Canadian Librarians Spotlight: An Interview with Daniel Payne

What is the name of the employer/institution you work for?

The Dorothy H. Hoover Library, OCAD University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Can you tell us a little bit about your background, your current position, and how you got into the field of (art) librarianship?

I have a Bachelor of Education and a Master’s degree in musicology, but I never really felt fully comfortable in either environment. Teaching in a traditional classroom is rewarding; however, I always feel so confined in my ability to access knowledge-building tools. In a library, I am surrounded by informational learning resources—print, electronic, audio-visual, or through the knowledge of my peers—and this level of connectedness cannot be replicated in even the most high-tech, wired, “smart” classroom.

I started working at OCAD University in 2002 and moved from a contract position at a smaller Canadian university that likely was going to become a permanent, tenure track position. When the job at OCAD U was posted—even though the pay was not ideal and the faculty status situation not as secure, I took the risk as it offered an ideal opportunity to explore librarianship in a creative research environment, which for me is a perfect way to combine my artistic and academic interests.

What does a typical day at work look like for you? What is usually the highlight of your day?

One of the best things about working in libraries is that there really are no “typical days.” Although I do spend much time in my workweek covering reference desk services, I’m fairly consistently in the classroom offering information literacy sessions for courses, attending curriculum meetings, working on professional development activities, buying books, helping manage our database collections, developing our web site, preparing for conferences, researching and writing, and so on. I feel that, as a librarian, I’m able to define what my work day will look like and not be confined by the classroom, with its set class times, static textbooks, and limited office hours.

Perhaps—in all honesty—the highlight of my day is working at the reference desk. Although many academic librarians are moving away from this service node in favour of the classroom, I find it one of the most vital tools I have as a librarian for communicating collegially with students, staff, and faculty. I can’t count the number of information literacy sessions, collection development requests, and professional networking contacts I’ve made through the random, informal discussions I’ve had at the reference desk. It is a communications platform that is unique; educators such as Paulo Friere often advocate for reform in pedagogy through the use of active learning models which empower researchers to discover their own sense-making pathways to knowledge. I truly feel that the reference desk is one of the most powerful learning spaces we currently have in our educational system for fully embodying a more egalitarian, democratic approach to learning in what Friere calls the “practices of freedom.” It’s because the person asking the question initiates the research journey and, in a way, is in direct control over the educational experience. I work collegially with them to try to come to some resolution, but a reference inquiry is truly a patron-led mode of teaching and learning.

Do you have any advice for current students and/or those on the job market? What are the most important things emerging art librarians should know?

I find this a very difficult question to answer; mainly because we are currently in a very challenging work environment and it seems that many of the older established models for librarianship as a profession are changing. But I would encourage all new librarians to be patient, proactive, and passionate. Patience is required because those perfect jobs are rarely available immediately and realistically one has to build towards this ultimate goal. Sometimes—and this is difficult for me to say as I feel that I do have the perfect job!—these “dream” jobs simply don’t exist, so one is forced to put together a career piecemeal.

This is where the proactive component is important. Being flexible and adaptable; smiling through adversity; being willing to re-locate to begin building one’s career are all essential skills. Yet these diverse experiences, though frustrating at times, will offer a multi-modal knowledgebase to prepare you for the professional agility required in this new economy. Part of being proactive is also realizing that wherever you are working, you can find some way to use these skillsets to learn something and build your overall life experiences.  I remember hearing a comment by a rising young art gallery owner who worked at the OCAD U Library several years ago re-shelving books. He claimed that everything he knows about art theory was gleaned from putting books back on the shelf. It’s not that he learned about these aesthetic theories in depth—this is unquestionably the domain of the studio or classroom; but the library helped him to understand how these theories relate to other ones by their spatial relation to other books on the shelf. Likely all young aspiring librarians know, based on previous student work experiences, how repetitive re-shelving books can be and, perhaps even more tediously, shelf-reading; but this rising new voice in the art world realized that working in a library was a critical, once in a lifetime opportunity and used it for maximum benefit. So if one envisions this “pastiche” of careers as a collage, it does take on a new sense of unity. It may not be a gesamtkunstwerk (total work of art) expressing one controlled and contained totality, but a collage has a vitality of its own that, in a way, is more dialogic.

Finally, the passion part ensures that—wherever you end up settling career-wise—the founding vision statements of librarianship stay with you. Whether it be the “Statement on Intellectual Freedom” by the Canadian Library Association or S.R. Ranganathan’s Five Laws of Library Science; these documents are revolutionary and, considering how market-driven, commodified, surveilled, and commercialized our lived spaces are becoming, we need to fight for this last bastion of information equity in our world.

What were/are some challenges for you as an art librarian? What do you think are current challenges in the field of art librarianship or librarianship in general, particularly within Canada?

