arts, your best resources are from the College Art Association. Copyright, Permissions, and Fair Use among Visual Artists and the Academic and Museum Visual Arts Communities was released in 2014 and and the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts was released earlier this year. Study these documents and know them well.

Get experience – if you can

Some institutions don’t have a visual resources collection, but those that do usually need help. Don’t hesitate to reach out to a visual resources professional and ask if you can volunteer, intern, or even just visit the collection and learn more about what they do and what a typical day is like for them.

So this is what I recommend doing as a library science student if you are interested in visual resources. If other visual resources professionals are reading this, I’m curious to hear what you also recommend!

What I've learned since I graduated.

As of this writing, it’s been just about six months since my degree was awarded. I handed in my last coursework at the end of August 2014, and did some nail-biting while my thesis was graded. But I didn’t actually see my physical degree, framed and signed and in all its majesty, until last week, when I went home for Easter! It was surprisingly affecting — I didn’t think seeing my name all gussied up like that was going to be such a gut-punch of emotion, but I am really proud of that big piece of paper.

Between seeing that and reading this, I thought I’d try my hand at articulating a bit of perspective. It’s hard for me to write a “what I’ve learned” article without hedging my bets a bit — there are things I’ve started to dig into deeper, but I wouldn’t say I’m an expert or that my knowledge has yet paid off in practical terms. I started a full-time job as a corporate archivist the week after handing in my thesis, so a lot of what I can recommend isn’t directly applicable to arts librarianship or even the majority of MLIS/MISt graduates who might be reading this. But, I’m going to tell you what I do anyways, and it starts with how I …

1. Criticize myself. 

There is no time for a break, no time to kick back and separate yourself from the field once you hand in your last assignments. Chances are you’ve got a job offer lined up, unfinished research projects, a handful of applications to send out, a move, some volunteer commitments or conferences, or some other thing that should be occupying your time.

But you should prioritize a few hours (ideally with wine) to assess your situation, yourself, and your goals: what gaps are left in your education that will stand between you and your dream jobs? What experience do you lack based on the job postings you’re seeing? What’s the most likely progression going to be for you, from entry-level onwards? How can you prepare for each of those steps?

One of the best little tricks is to go back and read the term papers and assignment you handed in in your first semester. Does it make you cringe now to see how naive you were? Alternatively, aren’t you impressed with how far you’ve come in such a short time?

I never would’ve guessed I’d end up in corporate, but here we are, and I’m trying to look critically at which of the soft skills I’m picking up here (project management, training, research and policy-writing, etc.) are transferable and provable, and which ones I still need to acquire, so that I can start out at higher than entry-level when I get back into art and media work. But I have to acknowledge that some of my discipline-specific skills are getting rusty, so I …

2. Keep abreast.

Are you happy with all the listservs and newsfeeds you belong to? Could you stand to add more, or lose a few of the less-relevant options?

Personally, my feed for information on the profession comes from a couple of Canadian archiving lists, ARLIS, AMIA, SHARP, MCN, and the ALCTS eForum I mentioned previously. I’ve pared down a bit, and there are a few lists I’d like to be on for which I can’t afford a membership.

AMIA, for example, is a fantastic way just to keep in mind all the weird format issues and preservation challenges that multimedia workers face every day — there are always emails about finding a specific fitting for a rare tape player, or how best to clean a certain type of film with flourescent dye on it. If you’re bad at mechanical terminology, I guarantee you’ll pick it up quickly.

I use the Art News mailing that comes via CARLIS-L to remind me to check websites like Artforum and Canadian Art. Otherwise I tend to forget.

I don’t read any librarianship-specific websites regularly (other than job boards, for ArLiSNAP), but because of Twitter I’m constantly seeing blog posts from people like Barbara Fister on Inside Higher Ed, updates to journals, etc. If you want art-specific Twitter accounts to follow, check out the institutions and individuals that the ArLiSNAP account follows. (I follow a more eclectic collection, but hey, here are a couple suggestions.)

I can’t afford individual journal subscriptions, and I don’t have institutional access to that stuff, but I do read up on accessible (OA, PD) things when they go by in my feed. I only splurge on one physical publication, and that’s Cabinet Magazine, which doesn’t keep me up-to-date so much as inspire me regularly on all fronts.

