A Success Story: An Interview with Molly Schoen

Molly Schoen works as a Visual Resources Curator at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. She was kind enough to answer a few questions and tell us more about her work and experience!

Can you tell us a little bit about your background, your current position, and how you got into the field of art librarianship?

It all started in my undergrad years (at Michigan State University), when I got a part-time job working in the Government Documents library. I found that I really enjoyed getting things in order, like cleaning up messy catalog records. And I loved the tactile nature of the work, too: bone folders, label makers, tattle tape and date stamps! I was getting a Bachelor’s in English but didn’t know what to do with it, so I decided to go to library school. I ended up getting accepted in to Wayne State University’s Fine & Performing Arts Librarian program, which was great because I’ve always been interested in art and music.

After getting my MLIS, I worked part-time at a collection of modern and contemporary black art in Flint, MI. Three years later, I got a full-time position at the University of Michigan, in their Visual Resources Collections. The experience from that job helped me land my current position of Visual Resources Curator at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, NY. I’ve been working here for a year and a half now, and I love it!

What does a typical day at work look like for you?
A typical day for me depends on what time of year it is. Right now, in the middle of the summer semester, there’s hardly anyone around. So I use this time to really get in the zone and catch up on image orders, where our History of Art faculty request images they need for teaching. I also assist faculty on their projects, such as building databases and other online resources.

Things are busier during the academic year. Along with our department technician, we will make sure our HA classrooms are up-to-date and advocate for upgrades. I also present one-shot sessions on visual literacy to various classes throughout the university, showing students how to find and use visual media ethically and efficiently. Because FIT is full of artistic students, I’ll demonstrate strategies to safeguard their own work and answer copyright questions. I’ve also worked on securing publishing rights for images a professor wanted to include in a book she was writing.

Do you have any advice for current students and/or those on the job market?
Volunteer and get a wide variety of experience under your belt. I finished grad school in 2009, which was not exactly the best time to be looking for a job. I was worried I wouldn’t find anything in the art libraries field, so I volunteered at the reference desk of a public library to get additional experience. I had volunteered at the Visual Resources Collections at U of M before I was hired there, and that really helped me land the full-time gig.

I would also say not to discount service industry jobs. I used to be really shy, and waiting tables and working in retail helped me get over that. These kinds of jobs may seem unrelated to library work, but they demonstrate to employers that you can handle conflict and think on your feet.

What were/are some challenges for you as a new art librarian? Are these related to larger challenges in art librarianship?
I think staying on top of technology is always a challenge. As a librarian, I want to be able to recommend the best products and resources for our faculty and students to use. That also ties into a larger challenge faced by our profession: justifying our work to administrators looking to slash budgets. People have asked me, why do we need libraries now when there’s Google? That’s like saying why do we need doctors when there’s WebMD? Google will bring you a million results; a librarian will find you the right one.

Tell us something fun about yourself! What do you do in your spare time?
In my spare time I like to oil paint and play guitar!

Free webinar, VRA travel award, & CFP

As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great webinars, CFPs, and scholarship opportunities below!

Webinar:

Title: Communicating Through Infographics

Presenter: Dawne Tortorella

Format: Webinar

Date: Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Start Time: 12 Noon Pacific

1PM Mountain

2PM Central

3PM Eastern

This webinar will last approximately one hour. Webinars are free of charge. Please note: we have changed hosting services fromWebEx to Adobe Connect, so we advise you to test your browser before the webinar: http://intesolv.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

For more webinar tips, see: http://infopeople.org/webinar/tips.

For more information and to participate in the Wednesday, November 14, 2012 webinar, go to http://infopeople.org/training/communicating-through-infographics.

· Have you noticed the growing trend of communicating through infographics?

· Do you wonder where the data comes from and how to verify information displayed in visual form?

· Would you rather read a 100 page report or look at a visual presentation that conveys the story in less than one minute?

· Would you like to tell a compelling story about your library through the medium of infographics?

Visual representation of information has existed for hundreds of years in various forms and formats. Infographics (information graphics) represent the latest visual form to gain popularity. Telling an effective story through infographics requires accurate data, compelling design, and visualization tools.

