Category Archives: Visual Resources Association (VRA)

SEI 2017 Instructor of the Week: Lisa Gregory

We’re thrilled to introduce the amazing instructors for this year’s Summer Educational Institute, many of whom are joining us for the first time! We’ll be highlighting one instructor from the 2017 curriculum each week, so be sure to stay tuned.

We’re happy to introduce Lisa Gregory, Program Coordinator for the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center. Lisa will be leading our Digitization Basics Workshop. Plan for your next digitization project in this workshop! We’ll cover scanning specs, budgeting, staffing and equipment considerations, grant writing and contract negotiations. We’ll discuss a variety of hardware and software option for a range of materials and project needs. Come with questions, leave with answers!

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Lisa Gregory

Did you know?

The North Carolina Digital Heritage Center (DHC) is a statewide digitization and digital publishing program through the North Carolina Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The DHC provides libraries, archives, museums, historical societies, and other cultural heritage institutions with the opportunity to promote and increase access to their collections through digitization, and is supported by the State Library of North Carolina, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and the UNC-Chapel Hill University Library. The DHC also serves as the North Carolina service hub for the DPLA!!

Lisa was a 2012 recipient of the Library of Congress National Digital Stewardship Alliance Innovation Award, which honors those who exemplify creativity, diversity and collaboration essential to supporting the digital community as it works to preserve and make available digital materials. Check out this interview with her. And Register for SEI to benefit from her knowledge directly!

6 weeks from today SEI will be happening! If you’d like to bunk in the dorms at $53 per might, those arrangements will need to be made by next Friday, May 5. If you’d like to book a room at the Franklin in, the block group rate of $165 per night can be secured until May 12th. There are a limited number of rooms at that price. An email will be sent to all registered attendees with the booking code.
In its 14th year as a joint program between the  Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) and the Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF), SEI 2107 will be held at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, from June 6-9, 2017.Read all about SEI at http://seiworkshop.org where you can find our Statement of Inclusivity, info about registering, accommodations, curriculum and much more.

SEI provides both new and more experienced professionals the opportunity to stay current in the rapidly changing fields of digitization, project management, fair use and copyright, metadata, and digital asset management, as well as significant networking opportunities. As a 2015 SEI graduate noted, “The curriculum was excellent in scope, striking a balance between detailed, practical exploration of relevant skills & tools, and putting these in the context of broader issues in visual resources/arts librarianship.”

SEI 2017 is filling up. Register soon!

Contact the SEI co-chairs Jesse Henderson or Nicole Finzer with any questions and follow us on Facebook

See you in North Carolina!

SEI 2017 Instructor of the Week: Anne Young

We’re thrilled to introduce the amazing instructors for this year’s Summer Educational Institute, many of whom are joining us for the first time! We’ll be highlighting one instructor from the 2017 curriculum each week, so be sure to stay tuned.

We’re happy to introduce Anne Young, Manager of Rights and Reproduction at the Indianapolis Museum of Art and Anne will be leading our Second Intellectual Property Module, and then will team up with Nancy Sims for “Let’s Get Practical: IP and Image Rights Case Studies.”

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Anne Young

Did you know?

Anne was the 2017 Visual Resources Association Nancy DeLaurier Award winner. Honored for her groundbreaking work editing the Rights & Reproductions: The Handbook for Cultural Institutions, the first comprehensive resource to focus solely on the rights and reproductions guidelines, established standards and emerging best practices at cultural institutions, this publication was co-published in 2015 by the Indianapolis Museum of Art and American Alliance of Museums.

Anne maintains a twitter account in which she tweets on museums, photography, reproductions, intellectual property, and more. We hope to see you at SEI to engage in what’s sure to be a great discussion and workshop!

In its 14th year as a joint program between the  Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) and the Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF), SEI 2107 will be held at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, from June 6-9, 2017.

SEI provides both new and more experienced professionals the opportunity to stay current in rapidly changing fields of digitization, project management, fair use and copyright, metadata, and digital preservation, as well as significant networking opportunities. As a 2015 SEI graduate noted, “The curriculum was excellent in scope, striking a balance between detailed, practical exploration of relevant skills & tools, and putting these in the context of broader issues in visual resources/arts librarianship.”

SEI 2017 is filling up. Register soon!sei

Contact the SEI co-chairs Jesse Henderson or Nicole Finzer with any questions and

Follow us on Facebook

See you in North Carolina!