Be warned: I’m going to go on a bit of a tirade ;-) But perhaps my biggest challenge is the feeling that as a librarian, I’m going head-to-head with the massive multi-billion dollar commercial marketing machine of Google! I am only being slightly facetious though; recent statistics provided by OCLC in their Perceptions of Libraries survey indicate that, almost ubiquitously, people are using search engines such as Google as their sole portal for accessing information for all research needs from personal to academic to professional. Primarily my concern is that Google is a private company and the bottom line for all their services is profit. What’s the bottom line for a library that looks to the “Statement on Intellectual Freedom” for its operational mandate? Social justice, human rights, freedom of information, and the right to privacy!

Linked to the for-profit situation, Google searching has enforced a strange impulse in researchers to approach all topics in an almost myopically literal manner. Given the volume of information accessible on the open internet, generally whatever search topic is entered in Google always guarantees results that are precisely related to the initial search topic. Furthermore, almost ubiquitously, that first web link retrieved is a Wikipedia entry (I mean, really, is Wikipedia always the top source for all searches? Doesn’t this make anyone suspicious?). But for me, the essence of research, especially in the work of creativity, is finding something that you don’t expect and having to struggle to figure out why this new, unanticipated information has been retrieved. This scenario is further exacerbated by Google’s search features that start profiling us individually based on our previous search histories and starts feeding us sites that it thinks that we’d be interest in. This, of course, is the quintessential “filter bubble” scenario. So now in my work as a reference librarian, I find that year-by-year, my new mantra is to plead with researchers to stop thinking so literally and start finding pathways for thinking laterally. Our library search tools and collections are entirely built on this latter premise.

Finally, my third and inter-related concern is that the search engine has completely weaned people off of any other search strategies. Google is always Plan A and in the rare circumstances where it fails, people have no Plan B alternatives. Using library catalogues, abstracts and indexes, a library’s discovery layer, even knowing how to browse for books in a library, have all become so foreign to everyday researchers, that these bibliographic literacy practices have left people’s consciousness as viable alternatives for accessing information. Out of sight; out of mind.

Can you talk a little bit about ways that you draw on the more conventional aspects of your LIS education? And what are some things you’ve had to learn on your own?

As a reference librarian, I’ve found that there are two broad topics that have been essential for my work; one is related to theory (and I wish that this had been taught more consistently in my library sciences’ education) and the other, practice (which I sorely wished that I didn’t have to learn in school, but am now so grateful that I did!).

My first educational principle is a deep, reflective knowledge of the writings of former library science theorists. Much of my current work as a librarian is entirely shaped by Brenda Dervin’s concept of sense-making, Carole C. Kuhlthau’s ISP, and S.R. Ranganathan’s “Five Laws of Library Sciences.” I might have stumbled across these visionaries while researching for LIS essays, but I feel that a required course in library history is essential for all ALA accredited programs. Knowing how library workers throughout history have dealt with new technologies, changing research needs, and new modes of accessing knowledge is critical; now more than ever when the pace of change seems to be moving at lightning speed.

Secondly in regards to practice, while in library school I took a course titled “Thesaurus Construction” in which I received the worst mark on my LIS record and close to the lowest in my entire academic career. The curricular material was gruellingly dull; in one class I fell asleep while tipped back in my chair which was balanced on the back two legs. The clatter and ensuing thud was, I’m sure, deafening.  But since then, I have grown to appreciate how these ways of envisioning information in hierarchies, working from broad to narrow terms, has helped me inordinately in assisting others to make sense of how libraries are organized. I use these principles in all my information literacy sessions, when working on web pages, creating search guides, answering reference questions, even when writing emails. When one thinks about the basic organizational unit for libraries—the call number—this unique coding language embodies the hierarchy of subjects that libraries employ: from main classes to subclasses down to Cutter numbers. These unique identifiers—the URL address for the print book on the shelf—encode how libraries envision knowledge structures and convey our sense-making way of processing ideas in the world. The fact that these indexical symbols then become wayfinding devices makes for a perfect metaphor for the entire library endeavour.

What would you consider the most rewarding parts of your job, and what are your biggest challenges as an information professional in an academic library?

