Category Archives: ARLIS/NA Annual Conference

Suggested Schedules for the ARLIS/NA 2022 Annual Conference

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

The ARLIS/NA 2022 Annual Conference this year marks the society’s Golden Anniversary in Chicago. In addition to honoring this milestone with a marquee panel on the early years of the organization on Wednesday afternoon, the conference will feature many invaluable discussions, panels, meetings, and speaker sessions for every information science professional. 

We have created suggested conference schedules for three types of information professionals in the field as a way to guide those attending! Note that all of the suggested events are subject-specific and do not include general events, although those are greatly suggested for anyone interested regardless of the profession such as First-time attendee meetings, DEIA events, and happy hours! 

Additionally, you can find the schedules of our co-moderators, Chaun Campos and Jessica Craig at the end of this post for more inspiration on how to plan your day at the conference. As new professionals, Chaun and Jessica are both planning to attend the ArLiSNAP Professional Websites Workshop and ArLiSNAP Happy Hour, along with other sessions that align with their new professional interests.

Note that tours and workshops that require an additional fee are specified, and advance registration is required before March 29, 2022, for these tours and workshops. The registration link for all tours/workshops can be found here.

Suggested schedule for an Academic Librarian:

Apr 5, 2022

8:00 am: Workshop: Subject Guides in the Digital Age: A Workshop on Curating the Most Relevant, Inclusive, and Current Resources ($15)

10:00 am: Workshop: Putting the Framework for Visual Literacy in Higher Education into Practice: An Interactive Workshop ($15)

11:00 am: Tour: School of the Art Institute of Chicago’s Fashion Resource Center + Textile Resource Center School of the Art Institute of Chicago ($10)

1:00 pm: Workshop: Creating Radical Hope: Artistic and Speculative Library Responses to Climate Change ($15)

April 6, 2022

8:30 am: Creative Collections: Artist Archives in Academic Libraries

12:45 pm: “Who Were We? Where Did We Go? Voices from the Early Years of the Society” 

3:45 pm: Innovative Instructions: Strategies and Opportunities for Unique Instructional Needs 

April 7, 2022

8:30 am: Beyond the Classroom: Developing Image Databases for Research 

10:15 am: Visioning the (im)possible: experiences of librarian-caregivers during the pandemic and strategies for the future of library work

12:00 pm: OCLC Research Library Partnership Roundtable

2:15 pm: Centering Digital Accessibility: Projects at Academic and Art & Design School Libraries 

Apr 8, 2022

8:30 am: Envisioning Libraries Through Feminist and Creative Practices 

10:30 am: Confronting the Myth of Neutrality: Addressing Bias and Inclusion in Cataloging and Classification in Art Libraries

3:00 pm: Points of Connection: Using Wikidata for Art Information 


Suggested schedule for a Gallery Archivist

Apr 5, 2022

10:30 am: Tour: Oriental Institute Museum Hyde Park ($10)

11:00 am: Workshop: Single Picture Books Latitude Chicago ($45)

April 6, 2022

8:30 am: Creative Collections: Artist Archives in Academic Libraries

12:45 pm: “Who Were We? Where Did We Go? Voices from the Early Years of the Society” 

2:30 pm: Know Their Names: Case Studies in DEIA Collection Assessment, Expansion, and Access

3:45 pm: The Impact of COVID-19 on Professional Development: A Conversation on the Past, Present, and Future for Academic Arts Librarians 

April 7, 2022

8:30 am: Art-chiving the Web: Collaborative Collection Development and Preservation for Art History Web Resources

10:15 am: Evaluating, Optimizing, and Remediating Physical Accessibility in Library Spaces 

12:00 pm: OCLC Research Library Partnership Roundtable

2:15 pm: Imagination, Collaboration, and the Social Production of Knowledge 

Apr 8, 2022

8:30 am: Words Make Art: Engaging Diverse Communities Through Artists’ Books 

10:30 am: Awakening Arts Library Collections to DEIA: Responsive Acquisition Strategies for Addressing Bias 

3:00 pm: Points of Connection: Using Wikidata for Art Information 


Suggested Schedule for a Digital Preservation Specialist 

Apr 5, 2022

8:00 am: Workshop: Subject Guides in the Digital Age: A Workshop on Curating the Most Relevant, Inclusive, and Current Resources  ($15)