During this one-hour webinar, we will discuss and demonstrate:

· blogs and infographic search resources to find examples and track trends

· differences between infographics, poster art, and data visualization

· common data sources used in infographics (big data and local sources)

· suggest library-specific data and statistics appropriate for visual presentation

· visualization tools for experimentation

This webinar will be of interest to library staff at all levels and in all types of libraries who need to present information to customers, stakeholders, and management. Senior staff and directors responsible for board reporting are especially encouraged to attend. If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar. Check our archive listing at: http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived.

 VRA Travel Award:

VRA Travel Awards are available for attendance at the 2013 VRA conference “Capitalizing on Creativity” in Providence, Rhode Island April 3-6. The deadline for receipt of applications will be Monday, November 26, 10 am EST. The list of recipients will be announced on the VRA listserv the third week of December.

A preliminary conference schedule with a listing of workshops and sessions has already been posted at: http://vra2013annualconference.sched.org and information about costs is posted here:http://www.vraweb.org/conferences/vra31/?page_id=8 and here: http://www.vraweb.org/conferences/vra31/?page_id=11

Before you apply, PLEASE READ “Travel Award Rules and Guidelines”, “Tips for VRA Travel Awards Applicants”, and “Types of Travel Awards”, all linked here as PDFs: http://www.vraweb.org/about/awards/index.html#travel

HERE’S THE LINK TO THE APPLICATION:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEM1Zkdsdlo2dGZ1TEJRN3hGQWxjR2c6MQ#gid=0

The form is also linked from the What’s New on the VRA homepage.

You do not need to be a member of the VRA to apply for a travel award, but please note that upon winning an award an applicant who is not a member of VRA must purchase a membership, with the option to use funding from the travel award to do this. This year by removing the membership requirement for all applicants, we hope to draw more interest and expand membership.

In order to allow funding to go further, Tansey awards will be distributed according to financial need i.e. full awards (up to $850) may be given to some, whilst lower amounts may be awarded to others with partial institutional/ other support.

For 2013, we are fortunate to have generous financial support from sponsors and funds provided by the membership:

* The Kathe Hicks Albrecht award of $850 for a first-time conference attendee

* Two New Horizons awards of $850 each. These awards are aimed at members in the following categories: solo VR professionals, part-time VR professionals, geographically isolated VR professionals, VR professionals in smaller institutions, and/or first-time attendees

* The Joseph C. Taormina Memorial award of $250 for an applicant with partial funding

* A New Horizons student award of $300, for a full-time student enrolled in an accredited degree program and considering a career in visual resources

* $4800 in Tansey fund awards ranging from $250 to $850 each

More awards may become available and will be announced on this listserv. Also, stay tuned and watch VRA-L and the VRA website for further details about the conference. Please email if you have any questions not answered by the documents noted above.

So don’t delay – apply today!

We look forward to receiving your applications,

Heidi Eyestone & Vicky Brown

Co-Chairs, VRA Travel Awards Committee

Heidi Eyestone

Visual Resources Collection

Art and Art History

Carleton College

One North College Street

Northfield, MN 55057

507 222-5399

507 222-7042 fax

Vicky Brown, Visual Resources Curator

History of Art Department, University of Oxford

Suite 9, Littlegate House

St Ebbes

Oxford OX1 1PT

UK

+44 (0)1865 286839

victoria.brown@hoa.ox.ac.uk

 

CFP:

Call for Book Chapters: Collecting the Contemporary (Book to be published by MuseumsEtc in 2013)

URL: http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0062/7112/files/CFP_CollectingTheContemporary.pdf?5

COLLECTING THE CONTEMPORARY

Edited by Owain Rhys and Zelda Baveystock

We invite international submissions to be included in this forthcoming book, to be published by MuseumsEtc in 2013.

The book will be edited by Owain Rhys, Curator of Contemporary Life at St Fagans: National History Museum, Wales and Zelda Baveystock, Lecturer in Arts Management and Museum Studies at Manchester University.