On WordPress I follow things like Archives Gig, SNAP RT, most of the ARLIS SIGs’ and Sections’ blogs, and a few oddballs like Artist-Driven Archives and Failure in the Archives. I’m sure someone will tell me that I should consolidate or aggregate a bit better, but, nah.

CFPs

I’ve also got a special label in Gmail just for Calls For Proposals from the various listservs: I’m not going to apply for many this year, and most of them aren’t applicable to what I do, but I like being able to see what kinds of research and projects are being asked for, when the various deadlines come up, and which journals and conferences I might just want to consume without contributing to. But, occasionally, I do apply for stuff, because it’s always important to …

3. Hustle.

On top of the full-time job, I’ve got a few guest posts and articles queued up for publishing, two regular volunteer commitments (ArLiSNAP, and a journal I help copyedit) and some irregular ones (peer-reviewing for two journals), an ongoing data-mining project with a non-profit here in Toronto (no funding, just fun!), writing for ArLiSNAP and my own blog, and maintaining a Twitter presence of questionable quality.

I’ve done two conferences so far this year, and have two more to come (both speaking engagements, one of which is reporting on a yearly survey I run using Google Forms). This weekend I decided to start a project to improve listings of library and archives associations in Canada (probably with the goal of making Wikipedia pages for each). I have at least four copyright-related tumblrs I’d like to start. Now that I’m thinking of it, I volunteered to copyedit a new book by CARLIS, which I should be hearing about any day now ….

I think of all this as essential to keeping myself engaged with the fields I want to be in. As opposed to grad school, where my time was occupied in shallow exploration of a lot of subjects of varying interest to me, now I get to dig deep into the things I’m passionate about, and construct a broader career arc that includes artists’ practices and intents, copyrights and moral rights for creators, the history of print, preservation and access of both art and art-related documentation, and new techniques for analyzing art. Without calling it “personal branding,” I will say it was a lot easier to define some long-term research goals once I distanced myself from the generalist approach of my classes. Which leads me to …

4. Forget about everything I did in school.

No offense to my alma mater, but I didn’t leave school with a huge network of trusted peers and great professors (or respect for government funding for higher-ed, or ALA accreditation, or …). There was little critical education in the classes I took, which is understandable given the breadth of what has to be taught, but it meant I didn’t find people who thought and argued like I do. Being thrown into a room with people doesn’t guarantee you’ll find things to talk about — and the #1 thing I’ve learned since graduating is that there is a huge variance of why people got into this profession, and what it is they want to accomplish within it.

I moved away from Montreal when graduation was in sight, so I may have shot myself in the foot a little there (also I’m not on Facebook and am only a recent convert to Twitter), but I’ve managed to network so much better back in Toronto, without many ties to the people I spent a year and a half interacting with. A lot of it is online, through associations and listservs and volunteer work with eventual face-to-face meetings at conferences — and a lot of it is engaging people on social media once I’ve come to know and respect their work.

I think the best part of my MLIS was the four jobs I did during that time — one RA position, one job in the library, one internship for a design company, one summer contract with a non-profit — because it gave me at least some experience in a diversity of settings. While I am invested in the academic use of the degree, I wasn’t going to get a job without being able to articulate some proven skills and accomplishments. So, yeah, I recycled some term papers as applications for student awards, sure, but I don’t think my classwork and student chapter attendance are worth much now — and I’m sure they’re not all you have to offer the world, either. Which is why it’s good to ….

5. Stay smart about career moves.

I’ve taken to reading Get Bullish for career inspiration and advice; you might enjoy one or more of the following, if these questions are on your mind:

http://www.getbullish.com/2012/10/bullish-how-to-compete-when-youre-young-and-inexperienced/
http://www.getbullish.com/2015/04/bullish-qa-how-to-effectively-share-examples-of-your-work/
https://www.themuse.com/advice/no-really-these-are-the-best-conference-networking-tips-weve-ever-heard
http://www.getbullish.com/2012/03/bullish-the-nerdy-reflective-persons-guide-to-networking/
http://www.getbullish.com/2015/03/bullish-qa-how-do-you-get-motivated-for-a-huge-unimaginable-life-change-like-graduation/
http://www.getbullish.com/2012/06/bullish-three-tips-for-pitching-your-dream-gig-and-why-you-need-to-pitch/