11:00 am: Workshop: Single Picture Books Latitude Chicago ($45)

April 6, 2022

8:30 am: Preserving Photographic Glass Plates: Conservation and Access in the Digital Age 

12:45 pm: “Who Were We? Where Did We Go? Voices from the Early Years of the Society” 

2:30 pm: Digital Humanities & Open Educational Resources in the Arts Roundtable 

3:45 pm: Letting users guide the way: a framework for user-centered design 

April 7, 2022

8:30 am: Beyond the Classroom: Developing Image Databases for Research 

10:15 am: Programmatic Information Literacy Instruction in Art and Design Libraries 

12:00 pm: OCLC Research Library Partnership RoundtableDennis Massie 

2:15 pm: Centering Digital Accessibility: Projects at Academic and Art & Design School Libraries

Apr 8, 2022

8:30 am: Visual Literacy In and Beyond the Classroom 

10:30 am: Beyond the Textual: Visual Information Systems that Help and Hinder

3:00 pm: Digital Tools and New Trends: Using Technology and Innovative Solutions to (Re)Establish Value in Images and Image Collections 


If you attend the conference, please consider writing a blog post for us relaying your experience and what you learned! Send an email to arlisnap.na@gmail.com expressing your interest.

APPLICATIONS EXTENDED: Student Diversity Award for Conference Attendance

The Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) Travel Awards Subcommittee is accepting applications for the ARLIS/NA Conference Attendance and Travel Awards to support attendance at the ARLIS/NA 50th annual conference in Chicago, IL on April 5-9, 2022. The application deadline for the Student Diversity Award for Conference Attendance has been extended. Applications are now due by January 28, 2022.

Applicants may apply through this form.

Full details below. Please get in touch with Travel Awards Subcommittee chair, Courtney Stine, at clbaro01@louisville.edu if you have any questions.

Open to All Eligible Applicants: This award is open to all eligible applicants (including non-ARLIS members)

Student Diversity Award for Conference Attendance (1 award/$1000)

Eligibility: Students from a traditionally under-represented group who are currently enrolled in an accredited graduate program in Library Studies and/or Information Studies or have recently graduated (within 12 mos. of graduation). To be considered for the award, applicants must meet the following criteria:

· Be enrolled as a graduate student in Library Studies or Information Studies or recently graduated (within 12 mos. of graduation)

· Be one of the following:

  • U.S. resident and a member of a racial/ethnic group as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau: African American/Black; Latino/Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, or American Indian/Alaska Native or
  • Canadian resident and of aboriginal identity, as defined in the Canadian Employment Equity Act (“aboriginal peoples” means persons who are Indians, Inuit, or Métis) or
  • Canadian resident and a member of a visible minority, as defined by the Canadian Employment Equity Act (members of “visible minorities” means persons, other than aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour)

· Be interested in career in art librarianship/visual resources

A mentor from the ARLIS/NA Diversity Committee, who will facilitate the recipient’s attendance at the Conference, will be assigned to the recipient of the award prior to the Conference. The recipient will write a brief post-conference report evaluating their conference experience.

Purpose: To encourage multicultural students considering a career in art librarianship or visual resources to participate in the activities of ARLIS/NA.

The recipient will write a brief post-conference report evaluating their conference experience.

Full link to application form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeHKGsvQO_D2k3i5c9zfgYeAgyeirUUUq3yOo6taFJA6igoVg/viewform

Scholarship Opportunities: ARLIS/NA Conference Attendance and Travel Awards

The Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) Travel Awards Subcommittee is now accepting applications for the ARLIS/NA Conference Attendance and Travel Awards to support attendance at the ARLIS/NA 50th annual conference in Chicago, IL on April 5-9, 2022. Applications are due by January 7, 2022 through this form.

Full details below. Please get in touch with Travel Awards Subcommittee chair, Courtney Stine, at clbaro01@louisville.edu if you have any questions.

Awards Open to Current ARLIS Members

Conference Attendance Award (1 award/$1000)

Eligibility: Individual member who serves as a committee member, group moderator, and/or chapter officer. Purpose: To encourage participation in ARLIS/NA by assisting conference attendance by committee members, chapter officers, and moderators, of divisions, sections, and round tables.