Why and how should social history museums engage with contemporary collecting? To fill gaps in the collection? To record modern urban life? To engage with minority communities? To link past and present? There are many possible responses… And many museums collect contemporary objects, stories, images and sounds – consciously or unconsciously. But reasoned policies and procedures are very often lacking. And – given the uniquely detailed record of contemporary life recorded by ubiquitous media – how best are museums to record and present contemporary life in their collections?

 

An overview of contemporary collecting in a social historical context is well overdue. Original source material, ideas, developments and research has never before been brought together in a single volume. This book will bring together practitioners from around the world to provide a contemporary and convenient reader which aims to lay the foundations for future initiatives.

We welcome submissions – of between 3000 and 5000 words – on the practice, theory and history of contemporary collecting in social history museums, based on – but not confined to – the following issues and themes. We are particularly interested in new and pioneering initiatives and innovative thinking in this field.

Practice

Projects (including community outreach, externally funded collection programmes, projects with specific goals)

Exhibitions (including popular culture, contemporary political issues, under-represented groups

Networks – including SAMDOK and other initiatives

Fieldwork and contemporary collecting

Adopting a scientific approach to contemporary collecting

Audio-visual recording

The influence of the internet, how to collect, and associated museological issues

Contemporary collecting and contemporary issues

Access, storage and conservation issues

Theory

What to collect?

How to collect?

Who should collect?

Community involvement – advantages and disadvantages

Contemporary collecting – key priority or passing fad?

Definitions of contemporary collecting

Should contemporary collecting be object or people based?

Alternatives to the accepted norms

The case for nationally or regionally co-ordinated policies

The impact of social and digital media for the future of contemporary collecting

History

Origins and development of contemporary collecting

Differences between institutions and countries (e.g. Sweden’s ethnological approach v. Britain’s social history approach)

The editors

Owain Rhys has recently published Contemporary Collecting: Theory and Practice with MuseumsEtc. This book gathered together disparate strands of contemporary collecting theory and history, and provided an insight into current practices at St Fagans: National History Museum. Owain is interested in formalising definitions and procedures, and in strengthening the bonds between those museums involved in contemporary collecting. Zelda Baveystock has a longstanding interest in contemporary collecting. As the first Keeper of Contemporary Collecting at Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums, she established a subject specialist network of urban history museums actively involved in the field in 2004. She has lectured and taught on the subject in the UK, and in Sweden.

Submissions

If you are interested in being considered as a contributor, please send an abstract (up to 250 words) and a short biography to both the editors and the publishers at the following addresses: owain.rhys@museumwales.ac.uk,zelda.baveystock@manchester.ac.uk and books@museumsetc.com by 10 December 2012. Enquiries should also be sent to these addresses. Contributors will receive a complimentary copy of the publication and a discount on more.

The book will be published in print and digital editions by MuseumsEtc in 2013.

Deadlines

ABSTRACTS: 10 DECEMBER 2012

CONTRIBUTORS NOTIFIED: 11 JANUARY 2013

COMPLETED PAPERS: 2 APRIL 2013

 

Grant, webinar, and other professional development opportunities!

See educational opportunities, such as CFP, workshops, events, webinars, etc.? Please email Braegan Abernethy (bcabernethy[at]gmail[dot]com) or Emilee Mathews (mathewse[at]indiana[dot]edu) to get them posted here.

For ongoing opportunities and deadlines, please visit the new Educational Opportunities Calendar.

REMINDER: The final deadline for Papers, Sessions, and Workshops Proposals for the ARLIS/NA 2013 Annual Conference Crafting Our Future is this Friday, June 29.