SEI 2017 Instructor of the Week: Nancy Sims

It’s officially Spring and that means it’s time for us to highlight the amazing instructors for this year’s Summer Educational Institute (SEI), and we’ll be highlighting one instructor from the 2017 curriculum each week during the months of April and May – we hope you’ll tune in and better yet, come meet them and learn with us!

We’re happy to introduce Nancy Sims, who will be kicking off SEI with Part 1 of our Intellectual Property Module. Nancy Sims is the University of Minnesota Library’s subject specialist on copyright issues. She is both a librarian and a lawyer, has extensive experience working in academic libraries, and is fascinated by the pervasiveness of copyright issues in modern life. Nancy advocates for policies and practices that support sustainable scholarship, democratic information access, and public participation in cultural heritage collections.

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Nancy Sims

Did you know?

A veteran of SEI, she first presented at the 2015 SEI and loved it! She blew away the audience with her copyright knowledge and presentation style, and has been coming back ever since! We’re excited to welcome her back for her third year in a row and think it’s pretty cool that SEI brings people like this together, don’t you?

Nancy maintains a blog and a twitter account in which she weighs in on things large and small related to copyright, intellectual property and fair use. We hope to see you at SEI, though, where we’ll get to engage in face to face discussion with the copyright maven herself!

In its 14th year as a joint program between the  Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) and the Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF), SEI 2107 will be held at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, from June 6-9, 2017.

SEI provides new and more experienced professionals opportunities to stay current in rapidly changing fields of digitization, project management, fair use and copyright, metadata, and digital preservation, as well as significant networking opportunities — BUT — it’s filling up. Register soon!

Contact the SEI co-chairs Jesse Henderson or Nicole Finzer with any questions and follow us on Facebook!

See you in North Carolina!

Stephanie Beene
Assistant Professor, Fine Arts Librarian for Art & Architecture

Opportunity: Kress Scholarship deadline extended

The Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) and the Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF) are excited that for SEI 2017, which will be held June 6-9, 2017, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, they are able to provide the following scholarship. For more information about our instructors, curriculum, and to REGISTER, visit: https://seiworkshop.org

LOGISTICS for the APPLICATION PROCESS:

  • The Samuel H. Kress Foundation has generously agreed to sponsor six scholarships. Recipients will each receive $833 to cover tuition, accommodations, and minor incidentals.
  • Kress Scholarship applications are due by Friday, February 24, 2017.
  • Submit a resume or curriculum vita and a brief essay describing the effect attending SEI would have on their studies or their careers.
  • All applications will be evaluated by SEI co-chairs based on the criteria established for the award and any additional directions from the Kress Foundation staff. More information is also available here.
  • Submit your application materials via e-mail in a single document (PDF preferred), using the following file naming convention: LAST NAME_FIRST NAME_KRESS2017 to the SEI Co-Chairs, emails listed below.
  • Recipients will be notified no later than Friday, March 10, 2017.
  • Following the workshop, each Kress Scholarship recipient will be asked to write a report detailing how they benefitted from SEI and the scholarship.

Here’s what two attendees said about last year’s SEI:

Heather Slania, National Museum of Women in the Arts
“At SEI, I developed an informal network of people I feel like I can follow up with on any sort of project, not just digital projects, if I need help in the future.”

Luiza Wainer, MLIS Student, University of Washington
“The courses offered provided me with a greater sense of the multitude of factors a visual resources librarian needs to consider in their day-to-day activities.”

We hope to see you there!

Jesse Henderson, SEI 2017 Co-Chair (jesse.henderson@wisc.edu)
Nicole Finzer, SEI 2017 Co-Chair (n-finzer@northwestern.edu)

Visual Resources Association Foundation 2016-2017 Internship Award

Award Description

The Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF) Internship Award provides financial support for graduate students preparing for a career in visual resources and image management. The award grants $4,000 to support a period of internship in archives, libraries, museums, visual resources collections in academic institutions, or other appropriate contexts. The recipient will receive a stipend of $3,000 for 200 hours completed at the host site. A professional development component of $1,000 supports conference attendance or attendance at the Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management. The recipient will receive a one-year complimentary student membership in the Visual Resources Association.