The recipient will write a brief post-conference report evaluating their conference experience.

Student Conference Attendance Award (1 award/$1000)

Eligibility: Student members who are active participants in ARLIS/NA and are currently enrolled in an accredited graduate program in Library Studies and/or Information Studies or have recently graduated (within 12 mos. of graduation). Purpose: To encourage participation in ARLIS/NA by assisting students considering a career in art librarianship or visual resources to attend the annual ARLIS/NA conference.

The recipient will write a brief post-conference report evaluating their conference experience.

Awards Open to All Eligible Applicants

Student Diversity Award for Conference Attendance (1 award/$1000)

Eligibility: Students from a traditionally under-represented group who are currently enrolled in an accredited graduate program in Library Studies and/or Information Studies or have recently graduated (within 12 mos. of graduation). To be considered for the award, applicants must meet the following criteria:

· Be enrolled as a graduate student in Library Studies or Information Studies or recently graduated (within 12 mos. of graduation)

· Be one of the following:

  • U.S. resident and a member of a racial/ethnic group as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau: African American/Black; Latino/Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, or American Indian/Alaska Native or
  • Canadian resident and of aboriginal identity, as defined in the Canadian Employment Equity Act (“aboriginal peoples” means persons who are Indians, Inuit, or Métis) or
  • Canadian resident and a member of a visible minority, as defined by the Canadian Employment Equity Act (members of “visible minorities” means persons, other than aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour)

· Be interested in career in art librarianship/visual resources

A mentor from the ARLIS/NA Diversity Committee, who will facilitate the recipient’s attendance at the Conference, will be assigned to the recipient of the award prior to the Conference. The recipient will write a brief post-conference report evaluating their conference experience.

Purpose: To encourage multicultural students considering a career in art librarianship or visual resources to participate in the activities of ARLIS/NA.

Howard Karno Award (1 award/$1000)

Eligibility: Art librarians residing in Latin America or Art Librarians residing in North America working with significant Latin American art/architecture research collections or researching subjects or themes related to Latin American art/architecture. Purpose: To encourage professional development of art librarians who work to advance the study of Latin American art through interaction with ARLIS/NA colleagues and conference participation.

The recipient will write a brief post-conference report evaluating their conference experience.

Judith A. Hoffberg Student Award for Conference Attendance (1 award/$1000)

Sponsored by the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) the Judith A. Hoffberg Student Award for Conference Attendance is given annually in honor of the founding of ARLIS/NA and its first president. The Art Libraries Society of North America was founded in 1972 by a group of art librarians attending the American Library Association annual conference in Chicago at the initiative of Judith Hoffberg. Eligibility: Students who are currently enrolled in an accredited graduate program in Library Studies and/or Information Studies or have recently graduated (within 12 mos. of graduation). Purpose: To encourage students considering a career in art librarianship or visual resources to participate in the activities of ARLIS/NA.

The recipient will write a brief post-conference report evaluating their conference experience.

Deliberations are expected to be complete by January 28, 2022.

Call for Conference Session Proposals – ARLIS/NA 50th annual conference, Past Present Future: Aspiring to New Heights – Chicago (deadline 9/7)

The Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) will hold its 50th annual conference, Past Present Future: Aspiring to New Heights in Chicago, IL, April 5th to 9th, 2022. 

As the Art Libraries Society of North America celebrates its golden anniversary, the conference theme underscores the history of art librarianship, focuses on the current emergence of new technologies and modes of interaction, and provides an opportunity to consider how the events of the past two years may impact the future. It also reflects Chicago’s own story, from the resiliency and optimism that allowed Chicago to reinvent itself as a modern city after the Great Fire, to its development as a city of dynamic diversity where issues of equity, inclusion, accessibility and anti-racism are of paramount importance.

The Chicago Conference Program Committee invites fellow librarians and library professionals, archivists, curators, museum professionals, publishers, educators, artists, designers, architects, and scholars to propose papers, sessions, workshops, and speakers that reflect reinvention and the aspiration to reach new heights.