Call for Contributors
A new website devoted to art, thought, and surprise inspired by the content found in freely available digital archives, Each Moment a Mountain is seeking contributions and collaborations with writers, archivists, teaching librarians, and other educators.
www.eachmomentamountain.org
Contributions
Each Moment a Mountain is looking for contributors in the following categories: blessays (see http://www.dancohen.org/2012/05/24/the-blessay/), fiction, poetry, music, visual/multimedia art, and interviews of artists and scholars working with the concept of memory. More information on submissions can be found at the following URL:
http://www.eachmomentamountain.org/submissions/
Collaborations
Each Moment a Mountain is also looking for history educators, teaching librarians, archivists, and others interested in using the site as a pedagogical tool. The editors are open to your ideas, but provide the following as examples of the collaborations we’re looking for:
-The design and execution of information literacy sessions, student assignments, or classroom activities around the use of Each Moment a Mountain in your classroom (including both responses to the site and student contributions).
-The nomination of archives to be featured on the site.
-The development of curricular tools and documentation that illustrate use of Each Moment a Mountain to meet curricular standards like The Common Core, VALUE rubrics, and others.
-Sustained partnerships and titled positions for the right collaborators.
Potential contributors and collaborators can get in touch with the editors at eachmomentamountain@gmail.com. All are welcome to follow Each Moment a Mountain on Twitter for content updates and more: @eachmomenta

Nancy Pearl Presents Book Lust Rediscoveries
Tuesday, July 10, 2pm Eastern
Join esteemed Seattle librarian Nancy Pearl in conversation with two authors from her new book series, Book Lust Rediscoveries, a publishing program devoted to reintroducing some of the best (and now out of print) novels originally published between 1960-2000. Each new edition is personally selected by Nancy Pearl and includes an introduction by her, discussion questions for book groups, and a list of recommended further reading. She will be joined by Rhian Ellis, author of After Life, and Frederick G. Dillen, author of Fool, to discuss the series, as well as their own favorite moments of discovering a wonderful book. The discussion will be moderated by the series’ editor, Alan Turkus, and hosted by Booklist Adult Books senior editor Donna Seaman.
https://alapublishing.webex.com/mw0307l/mywebex/default.do?nomenu=true&siteurl=alapublishing&service=6&rnd=0.6519851798076816&main_url=https%3A%2F%2Falapublishing.webex.com%2Fec0606l%2Feventcenter%2Fevent%2FeventAction.do%3FtheAction%3Ddetail%26confViewID%3D1002700739%26%26%26%26siteurl%3Dalapublishing


The Visual Resources Association’s 31st Annual Conference will be held in Providence, Rhode Island, from Wednesday, April 3 through Saturday, April 6, 2013, in the Providence Biltmore, a cherished architectural treasure.
Proposals are now being solicited for the 2013 program sessions, workshops, papers, special interest/user groups, and case studies.  All proposals are welcome, especially those related to the 2013 VRA Conference theme, “Capitalizing on Creativity”.   Click here to go to the conference proposal form, which can also be accessed through the Visual Resources Association page.
A session is a 90 minute moderated session with 3 to 4 speakers at 20 minutes each followed by a facilitated brief question and answer period.
A workshop is a 3 to 4 hour workshop to develop skills and experience in the field of Visual Resources, preferably with hands-on activities.
A paper is an individual idea submission, which will be reviewed for possible grouping into a session.
A special interest group is a 60 to 90-minute informal facilitated group discussion on topics related to a specific community within VRA.
A case study is detailed information about an individual, small group, or project, generally including the accounts of subjects themselves.  Moderators are encouraged to submit proposals.  Individual case study proposals will be reviewed for possible groupings similar to the session format.
The quality of conference content depends upon YOUR ideas and contributions, so get those creative juices flowing.  Use the “Capitalizing on Creativity” conference theme, suggested topics from VRA members (see below), and your imagination to propose ideas which expand our outlooks beyond that which is familiar.  If there is an area of concern or interest that you feel has not been adequately addressed in previous programs, do consider participating in this process by submitting a proposal.  Moderators may put out calls for speakers within a proposed topic before submission of completed topics.  The VRA Executive Board will be looking for complete, concise and articulate submissions with lists of presenters, when applicable. Specificity regarding audio-visual needs including live internet connectivity is recommended.
To stimulate the creative process, here are some excellent suggestions for proposal themes and topics selected from the post-conference survey responses, listed in no particular order:

  • VRC physical space issues
  • Cross-disciplinary outreach
  • Multidisciplinary cataloging
  • African art cataloging
  • Project and time management
  • Copyright sharing
  • Open access
  • Budget cut impacts
  • Digital content archiving and preservation
  • Digital asset management
  • Digital Humanities initiatives
  • VRC/Library collaboration
  • Fate of VR analog collections
  • VR curators/teachers (dual roles)
  • eBook and eJournal image content
  • Crisis management
  • Image tagging
  • Digitizing and access of student work

Questions about the proposal process and the various presentation formats included in the VRA Conference program can be directed to me at .
The proposal deadline is July 27, 2012.  I look forward to receiving your proposals!