Who May Apply

Students currently enrolled in, or having completed within the last 12 months, a graduate program in library or information science, art history, architectural history, architecture, visual or studio art, museum studies, or other applicable field of study may apply for this award. Applicants must have completed at least 10 credits of their graduate coursework before the application deadline, or demonstrate an equivalent combination of coursework and relevant experience.

Internship Description

Only one VRAF Internship is awarded per year. Priority will be given to applicants who submit projects that support art historical research and scholarship. Although the award recipient need not hold US citizenship or be a permanent resident of the US, the recipient must select an institution in the United States to act as host for the internship. This institution must be approved by the VRAF Internship Award Committee. VRAF and VRA are not responsible for matching candidates with a host institution, but will gladly assist with the process. An up to date list of host institutions can be found here.

This Internship Award will be granted for the 2016-2017 academic year. The intern is required to work on site at their chosen host institution for a minimum of 200 hours. The intern will choose to initiate their internship in the fall of 2016 or the winter or spring of 2017. The internship must begin within 30 days of the official beginning of the selected academic session of the participant’s home institution and be completed within one academic semester or two academic quarters. Exceptions are allowed by agreement between the selected intern and the VRAF Internship Awards Committee. In all cases, the internship must be completed within twelve months of the recipient being notified of the award.

The intern and the internship supervisor will complete brief evaluations of the internship experience. This report must be received by the VRAF Internship Committee by March 1, 2017.

The VRAF Internship Award will provide a stipend of $3,000 to the intern. Half of the award will be granted prior to the internship, with the remainder granted upon completion of the internship and receipt of a letter to the Chair of the VRAF Internship Committee signed by the internship supervisor and the intern stating that the 200 hours have been completed. If the recipient is not a US citizen, the VRAF is required by the IRS to withhold a percentage of this award.

A professional development component of $1,000 is available to support attendance at the national VRA conference, other appropriate conferences, or the Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management. The recipient will be reimbursed upon submission of receipts and documentation. The award recipient will be formally recognized during the Awards ceremony at the VRA conference.

The recipient will receive a one-year complimentary student membership in the Visual Resources Association.

Interns may have the option of receiving academic credit for the internship as part of their graduate course work but will be responsible for making those arrangements themselves.

How to Apply

To apply for the award, please submit the following:

  • A current resume.
  • A current transcript [this does not need to be issued directly from the institution].
  • An essay of up to 400 words addressing the applicant’s professional goals, learning expectations of the internship experience, and any skills or background that might benefit visual resources. A brief clear description of the proposed project is required.
  • The names of two professional or scholastic references with address, telephone numbers, and email addresses.
  • Host institution and contact information of internship supervisor.
  • Application materials in electronic form are preferred and should be submitted as a single PDF file to:
    Margaret Webster
    Visual Resources Consultant
    Phone: 607-257-3365
    Email: mnw3@cornell.edu

Host Institutions

Responsibility for institutional selection will remain with the award recipients rather than the VRAF. The Internship Award Committee is not responsible for matching candidates with a host institution but will gladly assist in the process. To help with this process, VRA’s Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students (VREPS) have compiled an ongoing list of institutions willing to host an intern.

Note to potential host institutions: You are invited to add your information to the VREPS Internship Award Host Sites by sending an email to Amy Lazet (alazet@COLLEGEFORCREATIVESTUDIES.EDU) with the following information: institution name, contact person, address, telephone, email, URL, and a brief description of the internship.

Deadlines for 2016-2017

  • July 31, 2016: Deadline for submission of applications to the VRAF Internship Award Committee.
  • August 21, 2016: VRAF Internship Award Committee announces the award recipient for 2016-2017.

The deadline for submission of evaluation forms and documents by the intern and the host institution will be within 30 days of the completion of the internship. The evaluation reports for a recipient who elects to complete the internship during the spring semester or quarter must be received by March 1, 2017. The remaining documents verifying the completion of the internship may be submitted later.

Monies from the Internship Award may not be used to cover indirect costs at institutions.

Additional Information

For additional information please contact the Committee Chair:
Margaret Webster
Visual Resources Consultant
Phone: 607-257-3365
Email: mnw3@cornell.edu

Full post: http://vrafoundation.org.s119319.gridserver.com/index.php/grants/internship_award

ARLIS/NA Mountain West + VRA Wild West Virtual Conference 2016: Call for Proposals

See below for the ARLIS/NA Mountain West and VRA Wild West Chapters’ Virtual Conference 2016 Call for Proposals, due August 1. Students and new professionals are encouraged to submit! And you don’t even have to be a member of ARLIS/NA or VRA to do so!