The 2021 conference survey revealed that attendees were most interested in the following topics, listed in ranked order. The program committee encourages submissions that include, but are not limited to: Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility, Local Art and Architecture, Advocacy, Social Justice, Public Policy and Activism, Archives, Rare Books and Special Collections, Collection Development and Management, Critical Librarianship, Digital Humanities and Digital Scholarship, Alternative Publications, Artists’ Books, Graphic Novels, ‘zines etc. Teaching and Pedagogical Practice, Visual Literacy, User Experience

Types of Submissions:
PAPERS: An individual paper presentation, potentially addressing new research, a case study, or an innovative idea with a total time of 15-20 minutes. Presentations provide attendees with new tools, strategies, or inspiration that they can apply in their own practice. The Conference Program Co-Chairs and the Conference Program Committee will group individual presentations into paper panels with a common topic or theme, which will run from 60 to 90 minutes, including a Q&A.

PRE-COORDINATED PANELS: A pre-coordinated session of 2-5 presenters with a moderator addressing a common topic or theme with a total time of 60-90 minutes, including a Q&A. Panels provide attendees with multiple views/strategies on a single topical area, a comparison of tools or methods, or a number of case studies on related topics. It is not necessary to identify all potential presenters before submitting. Naming a moderator, who will advocate for and develop the session, is required.

SPEAKER SUGGESTIONS & PLENARIES: A plenary may be a prepared paper or discussion panel of significant importance to the profession. Plenaries are 60-90 minutes in length. No other meetings, sessions, etc. are scheduled during plenaries. The content of plenaries should be current and of broad interest to attendees. Non-member speakers who will speak on a significant topic of interest to ARLIS/NA members may be suggested here.

WORKSHOPS: An opportunity to teach and explore current and emerging topics in an intimate atmosphere. Workshops encourage a focused, hands-on experience led by experts who combine presentation, active learning, collaboration, and discussions. They may last two, four, or eight hours. Consider ways to benefit from local educational or cultural institutions in Chicago.
Additional Details
WORD LIMIT: All proposal abstracts are limited to 500 words or fewer.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: You’ll be asked to list 2-3 learning objectives, takeaways, or goals for your proposal.

TOPICS: You’ll be asked to select up to 5 topics relevant to your session.

AUDIENCES: You’ll be asked to pick up to 5 target audiences for your session.

NEW VOICES: You will be asked if you are a student or in your first five years of librarianship as you may be eligible for the New Voices in the Profession session.

DEIA-AR: You will be asked if your presentation addresses issues of diversity, equity, inclusion, accessibility or anti-racism. The committee is particularly interested in seeing papers and sessions that include attention to DEIA-AR.

How to Submit Proposals

You must anonymize your proposal description. All personal or institutional names must be removed from the description and learning objectives (however, these details must remain in other fields of the form), and may be replaced by terms such as “presenter,” “author,” or “speaker”, or in the case of institutions, terms such as “large academic library,” “small museum library,” etc. The review of proposals is a blind peer review process. Non-anonymized proposals may be ineligible.

Submit your presentation, panel, and workshop proposals via the button below: 
Submit your proposal here
The deadline is Tuesday, September 7th, 2021
The call for posters, roundtables, moderators, and other meeting proposals will be announced later this year.

Please direct any questions to the Program Co-chairs:
Cara List, Northwestern University cara.list@northwestern.edu
Jamie Vander Broek, University of Michigan jlausch@umich.edu

ARLIS/NA Conference Support Tips: Self-Care

The 49th ARLIS/NA Virtual Annual Conference begins tomorrow! While we are all very excited for every speaker, event, session, and panel, it is important to maintain your wellness so you can take advantage of all the conference has to offer. In the below tips, we offer ideas on how to avoid potential mental, physical, and emotional burn-out from an all-day conference.

  • Stretch often! Set a timer for every 45 min, and try to get up and move when it goes off! Check out these helpful desk stretches here
  • If you don’t have allergies, keeping peppermint essential oil nearby is a great pick me up!
  • Take breaks to pet your pets. If you have no pets, take breaks to look at photos of other people’s pets!
  • Drink plenty of water and make sure to keep snacks handy! Even at a virtual conference, it’s easy to get sucked into the content and forget to give your body the nutrients it needs to focus and thrive.
  • Plan your day in advance by creating an agenda to balance your work/school and conference sessions; if you have limited time, prioritize the sessions you think you will learn the most from.
  • Keep a virtual note-taking document nearby so you can quickly copy and paste resources that are shared in the webinar chats!
  • Create a comfortable workstation from which to attend the conference.
  • If you are prone to headaches, be sure to take a rest from your computer screen during the conference breaks.