Visual Resources Association Foundation Professional Development Grant
Purpose:
The purpose of the VRAF Professional Development grant is to support professional development in the field of visual resources and image management. The grant will support attendance at an educational event of the grantee’s choosing (such as an association conference, symposium or workshop), or engagement in relevant research activities (such as publications and/or fieldwork). In recognition of the differing professional development needs for an emerging professional and an established career professional, two awards will be funded. One grant will be awarded to a student or new professional who has up to five years of experience in the field, and the other grant will be designated for a career professional with six or more years of experience. At the discretion of the VRAF Board and with approval of the applicant, an application may be moved to a different category that better fits the experience criteria or the applicant can choose to withdraw the application
Although the specific criteria for the grant may change from year to year in order to provide support for a range of experiences and community members, with the 2012-2013 awards we encourage the VR community to consider opportunities at any visual resources-related professional development venue.
The VRAF Professional Development Grant is part of the Foundation’s mission to advance awareness of critical issues for effective digital information management (including intellectual property and copyright); to encourage the application of professional standards, innovative technology, and metadata cataloging protocols; and to facilitate workplace training. The VRA Foundation supports a range of educational offerings to help ensure that such information reaches a diverse, global audience.
Award Amount:
Each of the two 2012-2013 awards will provide a grant of $850. The grant is for use between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013.
Eligibility:
The grant is open to all visual resource professionals, including retirees and those currently unemployed. The Foundation also encourages students seeking educational, training, and research opportunities in support of broad access to cultural information, to apply. Membership in the Visual Resources Association is not required. Each applicant’s financial statement of need will be considered, together with other applications for funding for the same event or project, which must be disclosed by the applicant.
Grant monies may be used for:

  • transportation
  • registration/tuition
  • accommodations
  • meals
  • research
  • expenses

Application Deadline and Decision Announcement:
Applications for the 2012-2013 grants due: Friday, July 20, 2012
Award decision public announcement: August 31, 2012
Guidelines and Application Form: http://vrafoundation.org.s119319.gridserver.com/index.php/grants/professional_development_grant/
Application Form:
http://vrafoundation.org/downloads/VRAF_PDGrantCall_for_Applic2012.doc
http://vrafoundation.org/downloads/VRAF_PDGrantCall_for_Applic2012.pdf
Completed applications, as well as any preliminary questions, should be sent via e-mail to:
Alix Reiskind, VRA Foundation Board Director areiskind@gsd.harvard.edu

Infopeople’s webinar “Hack Your Career: Dream Job FTW!”
Title:  Hack Your Career: Dream Job FTW!
Presenters: Nicole Pasini and Jesse Lanz
Format:  Webinar
Date:  Wednesday, July 18, 2012
Start Time: 12 Noon Pacific
            1PM Mountain
            2PM Central
            3PM Eastern
This webinar will last approximately one hour. Webinars are free of charge.  Registration is ONLY done on the day of the event on the WebEx server starting 30 minutes before the start of the webinar. No Passwords are required.  For Tips and Registration Information, please go to http://infopeople.org/training/webcasts/tips.html
For more information and to participate in the Wednesday, July 18, 2012 webinar, go tohttp://infopeople.org/training/hack-your-career

  • Do you know what your dream job is, but don’t quite know how to get it?
  • Are you an ideal job candidate with less-than-ideal interview skills?
  • Are you stymied by the civil service process?

There is no denying that the job market is tough these days, but there are steps you can take to ensure that your next interviewer sees you as the best candidate for the job.  And for those of you who are employed, there are steps you can take to ensure that the work that you do today could help land your dream job someday.
In this one-hour webinar you will:

  • Learn to approach the job search and interview process from the perspective of the person doing the hiring.  
  • Gain insight into how to think strategically about your current job, as well asabout how to prepare to get the next one.
  • Discover tips for navigating the often baffling world of the civil service application and interview.  
  • Learn the things that hiring managers wish every job candidate knew.  