 

ARLIS/NA Mountain West + VRA Wild West

Virtual Conference 2016 Call for Proposals

DEADLINE EXTENDED!

The ARLIS/NA Mountain West Chapter and The Wild West Chapter of VRA are teaming up to bring you a virtual conference in 2016. We would like to cordially invite you to submit proposals for the Virtual Conference 2016. With an extended deadline we also have decided to broaden the scope. Please feel free to submit a proposal for any project you have completed or that is a work-in-progress. The only criteria we ask proposals be limited to is work within the arts.

The extended proposal deadline is Monday, August 1.

Based on the success of the Mountain West Chapter’s new virtual conference format, we are eager to use the virtual format again. Similar to the last virtual conference, we need a diverse set of presenters. If you have an interesting project that you are currently working on or recently finished, please consider submitting a proposal to present it to your peers. Please note, this call for proposals is open to any; not only members of VRA and ARLIS.

Perhaps you had a proposal turned down for the ARLIS/NA national conference. Here is another opportunity to share it!

Here are the details:

  • Presenters will have their talks prerecorded by a member of our chapter and posted to a private site online.
  • A live Q&A session will happen in December with all the presenters.
  • Conference attendees will be given access to the site and will be able to watch all the presentations at their leisure.
  • Each talk will be accompanied by a discussion board for questions and comments.
  • Sessions will be recorded in late October and posted in November.
  • Each person will have a set amount of time to take and answer questions.
  • This session will be moderated by a member of the Mountain West chapter.
  • The Q&A Session will be recorded and posted to the site if attendees are unable to watch in real time.

Requirements:

1. Proposals need to be focused on the arts but the can include just about any subtopic.

2. Presentations should be limited to 20 minutes.

3. Presenter will work to find a time to record their presentation with a designated member of the Mountain West chapter.

4. Presenter must be available for a live, virtual Q&A session on December 2.

5. Each presenter will be asked to take questions for 10 to 15 minutes.

Click here to submit your proposal online: http://goo.gl/forms/SLbVY4S6oM

Please contact John Burns (burns at dixie dot edu) with any questions.

SEI 2016: Kress Scholarship Announcement

The Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) and the Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF) are pleased to announce the Samuel H. Kress Foundation Scholarships for the 2016 Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management (SEI).

The Samuel H. Kress Foundation, has generously agreed to increase its support this year, sponsoring six scholarships for SEI 2016, which will be held June 7-10, 2016, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This intensive workshop is designed to serve a wide range of professionals eager to learn about new technologies and update job skills: museum staff, VR curators, librarians, archivists, and all those managing digital image media. It will feature a curriculum addresses the requirements of today’s information professional, including hands-on and lecture modules presented by expert instructors. SEI provides new professionals, current library school students and more experienced staff the opportunity to stay current in a rapidly changing field, as well as significant networking opportunities.

The six Kress Scholarship recipients will each receive $833 to cover tuition, accommodations, and minor incidentals. Kress Scholarship applications are due by Friday, February 12, 2016. Recipients will be notified no later than Friday, March 11, 2016. Following the workshop, each Kress Scholarship recipient will be asked to write a report detailing how they benefitted from SEI and the scholarship.

Applicants for the 2016 Kress Scholarship should submit a resume or curriculum vita and a brief essay describing the effect attending SEI would have on their studies or their careers. All applications will be evaluated by SEI co-chairs based on the criteria established for the award and any additional directions from the Kress Foundation staff. More information is also available on the website. Submit your application materials via e-mail in a single document (PDF preferred), using the following file naming convention: LAST NAME_FIRST NAME_KRESS2016

Please e-mail your application to SEI Co-Chair Greta Bahnemann at: bahne002@umn.edu

SEI registration will open in January 2016.

Hack Your MLIS Program: Visual Resources Librarianship

Hi Arlisnappers! After a yearlong absence, I am back on the blog as a feature post writer and excited to be a part of the ArLiSNAP team once again. I recently graduated with my MLIS and I currently work as the Director of Visual Resources at the University of Georgia.

In April 2014, I shared my tips for hacking your MLIS program to focus on art librarianship. Now I’m back with a better-late-than-never follow-up on how I hacked my MLIS program to prepare for my career in visual resources librarianship. We have discussed how to plan your coursework so you are prepared to manage digital collections before, and this post will focus specifically on what you need to manage visual resources collections.