I am also a fan of the Billfold, not just for the voyeurism involved in their “how other people do money” column, but for some of these:
http://thebillfold.com/2013/05/how-to-make-a-linkedin-profile-that-will-actually-help-you-get-a-job/
http://thebillfold.com/2013/02/meet-people-get-a-job-even-if-youre-an-introvert/
http://thebillfold.com/2012/05/reader-mail-how-much-should-i-be-earning-after-graduation/

 

… I think that’s it. Other than “Don’t be ashamed of using a lot of spreadsheets to get things done.”

Considering SEI? Take a Look at What Others Have to Say

Registration for the ARLIS/NA & VRAF Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management closes at the end of the month. If you haven’t signed up already then hurry to reserve your spot! You can register here.  Not sure how this workshop will benefit you and your career? Then check out a post from Ashley Peterson about her experience at SEI last year. You can find even more testimonials on the SEI workshop website.

Here are just some of the comments:

The SEI coursework proved to be exactly what I needed: the perfect balance of theoretical framework, practical application, and open communication between like-minded individuals.”

I am looking forward to attending SEI again, in order to refresh my knowledge with the most up-to-date information about all the subjects covered by SEI: cataloguing, image editing, transitioning skills, project planning, strategic planning, new social media platforms and applications, and intellectual property concerns.”

If you are interested in attending this year (or in the future), check out the SEI Facebook page for more information.

We would love to hear from you about your own experiences. How has SEI has benefited you? Feel free to share your story in the comments below.

SEI Registration Reminder

Places are still available for the 2015 Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management (SEI ), to be held June 9-12 at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. http://seiworkshop.org/

This intensive workshop features a curriculum addressing the latest requirements of today’s visual resources and image management professionals. This year’s topics and experienced instructors include:

  • Intellectual property rights: Nancy Sims (Copyright Program Librarian, University of Minnesota)
  • Metadata overview: Gretchen Gueguen (Data Services Coordinator, Digital Public Library of America)
  • Embedded metadata: Greg Reser (Metadata Specialist, University of California, San Diego Library)
  • Digital life-cycle: Liz Gushee (Digital Collections Librarian, Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin)
  • Digital preservation: Nicole Finzer (Visual Resources Librarian, Digital Collections Dept, Northwestern University)
  • Project management: Angela Waarala (Digital Collections Project Manager, University of Illinois Library), Nicole Finzer, Liz Gushee
  • Digital humanities: Jeannine Keefer (Visual Resources Librarian, University of Richmond)

SEI is suited to information professionals new to the field and more experienced professionals eager to respond to fast-changing technological advancements and job requirements. Recent attendees said they definitely would recommend SEI to others: “Good experience and a great way to interact with others doing what I do.” Another wrote ”SEI showed me the range of roles in the field, including what I might encounter in a different position.”

Discounted registration for members of VRA or ARLIS/NA is $595.

Like SEI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SummerEducationalInstitute?ref=hl

Listservs to follow: ALCTS eForum on internships

If you’re sitting at home and missing ARLIS’s annual conference right now, you might want to subscribe to this instead:

The ALCTS eForum has occasionally two-day intensive conversation on a particular topic. Yesterday was day one of interning — how to get the most out of it as a grad student / new professional, and how to offer good ones if you’re at an institution. Non-members can sign up, and you can access the archives if you just want to read without contributing here.

Good afternoon,

We are pleased to announce next week’s e-Forum entitled “Interning: A
Supervisor’s and Student’s Perspectives,” which is scheduled to start on
March 19, 2015.

Are you currently completing an internship or have any advice for those in
one? March’s e-Forum will focus on the sharing experiences and discussing
“what makes a great internship.” Topics will include: what are great
questions to ask a supervisor, how to choose the right location, how this
impacts your future career or how it helps with your current job, and so much
more. We look forward to a stimulating, valuable conversation about
internships and how they work for institutions, schools, and students.