Though we can’t promise a recovery of the job market, we’re certain that in this webinar you’ll learn ways to Hack Your Career—Dream Job, For the Win!
At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:

  • Identify the three questions they need to answer before beginning the job search process.
  • Understand the three major ways that civil service hiring processes differ from hiring processes in the private and nonprofit sectors.
  • Identify ten steps that go into successful resumes, applications and interviews, from the perspective of hiring managers.

This webinar will be of interest to public library staff (though there will be plenty of useful information for staffs of all types of libraries), library school students, job seekers, or any people who are thinking about the next stage of their careers.
If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar.  Check our archive listing at:  http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived

CAVRACON at UCSB June 16-17th, 2011

THE NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTERS OF THE VISUAL RESOURCES ASSOCIATION cordially invite you to the California Visual Resources Association Conference, also known as CAVRACON, which will be held Thursday, June 16th and Friday, June 17th, 2011 at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/cavraconference/

CaVraCon will provide workshops, presentations and demos dealing with the many aspects of creating, managing and maintaining digital image collections, as well as the opportunity to network with both emerging professionals and veterans of the field.

The conference will be open to any interested parties regardless of organizational or institutional affiliation.  Check the above site for registration information.

HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE: 

Patricia Harpring (Managing Editor Getty Vocabulary Program)
Developing local authority files for the CCO/CDWA categories and a discussion of CONA

Megan Marler (ArtSTOR, Senior Analyst for Strategic Initiatives)
ArtSTOR?s Shared Shelf

George Helfand (Luna Imaging, Inc., Account Manager)
Expanding Your Scope: A Workflow for Adding Books to a Digital Image Collection

Greg Reser (UCSD, Metadata Specialist) and Sheryl Frisch (CalPoly, San Luis Obispo, Visual Resource Specialist)
The VRA Custom XMP Info Panel: How do I use it?

Jan Eklund (UC Berkeley, Business Systems Analyst, IST Data Services) and Chris Hoffman (UC Berkeley, Manager of Informatics Services, IST Data Services)
Deploying CollectionSpace for a VR Collection

Tom Moon (UCSB Library, Digitization Unit Manager)
Structuring Workflows: implementing new procedures without disruption

Lois McLean and Rick Tessman (McLean Media, Content Clips)
Content Clips, An Online Tool for Teaching with Digital Images

Dr. James Bartholomay Kiracofe (Director, Inter-American Institute for Advanced Studies in Cultural History)
Images for Education, On the road with an academic photographer

As well as a Plenary by the Visual Resources Association President, Maureen Burns (IMAGinED Consulting), Case Studies, tours and more!

Things to bring: flip-flops, laptops and business cards.
Please send questions to John Trendler <john.trendler@scrippscollege.edu>
We look forward to seeing you!

CALL FOR PRESENTERS: ACRL ARTS SECTION’S DISCUSSION FORUM

Are you doing research in the arts that you would like to share with fellow librarians? Is there something you’re doing at your library dealing with the arts that you think others should know about? Do you have a presentation you’d like to float by a group of friendly colleagues for some benevolent critique?

If so, the ACRL Arts section invites you to submit a presentation proposal for our Discussion Forum held on Saturday, June 25th from 10:30-12noon during the ACRL Annual Conference in New Orleans, LA.

Details:

–Proposals can be about any topic dealing with the visual or performing arts and design (see list of possible topics below).
–Everyone is welcome to submit a proposal. Students are also encouraged to make a submission.
–Each presentation will have 15-20 minutes with a 5 minute Q&A. We anticipate being able to accept 4-5 proposals for presentation.
–Proposals will be reviewed by a committee drawn from the Arts Section Executive Board and Publications & Research Committee.

Deadline: Please submit your proposals to Yen Tran (nttran@callutheran.edu), chair of the Arts Section’s Publications & Research Committee no later than May 27th. Those submitting proposals will be notified by June 3rd, as to whether or not your proposal was accepted for presentation.