Visual Resources Center, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia. Image courtesy of Courtney Baron.

Visual Resources Center, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia. Image courtesy of Courtney Baron.

What is visual resources librarianship?

Visual resources librarianship is a bit different from art librarianship, though the two fields require similar skills and educational backgrounds. I have worked as a full-time visual resources professional for one year now, so I have a good idea of what the profession involves and what is required to do the job successfully. That being said, each position is unique depending on the needs of the institution. Visual resources professionals historically functioned as slide librarians, usually in art/art history departments or libraries. Now, we primarily manage digital image collections, though slide collections still exist at many institutions, and assist faculty and students with their image needs. We may also manage public visual resources spaces that range from digital scanning and projects labs to libraries with circulating materials.

Become involved in VRA

The Visual Resources Association (VRA) is smaller than ARLIS, but equally as welcoming. Hands down, this is the best way to get – and stay – connected to the field, especially if you are one of the few people in your program interested in art and visual resources librarianship. Not only do you have access to a large network of art and visual resources professionals, but you can also follow news, concerns, and trends on the VRA listserv. I encourage you to be active on the listserv as well since name recognition can help you in your job search later on! Seriously – my predecessor was very active, and I get asked about him all the time. If you have been involved with ARLIS but haven’t yet ventured into VRA, there is a joint conference next year in Seattle, WA, so it will be an opportune time to check out both organizations and annual conferences. There is also a similar group to ArLiSNAP called vreps – visual resources association emerging professionals and students – that you should join. The VRA Bulletin is the journal of the association and each issue contains a wealth of information about current issues and practices in the field.

Focus coursework and projects on visual resources topics

As I said in part one, the best way to ensure you are getting a similar education to a MLIS program that does offer an art librarianship track is to see which courses they require and which electives they offer. I also recommend looking at similar tracks, such as digital content/asset management or archives. I recommend courses on the following topics, since they relate to visual resources: humanities information services, digital libraries, descriptive cataloging and metadata, database design, digital humanities, and digital archives. Basically, looks for classes that focus on metadata, technologies, databases, and managing or curating digital archives, libraries, and other collections. These classes will give you an overview of the information you need and you can focus your projects and papers specifically on arts and humanities topics.

Independent study

In part one, I discussed an independent study on art and visual resources librarianship that I designed as an elective in my MLIS program. If you would like more information on that, I’m happy to share my syllabus and course projects in a later post.

This time, I’m focusing on what you can do independently outside of coursework to build some of the skills you need to work in visual resources.

Photography, Photoshop, and Lightroom 

Knowledge of photography, especially editing software, is very helpful for managing image collections. I still have a lot to learn about photography, but I have heard that ShootFlyShoot has fantastic photography classes. Why is this important? So you understand how the images you work with are produced, and you can produce images if required. Some visual resources positions require original photography of works of art, either from works in museum or galleries, or from faculty and student work. I do not produce original photography in my current position, but I do a lot of scanning, and knowledge of photographic editing techniques is essential. I use Adobe Photoshop, and recommend Photoshop Classroom in a Book to learn the basics of using Photoshop. The book has a disc with tutorials and sample images to practice editing. Adobe Lightroom is a simpler and easier way to edit images and is preferred over Photoshop by some visual resources professionals.

Metadata

Just like a library book would be lost without a catalog record, images would be lost without good metadata. I believe that metadata is perhaps the most important part of managing image collections. After all, what’s the point of having a collection if your content cannot be easily found? Just as there are cataloging standards and formats for cataloging books, archival materials, etc., these also exist for visual resources collections. Cataloging Cultural Objects (CCO) is a content standard for visual resources collections (comparable to RDA) and VRA Core is a metadata schema used to describe images (comparable to MARC). If you have access to Adobe Bridge, you can download the VRA Core panel and practice creating metadata for images. It’s also essential to be familiar with the Getty vocabularies, which are now available as Linked Open Data. The vocabularies will give you the structured terminology for art, architecture, and other materials and are essential tools for the proper cataloging of images.