Have some helpful tips of your own? Share them with us at arlisnap.na@gmail.com!

2021 Conference Guides and Newer Attendees Call for Participation

La version française suit.

The Montreal conference planning team will pair interested Newer Attendees with volunteer Conference Guides at the 2021 Virtual Conference. Interested in participating? Click the sign-up link at the bottom of this email.

The annual conference is a time to renew relationships and forge new connections. This year’s pivot into the virtual environment opens up the exciting possibility of networking with a larger pool of participants across locations. 

We have an even greater incentive to use the Conference Guides Program to bridge social distances and help all attendees make meaningful, collegial connections.  


Newer Attendees (those with 0-3 years of ARLIS/NA conference experience, no matter their professional level) will be paired with more experienced conference goers (4+ years conference experience), who act as their guides during the conference. Conference Guides arrange to meet their Newer Attendee at the start of the conference, check in with them along the way, introduce them to colleagues, and help them to get the most from the experience!

Participating doesn’t take much time and is limited to the duration of the conference. A tip sheet will be made available to Conference Guides, and a liaison will be at the ready to answer questions. 

If you are interested in participating as a Newer Attendee or Conference Guide, please use this form to sign-up by Wednesday, May 5, 2021. Questions? Contact Erin Rutherford erin.rutherford@ncdcr.gov

— 

Appel à participation pour les guides de la conférence 2021 et les nouveaux participants 

L’équipe de planification de la conférence de Montréal souhaite jumeler les nouveaux participants intéressés avec des bénévoles qui pourront les guider lors de la conférence virtuelle de 2021. Vous souhaitez participer ? Cliquez sur le lien d’inscription au bas de ce courriel. 

La conférence annuelle est l’occasion de renouer des liens et d’en forger de nouveaux. Cette année, le passage à l’environnement virtuel offre la possibilité de nouer des liens avec un plus grand nombre de participants dans différents lieux.  

Nous avons plus que jamais intérêt à utiliser le programme des guides de conférence pour combler les distances sociales et pour aider tous les participants à établir des liens significatifs et collégiaux.  

Les nouveaux participants (ceux qui ont 3 ans d’expérience ou moins des conférences ARLIS/NA, quel que soit leur niveau professionnel) seront jumelés avec des participants expérimentés (4 ans ou plus d’expérience des conférences), qui leur serviront de guides pendant la conférence. Les guides de conférence rencontrent leur nouveau participant au début de la conférence, prennent de ses nouvelles en cours de route, le présentent à ses collègues et l’aident à tirer le meilleur parti de son expérience! 

Participer ne prend pas beaucoup de temps et se limite à la durée de la conférence. Une fiche de conseils sera mise à la disposition des guides de la conférence, et un agent de liaison sera prêt à répondre aux questions.  

Si vous souhaitez participer en tant que nouveau participant ou guide de conférence, veuillez utiliser ce formulaire pour vous inscrire avant le mercredi 5 mai 2021. Vous avez des questions? Contactez Erin Rutherford erin.rutherford@ncdcr.gov.  

Diary of an early career art librarian: Bullet journaling and the mediation of past, present, and future

Hi ArLiSNAPpers! I presented a poster at this year’s national ARLIS/NA conference titled “Diary of an early career art librarian: Bullet journaling and the mediation of past, present, and future”. Since the topic obviously has a lot to do with the conversations we’re having at ArLiSNAP, and because I know a lot of us can’t get to national conferences, I thought I’d adapt the poster for the blog! So to introduce the project I should mention that in the last year or so I’ve started bullet journaling (maybe obvious) and had a lot of colleagues ask me about it—how it works generally, how it works for me specifically, what kind of pens I like to use, etc.—and in the process of talking them through my bullet journal I ended up just talking about what my life has been like since making the leap from student to new professional. I proposed this poster with the intention of trying to understand (mostly for myself) why that kept happening, and to bridge my penchant for philosophizing with the desire to provide some practical pointers.