I might use much of my earlier Google tirade to answer this question! But perhaps to emphasize this issue anecdotally: most often when I tell people I work as a librarian, after a brief quizzical pause then the inevitable “you must get to read a lot of books!” comment, people always tend to chime in: “I love libraries; I love the smell of books.” Much as I’m loathe to discourage any positive commendation for libraries in an age when the institution seems in such a precarious state, I have found the phrase too glib, almost dismissive. I think it’s because this colloquialism is so steeped in a romanticized sense of nostalgia that it seems to relegate libraries to the status of a charming old dusty antiquarian shoppe. I feel like I should carry a copy of the CLA Statement on Intellectual Freedom wherever I go and make people read it immediately after saying they love libraries. Libraries—and this is where I get to the part about the “most rewarding” part of my job—are radical institutions that are one of the last bastions for advocating for public empowerment with no strings attached.  In a recent interview, I was asked “What do librarians do all day anyway?” I answered that we create communities through fostering communication. The reason that librarians build collections, evaluate research methodologies, manage data, or teach our users how to become information literate is so that people can become active members of a knowledge community. Not only do we teach people how to ask questions, but—perhaps most importantly—we suggest pathways for answering them.  Again, with no strings attached. We’re not trying to sell products, ideas, or lifestyles. We’re here solely so that people can empower themselves with knowledge. So instead of people saying “I love libraries,” I wish they would be a little more specific and say something like, “I love how libraries are so subversively radical”!

Do you have any insight or advice as to how ArLiSNAP can assist in connecting emerging Canadian and American information professionals?

Keep up your membership with ARLIS/NA! The Society has been so remarkable in maintaining an open line of communication between countries. At the local level, the avenues that ARLIS/NA offers for students in administrative positions and providing special funding grants are commendable, so participating in regional chapters can open a host of professional opportunities and the capability of attending annual conferences which truly are international ventures.

Tell us something fun about yourself! What do you do in your spare time? If you could take a trip right now to visit any library in the world, which would it be?

I have an insatiable appetite for live music and seem to spend almost every weekend visiting Toronto’s Rex Hotel for a weekly dose of jazz. Also, I’ve been a cellist since high school and spent part of my early career as a professional musician.

Playing music has been an essential part of my life; even though I’m not as active now that I work as a full time reference librarian, I have a much more manageable musical schedule. Aside from ongoing annual performances of Handel’s Messiah with Arcady Choir and Orchestra (http://arcady.ca/), I am focused mainly on my role as the principal cellist for the Counterpoint Community Orchestra (http://www.ccorchestra.org/). I find this collegial music-making environment utterly fulfilling. In the past, I had to rely on making money through performing, but now I can relax and enjoy playing the classics of Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky and more purely for the sake of making music.

And my response for visiting a library? In all honesty, I would re-do the entire ARLIS/NA 2016 Study Tour to Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Utrecht, and Den Hague, in the Netherlands (https://www.arlisna.org/studytour2016-Netherlands/). I splurged and took part in this trip and found that every aspect of the trip was magical!

Art + Feminism + Wikipedia

In March I was invited to three different Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-A-Thons! I had a basic idea of what these were about, but I was eager to get involved and find out more. One was held at MIT Libraries, and one at the Institute of Contemporary Art, but I decided to attend the one held at my beloved alma mater, the Massachusetts College of Art and Design (MassArt). It was hosted by librarians at MassArt, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts and the Tufts School of Arts and Sciences.

As the invitation promised, we were led through basic Wikipedia editing skills by accomplished Wikipedia editor Amanda Rust, the Digital Humanities Librarian and Assistant Director of the Digital Scholarship Group at Northeastern University.

Publish!
Wikipedia editor Eve Kahn on the left, Digital Humanities Librarian Amanda Rust on the right.

After teaching us the basics of Wikipedia editing, Amanda and MassArt librarian Gabrielle Reed talked about the purpose of the project. Gabrielle’s event invitation sums it up well:

Wikimedia’s gender trouble is well-documented. While the reasons for the gender gap are up for debate, the practical effect of this disparity, however, is not. Content is skewed by the lack of female participation. This represents an alarming absence in an increasingly important repository of shared knowledge.

5pillars.jpg
Choosing female artists to represent on Wikipedia.

We were given a list of female artists associated with MassArt who did not yet have a page on Wikipedia, but of course we could also choose any female artist who was not represented. I choose from the list and began doing research on Frances Euphemia Thompson. MassArt librarians helped me find primary research materials on Ms. Thompson. She was an artist and educator, and one of the first African American women to graduate from Massachusetts Normal Art School (the precursor to MassArt).

              

I found some good biographical information on Thompson in this book by Mary Ann Stankiewicz.

          

MassArt librarian Katie Riel at the left, ready to help and/or display our efforts on social media. On the right, MassArt librarian Danielle Sangalang helps me find more information on Ms. Thompson for my very first Wikipedia article, which you can see below and find at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frances_Euphemia_Thompson!

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Talking with MassArt librarian Gabrielle Reed, I was happy to find out that this series of edit-a-thons started at ARLIS! It grow out of the ARLIS/NA Women’s SIG, and was led by Sîan Evans together with Michael Mandiberg, Jacqueline Mabey and Laurel Ptak. From small beginnings, it has grown into an international movement, complete with an online guide to help anyone start an event: http://www.artandfeminism.org/organizing-kit/.  As Gabrielle told me, “They make it so easy for us, there’s not excuse not to do it.”  She added, 

“It’s a concrete way to contribute something – the world is so crazy right now, I feel like it’s important to do things that make a difference.” 