Image resources

Working in visual resources doesn’t just mean managing image collections. There is a reference and instruction component. You must be able to help others find and locate images using subscription databases, institutional image collections, and free resources on the web. The most popular subscription database for images is Artstor Digital Library. If the institution where you attend school or work does not have a subscription, you can still check out the website or YouTube videos to learn more about how the database works and how to use it. There is a section with free guides, including subject-specific guides, and studying these is an excellent way to increase your knowledge of this resource.

Visual resources professionals manage institutional image collections or archives. These collections can include images from faculty and student image requests, images from digitized slides, images purchased from vendors, and images related to institutional history. In order to properly manage these image collections, you need to know how digital asset management systems work. A broad knowledge of DAMs is important, because there are many different systems out there. The most popular DAMs for visual resources include Artstor’s Shared Shelf, Luna Imaging, and Madison Digital Image Database (MDID). These can be high cost for some institutions, so in-house solutions are also popular.

You also need to know how to locate high-quality and accurate images on the web. Libguides are an excellent way to compile these resources, and many institutions have great libguides on locating images for you to browse and study. My personal philosophy behind libguides, or curating image resources in general, is this: quality over quantity. Your job isn’t to know all instances of where to find images of the Mona Lisa. Your job is to know where to find the best images of the Mona Lisa.

Copyright and fair use

You also need to know how the images you manage, or how images available in subscription databases or on the web, can be used. This is why copyright and fair use comes into play. For general information on copyright law, look at Copyright Law for Librarians and Educators: Creative Strategies and Practical Solutions. For copyright information related to the visual arts, your best resources are from the College Art Association. Copyright, Permissions, and Fair Use among Visual Artists and the Academic and Museum Visual Arts Communities was released in 2014 and and the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts was released earlier this year. Study these documents and know them well.

Get experience – if you can

Some institutions don’t have a visual resources collection, but those that do usually need help. Don’t hesitate to reach out to a visual resources professional and ask if you can volunteer, intern, or even just visit the collection and learn more about what they do and what a typical day is like for them.

So this is what I recommend doing as a library science student if you are interested in visual resources. If other visual resources professionals are reading this, I’m curious to hear what you also recommend!

Considering SEI? Take a Look at What Others Have to Say

Registration for the ARLIS/NA & VRAF Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management closes at the end of the month. If you haven’t signed up already then hurry to reserve your spot! You can register here.  Not sure how this workshop will benefit you and your career? Then check out a post from Ashley Peterson about her experience at SEI last year. You can find even more testimonials on the SEI workshop website.

Here are just some of the comments:

The SEI coursework proved to be exactly what I needed: the perfect balance of theoretical framework, practical application, and open communication between like-minded individuals.”

I am looking forward to attending SEI again, in order to refresh my knowledge with the most up-to-date information about all the subjects covered by SEI: cataloguing, image editing, transitioning skills, project planning, strategic planning, new social media platforms and applications, and intellectual property concerns.”

If you are interested in attending this year (or in the future), check out the SEI Facebook page for more information.

We would love to hear from you about your own experiences. How has SEI has benefited you? Feel free to share your story in the comments below.

SEI Registration Reminder

Places are still available for the 2015 Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management (SEI ), to be held June 9-12 at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. http://seiworkshop.org/

This intensive workshop features a curriculum addressing the latest requirements of today’s visual resources and image management professionals. This year’s topics and experienced instructors include:

  • Intellectual property rights: Nancy Sims (Copyright Program Librarian, University of Minnesota)
  • Metadata overview: Gretchen Gueguen (Data Services Coordinator, Digital Public Library of America)
  • Embedded metadata: Greg Reser (Metadata Specialist, University of California, San Diego Library)
  • Digital life-cycle: Liz Gushee (Digital Collections Librarian, Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin)
  • Digital preservation: Nicole Finzer (Visual Resources Librarian, Digital Collections Dept, Northwestern University)
  • Project management: Angela Waarala (Digital Collections Project Manager, University of Illinois Library), Nicole Finzer, Liz Gushee
  • Digital humanities: Jeannine Keefer (Visual Resources Librarian, University of Richmond)

SEI is suited to information professionals new to the field and more experienced professionals eager to respond to fast-changing technological advancements and job requirements. Recent attendees said they definitely would recommend SEI to others: “Good experience and a great way to interact with others doing what I do.” Another wrote ”SEI showed me the range of roles in the field, including what I might encounter in a different position.”

Discounted registration for members of VRA or ARLIS/NA is $595.

Like SEI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SummerEducationalInstitute?ref=hl