When I graduated from library school in 2017, I finished my last semester of part time student work and supplemented my income with on-call and part time “official” librarian work. And I felt lucky—I was lucky, in fact, to get great experience, to get any job in a competitive job market in one of the most expensive cities in North America, to work with librarians I admire, and to observe a variety of library settings.

But it was difficult, too—bussing across town sometimes five times a day posed difficulties for my health, it left little time to keep trying to find full time work, and maybe most importantly, even though it required the degree, it never really felt like Librarianship™. During those months, I carried my yellow legal pad with me because it held a cheat sheet to help me juggle the policy idiosyncrasies of my various workplaces, and because I could sit down for the day, create my to do list for the next 2-4 hours and feel satisfied when I could leave with each task, handed to me from a “Real Librarian”, off my list.

With the end of my temp positions looming, I was offered my current permanent, full time job. Six months later, I offered the following nugget of wisdom to twitter:

screenshot with a tweet from the author that reads “Would it be weird and unacademic to propose a poster with tips and suggested sections/chapters for a librarian’s bullet journal? Because, like, that has been my biggest breakthrough in the last six months #AskingForAFriend”

And unlike most things I write on twitter, I actually gave the second part of this some thought. Because it’s true, there had been a lot of milestones (and continue to be a lot), but in terms of my professional identity, my workload, my confidence level (while constantly in flux)—all of those changes were shaped a drastically altered relationship to and understanding of time.

What do I need to do in the next 30 minutes? That’s a nice idea, but it’ll take years of relationship building to realize it. How do I pace myself to teach a three hour Foundations class? What was that thing Acquisitions said about DDA six months ago? They’re replacing the furniture on that floor now, maybe in two years I can get new chairs… I should write that down, I don’t want to forget it in the next hour/month/year/5 years. 

This constant sense of juggling multiple timelines, of acting and reacting in the present, trying to plan while accepting an unpredictable future, considering the implications of the past organizationally and personally…that is the kernel of transitioning from “student” to “professional”.

So what does this have to do with bullet journaling?

Well, this evolution from precarious to permanent, from chronos to kairos, from student to new professional—it lies in the physical and intellectual distinction between a yellow legal pad to a bullet journal. Because bullet journaling requires you to take something abstract like time, and to then construct some of kind of organization system in a tangible space. Not the arbitrary way of organizing time that a pre-designed planner foists upon you, but a way that requires thought, reflection, and creativity. And that’s a good place to start.

Click here to download the zine I made to accompany the poster, or flip through it below!

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Report Back from ARLIS/NA 2019: Two First-Timers Share Their Thoughts

Greetings ArLiSNAP-ers! Many of us volunteers are back at work after attending the ARLIS/NA Annual Conference in Salt Lake City, UT. A few of us were first-timers, and Courtney and Autumn got to thinking that some reflections might be useful or interesting to those students or new professionals who haven’t had the chance to attend yet.

Courtney Hunt is Art & Design Librarian and Assistant Professor at The Ohio State University. An early career librarian, Courtney graduated with her M.S.I.S from University of Tennessee at Knoxville in 2017 and an M.A. in History of Art & Architecture from Hunter College-CUNY in 2013. She is a feature post writer for ArLiSNAP.

Autumn Wetli is Consultation Coordinator at the University of Michigan Libraries. She is newly graduated (2018) with her M.L.I.S. from Wayne State University and is a feature post writer for ArLiSNAP.

View of the mountains from The Grand America Hotel.

Photo by Courtney Hunt. View from one of the meeting room terraces at The Grand America Hotel, Salt Lake City, UT.

First up, Autumn asks Courtney a few questions about her time at ARLIS/NA 2019:
This question is pretty generic, but I’m curious! What was your favorite part of ARLIS/NA?

My favorite part of ARLIS/NA this year was meeting like-minded people who empathize with the challenges of my particular job. I work as a solo librarian at the Fine Arts Library at The Ohio State University, which is a branch library. In addition to me, the librarian, there is a full-time staff member who has been with the institution for 25 years (who is great), as well as student workers, but I don’t always get to chat with others doing liaison or collection work during my day-to-day. And even when I do, many of my colleagues have a very different focus in their position, even though much of our work overlaps. It was really really really great to connect with people whose jobs and subject expertise parallel what I do. I also really enjoyed the reception at the Natural History Museum of Utah (wine, hello). I also liked your poster on DIY publishing and Riot Grrrl ;) .