Possible topics:

–Research of any topic related to the arts
–Developments in the display and/or preservation of arts materials
 –Innovative information literacy or visual literacy techniques with arts students
–Emerging technologies in arts libraries
–Inventive collection management and development in the arts
–Strategies for reaching out to arts users (students and faculty)
–Copyright and fair use in the arts environment
–Evaluating the needs of arts users
–Use of images in information literacy instruction
–Creative physical or online/virtual exhibits

The possibilities are endless; please consider submitting a proposal.

HELP! Quick Sample of Questions for Student CCO Project…

Hi all,

De-lurking here. Finishing up my semester at Pratt, student project due on Cataloging Cultural Objects. If you can take a few minutes to answer as many of the questions as you can, maybe even add some comments, I’ll be very grateful. (Any responses you wish kept off the record will be honored.)

Thanks, Louis in Brooklyn.

1-Do you/your institution use CCO? If so, for how long? If not, any particular reasons?

2-If you don’t use CCO, how familiar are you with it? Self-study, or from other work/interests?

3-How effective are the CCO content standards? Also, do you find it easy to use/implement?

4-What are your favorite/least favorite features? (What do you like best/least about it?)

5-BIG one for my project: Have you seen users’ image searches improve with CCO? Why or why not?
(Any anecdotes, examples, will be extremely appreciated.)

6-CCO: Wave of the future? Or not enough to achieve goals?

7-How easy is CCO to use with other descriptive standards tools & metadata element sets?

8-Whether you use CCO or not, does your work entail more of documenting cultural objects or describing images of objects?

If there is anything you’d like to add that I haven’t addressed, please feel free to include.

Thanks in advance for everyone’s help! Hope I can either return the favor and/or pay it forward, and have a great holiday season, all!

Louis Munoz
louismunoz@yahoo.com

National Audio-Visual Conservation Center

“The new National Audio-Visual Conservation Center (NAVCC) of the Library of Congress will be the first centralized facility in America especially planned and designed for the acquisition, cataloging, storage and preservation of the nation’s heritage collections of moving images and recorded sounds.”

For more information, go to MIC’s Web site.

Also, for information on the retooling of the old Cold War Federal Reserve bunker, go here.

Visual Resources Curator (Library Specialist II), Art and Architecture Library

The University Libraries, Virginia Tech

The Art and Architecture Library at Virginia Tech seeks a full-time curator to manage its visual resources collection. The successful candidate will manage and develop the visual resources collection of digital images, slides, and architectural plans.

Complete job description and application form are available at: www.jobs.vt.edu (Posting number 061253)

Position Responsibilities

Reporting to the Art and Architecture Librarian, manages the day-to-day operations of the Visual Resources Unit (VRU) in the Art and Architecture Library. Provides general reference, instruction and patron orientation in the Library and Visual Resources Unit. Provides instruction in image collection use to university students and faculty. Instructs faculty in the use of digital image software and its use in the classroom. Creates metadata schema according to standards. Conducts original cataloging of images according to standards and oversees the processing of visual material. Hires, trains, schedules and supervises five part-time student assistants. Helps circulate Library and VRU materials.

Qualifications

Required: Bachelor’s degree in Art History or related field (e.g. Art History, Architecture, Archaeology, Fine Arts, Museum Studies). Knowledge of image cataloging and copyright issues. Experience with graphics and web authoring software. Skilled in the use of digital cameras, copy stands, scanning equipment, digital and slide projectors.

Preferred: Graduate degree in a field related to position (e.g. MA in a related field or MLIS) preferred. Experience providing instruction or training to adults. Experience using Luna Insight software or similar image database software. Experience in supervision, planning, and scheduling. Experience with automated library systems and library operations.

Virginia Tech has a strong commitment to the principles of diversity and is an affirmative action and equal opportunity employer. Applications from minorities, women, and persons with disabilities are encouraged. Individuals with special needs desiring accommodations in the application process should notify Ms. Cathy Pillow (email: cathyp@vt.edu; phone: 540-231-4407).