Hosts

Professor Mary Wilkins Jordan has a BA and a BS from Quincy University, a JD
from Case Western Reserve University, an MLS from University of Wisconsin –
Milwaukee, and a doctorate from University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.
Prior to entering academia, Jordan worked in public libraries as a director
and administrator. Her research and consulting work now focuses on ways to
help libraries to function better and to serve their communities more
effectively. At the School of Library and Information Science at Simmons
College, she teaches Management and Evaluation classes, as well as Public
Libraries, Reference, and Internship, all with a focus on helping students
acquire the skills they need to be successful in their professional careers.
Prof Jordan can be reached by e-mail at mary.wilkinsjordan@simmons.edu. Her
mailing address is Mary Wilkins Jordan, Simmons College SLIS, 300 The Fenway,
Boston, MA 02115.

Kristen Gallant is currently a graduate student in her last semester of the
LIS program at the University of Missouri-Columbia. She has a B.A. and M.A.
in Art History, with a focus in Medieval and Renaissance art. Her academic
interests are in digital libraries, art libraries, special collections,
collection development, and metadata. Her current practicum project is based
on the Foliophile publication, Pages from the Past. The project is a
collaborative effort between the Digital Services and Special Collections
departments at the University of Missouri-Columbia that involves collection
development, digitization, research, metadata creation, and web publication
of individual leaves. After graduation, Kristen hopes to find employment as a
librarian of an art department or in a digital library.

The ALCTS e-Forum discussion takes place using email, and you can expect to
see a number of emails on this topic during the two-day duration.  When the
moderators kick off discussion, you will receive an email message.  To
participate, you simply send messages to alcts-eforum@lists.ala.org or
respond to an email sent to you.  The settings are designed so that responses
go to the entire list.  There is no special software or interface that you
have to use. If you wish to change topics or ask a new question, please
update the email subject line to identify your topic. This makes it easier
for others to follow the discussion. The moderators will be active during set
times of the e-Forum, but you are welcome to add to the discussion outside of
those times if that works better for your schedule.

News from the Off-Season: some conference cogitations

Happy February!

I’ve just gotten back to work after a five-day weekend. Three of those days were spent at the Ontario Library Association Super Conference, here in Toronto, so, not exactly a vacation, but definitely a change from the 9-5.

Besides a ton of useful tech sessions (including on OpenRefine for data cleaning, Koha [an open-source cataloguing system], and a review of the Google Art Project by some local ARLIS/NA student chapter members), this conference is basically the Canadian answer to ALA and draws 5,000 registrants.

Speaking of, ALA Midwinter happened this past weekend as well, with roughly the same numbers flocking to Chicago. They had Jason Segel as a keynote speaker, while we had Welcome to Night Vale. It’s a toss-up, really.

ALA, of course, being that body that accredits those programs we’re taking, has measurably more weight in the profession. They’re neck-deep in campaigns for governing positions, including someone that champions lowering the admission rates to MLIS/MI programs to compensate for the underemployment problem, and someone who thinks librarians are “the best profession in the world.” Sigh. (You can see the debate recording here.) If you’re an ALA member, I strongly suggest you vote in the elections.

A hot topic in both conferences was the new information literacy standards being passed by the ACRL — or, rather, the Framework, as the new concepts are being billed. I did some ranting about this subject a while ago, but I’ll remind you that the ACRL Visual Literacy Standards from 2011 were built upon those original IL standards, which means we should expect a VL-specific interpretation of the Framework in the near future. I have been trying to mull over what those will entail, but, it’s been a busy winter so far. I’d love to hear about your ideas, in the comments! (My first guess is going to be a threshold concept of “the realization that you’re committing copyright infringement basically every time you go online.”)

Meanwhile, back in Toronto, I was finding that quite a few of the conference sessions I attended were hard-pressed to name an audience: a curious newbie, or a field specialist? Even sessions with “current trends” in the titles spent the majority of their time rehashing the basics. I definitely valued the technology demonstrations, and the guides to cataloguing in certain metadata schemes, but I think I’m too niche in my interests to find the bulk of presentations at big library conferences to be worthwhile. And some of the most interesting sessions happened concurrently, so I couldn’t sit in on the session on 3D printing and copyright without missing that Google Art Project discussion down the hall.

But on the upside, I got these awesome socks:

“Due Date Card” Library Socks from Out of Print