What inspired you at conference? Is there anything you’re excited bring back to your own library or work?

I was really inspired by the last session of the conference I went to, which was the SIG meeting for the Critical Librarianship Special Interest Group. Jenny Ferretti and Andrew Wang did an amazing job facilitating crucial conversations we all should be having. I was in a breakout group about crit lib and library spaces, and we had a really wonderful conversation about being “space ambassadors” and what that could mean. It inspired me to take a close look at the space I steward and come up with ideas to make it welcoming, inclusive, and safe for everyone.

I was also really inspired by the session on teaching with artist(‘s, s?-inside joke from the session…which is it??) books. We have a small collection of artists books at my library, as well as a pretty big one across the oval in our Rare Books and Manuscripts Library, and instructors are really eager to share those with students–to let them know they’re there. I wanted ideas for how to teach with them, and I got them! So I’m really excited to bring that back to my own library.

Powerpoint Slide of Natural History Museum of Utah.

Photo by Courtney Hunt. A Slide from Natural History Museum of History Executive Director Sarah George’s lecture on the architecture of the museum.

How did you get involved, interact, collaborate with your colleagues at this conference?

Well, I volunteer for ArLiSNAP, first off, so I had a built-in community of people that I was regularly meeting up with semi-spontaneously. That was cool. The way I got involved with ArLiSNAP was to email the  group when there was an open position (which we have several of RIGHT NOW). Breanne got back to me really quickly, and I was in! I want to plug ArLiSNAP as a pretty low-stakes way to get involved with ARLIS/NA, especially for new professionals who might be working at a library but not an art library yet (I was doing general collection development when I started volunteering).

I’m also serving on the Professional Development Committee for ARLIS/NA, a term that began at the conference this year. I got involved with that by applying when the call went out on the listserv. There’s an open spot on the committee still so if you’re interested email me (hunt.877 at osu.edu), and I can put you in touch with the chair!

I also interacted with my colleagues by getting social! This is not always an available option for everyone. People have different levels of social anxiety or a pretty set capacity for networking in one day. But I find it really beneficial to get to know other art librarians “off the clock” so going out for drinks and talking in a more casual way about our jobs was super beneficial and enriching to me.

Get on the listserv! It’s active but not overwhelming and really helps to stay plugged in to what’s going on in the association.

View outside the Natural History Museum of Utah.

Photo by Courtney Hunt. View outside the Natural History Museum of Utah.

Pitch attending the conference next year! What makes you want to go again?

Yay! Yes! I do want to go again! There are many reasons. I think now that I’ve been once, I know what to expect, and I also know that art librarians are the BEST. It’s honestly the people and the sharing more than anything else that makes me want to attend again. Of course my committee work and the fact that I’m a tenure-track librarian also make me want to go again, but even if I wasn’t TT I’d want to be involved. Next year though I’ve got to step up my wardrobe game, cause y’all are some stylish librarians!

Now it’s Autumn’s turn!
Hey Autumn! You were awarded a travel grant for the conference! That’s awesome, congratulations! For our readers…what was the process for applying for that? Any requirements? Were you happy you applied?

Thank you so much! I applied for this award when I was still a student and it is intended for current students or individuals who have recently graduated. I was shocked to receive it! I applied really not expecting anything to come of it, as I expected there to be a lot of applicants and I’m not currently working directly in an art librarian/art library position (though it is my passion!) The application process was extremely manageable. Applicants needed to answer 3 questions:

  • Please describe why you are eligible for the selected award.
  • Please describe your specific interests and expectations of the conference.
  • Please provide a brief list of your employment history, education, and professional activities.

I’m pretty sure you needed to submit a resume/CV and references, too. I can’t remember the exact application deadlines, but I believe it was sometime in November or December, so keep an eye out next year, y’all!

I know that you recently graduated with your MLIS and you are a current staff member at University of Michigan — do you think that anyone who works in a library might find value at ARLIS/NA? What was most worth it to you?

Honestly, the conference refocused me and that was probably what was most worthwhile about it. I’ve been feeling a little bit lost since graduating and unsure what to do with my future, career, etc. Going to ARLIS/NA just solidified the thoughts spinning around in my head, that a career in the arts and libraries is really what I want to keep pursuing in my future, no matter the obstacles or difficulties. Even if I don’t specifically end up as an “official” art librarian in a future job, I want to keep incorporating my passion for the arts into my work a much as I can and pursue my own research in the field.

View from the highway of the mountains.

Photo by Courtney Hunt. View from the highway of the mountains.

How did you get involved, interact, collaborate with your colleagues at this conference?

It was really great to meet so many ArLiSNAP volunteers in-person! I’ve been volunteering on and off since 2017, so it was really nice to talk in real life. I enjoyed the ArLiSNAP meeting, which gave us a chance to talk a little bit about what we do and connect with attendees who may be interested in joining the org. I said it at the meeting and I’ll say it again, ArLiSNAP is a good way to get involved. Everyone is really supportive and friendly! I also presented a poster at the conference and I got to chat with a lot of different people about my work. Through my poster presentation I even made connection with someone who I actually ended up having a lot in common with! It was cool. I also made this trip with a couple of my University of Michigan colleagues who I’ve always been friendly with, but it was really nice to get to connect and know them better.

Pitch attending the conference next year! What makes you want to go again?

I agree with you that it’s really the people and sharing that made the conference so great and what makes me want to go next year and every year after! As someone not working as an art librarian or in an art library, the conference allowed me to connect with others who share similar passions and interests to my own. This isn’t something that always happens so easily in your own job/institution/etc., ya know? Attending the conference sparked so many different ideas in my head and made me realize that I need to pursue the projects that I am passionate about when I can, even if this means initiating them/taking charge/going solo. I’m lucky in that I have quite a bit of flexibility in my institution to turn my passions into projects at work. Before going to ARLIS/NA, I was feeling pretty burnt out. It really revitalized me to be surrounded by such a great community!

Also, I want to add that visiting Spiral Jetty was an amazing start to my conference trip! It was a lot of fun and very relaxing and meditative.

We hope that was useful for you readers! For those of you who haven’t attended the annual conference before, is there anything you’d like to know other than what our feature writers mentioned? Hit us up!

2018 ARLIS/NA Ontario Travel Award Deadline Extended!

The deadline for the applications of the 2018 ARLIS/NA Ontario Travel Award to attend “Out of Bounds”, the annual ARLIS/NA conference in New York City, February 25 – March 1, 2018 (originally announced November 11, 2017) has been extended until Sunday, January 21st, 2018.

All are welcome to apply.  Students, new professionals and ARLIS/NA Ontario members are strongly encouraged.

For details and eligibility, please visit the website (note that the date has not yet been updated to reflect the extension) or email arlisna.ontario@gmail.com.

Join ArLiSNAP at the 2018 ARLIS Winter Conference!

The ARLIS 2018 Winter Conference will be held in New York City from February 25-March 1. Registration for the conference is now open, and we hope that you’ll consider attending one of ArLiSNAP’s events while you’re in town.

Attend our Annual Meeting
Sunday February 25 | 3:00pm – 4:00pm

At our annual meeting we will discuss what ArLiSNAP has been up to in the last year and our plans for 2018. Let us know what kind of content and information you hope to see in the next year and hear about upcoming opportunities to volunteer and participate in our community.

ArLiSNAP Night Out!
Tuesday, February 27 | 7:30pm

Join ArLiSNAP at The Stag’s Head on Tuesday, February 27 @ 7:30 PM. Our night out is an opportunity to meet other students and new professionals from around the country to talk about our conference experiences. The pub is just a short walk from the conference, at 252 E 51st St, and we hope to see many of you there!

Register for our Workshop
Thursday, March 1 | 9:00am – 1:00pm

Attend ArLiSNAP’s career development workshop featuring a career advice panel hosted by our co-moderator Breanne Crumpton. Get tips on writing the perfect cover letter and receive expert and peer critiques on your resume. In our final panel, learn more about the academic publishing industry and how to get started as an author.

The workshop is free! Read more about our speakers and activities here.

 

Questions about ArLiSNAP’s events at the winter conference? Email our conference liaison at michelle.wilson(at)rutgers.edu

Michelle Wilson
ArLiSNAP Conference Liaison