I think we all felt the same way, and we had a great time working together, using our voices to add more diversity to Wikipedia.

happyeditors
Happy Wikipedians!

The Sunday Scoop: Makerspaces and Academic Libraries

Should the workshop materials for art and architecture students stay in the studio? Or should we make space in the library for collaborative and multidisciplinary creative work? What do you think, arlisnappers?

Makerspaces are popping up in many public and school libraries, and are changing the way people see the library. Also known as fablabs, hackerspaces, and techshops, these creative community workshops offer tools, materials, and technology such as 3D printing, video editing software, bookbinding machines, and more. This trend to include the creative arts in libraries is supported by programs such as the Library as Incubator Project, who encourage collaborations between libraries and artists.

So, how does this concept fit in with art and design institutions? In academic libraries, a makerspace can encourage an increase in cross-faculty collaboration, as these work spaces attract students from many disciplines. For art, architecture and design students, spaces such as these could provide them with new creative outlets and expose them to the work of students from other faculties. Technology such as 3D printers and laser cutters that may only be available in certain faculties could become useful resources for these students.

Though academic libraries have been slower to embrace makerspaces, this is starting to change. Campuswide 3D printing has often been the first step in this evolution. The first academic library in the US to offer 3D printing to all students was the DeLaMare Science and Engineering Library at the University of Nevada, which was installed in July of 2012(1). After finding that most library patrons accessed journal articles online, while print copies were taking up valuable space, it was decided that low-use items would be stored in a warehouse to make room for this creative space(2). With whiteboard-painted walls, the space attracts a larger crowd than it previously did: hourly head counts have gone from a maximum of 24 pre-renovations, to now averaging more than 200(2).

The 3D Printer at the DeLaMare Science and Technology Library, University of Nevada, Reno.
The 3D Printer at the DeLaMare Science and Technology Library, University of Nevada, Reno.
Creative Commons licensed image via DSTL UNR.

The University of Michigan’s 3D Lab is another prime example. Located in their Digital Media Commons, the 3D printers and scanners attract students from a range of disciplines. Some examples of its use by design students include making prototypes for shoe designs and iPhone cases with retractable headphones. John Marshall, an assistant professor at the School of Art & Design, regularly uses this technology to create parts for his art, such as THR_33 (Tea House for Robots).

Clearly, there is a great potential for innovation with this concept. My question for you is, how do you think areas such as makerspaces would be best implemented in relation to academic art and design libraries? Would you like to see a similar space in an art library, and which tools would you include? Or do you think makerspaces would be best located outside the library?

We would love to hear your experience with creative spaces in academic libraries. Share your story in the comments below, or on our facebook post.

Interested in learning more about makerspaces? Check out these links:

Libraries & Maker Culture: A Resource Guide: http://library-maker-culture.weebly.com/index.html

Listing of Maker Community Groups: http://archive.makezine.com/groups/

7 Things You Should Know About Makerspaces: http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7095.pdf

Cited Sources:

(1) Wolterbeek, M. “DeLaMare Science and Engineering Library first in nation to offer 3D printing campuswide.” Nevada Today. http://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2012/3d-copier

(2) Good, Travis. (2013). Three Makerspace Models That Work. American Libraries Magazine, January/February. Retrieved from http://www.americanlibrariesmagazine.org/article/manufacturing-makerspaces

Job Posting: Weekend/Evening Librarian at School of Visual Arts

 

DATE AVAILABLE: September 2011
JOB TITLE: Weekend/Evening Librarian (part-time)
DEPARTMENT: Visual Arts Library, School of Visual Arts
REPORTS TO: Head of Reference Services

 

SCHEDULE: Fall and Spring semesters only (September to May, no summers)

 

Hours: Saturday afternoons (2pm to 5pm) and Sunday afternoons (2pm to 6pm); plus one weekday evening 6pm to 9pm (specific weekday may vary semester to semester)

 

SALARY: $ 26.00 per hour

 

POSITION OVERVIEW: Provides reference service in the Visual Arts Library on weekends and one weekday evening. Participates in specialized cataloging projects. Provides support to circulation supervisors as needed.

 

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

 

· Has primary responsibility during weekends and one weekday evening for assisting undergraduates, graduate students and faculty members with library navigation and use of online catalog and electronic resources.

 

· Works on special cataloging projects under the supervision of the technical services/systems librarian.

 

· Performs administrative-related tasks in reference services as required.

 

· Provides support to weekend and evening managers with student supervision, resolution of patron issues, facilities problems, etc.

 

· Reports any patron or staff problems/issues to supervisor. Recommends weekend and evening service improvements.

 

QUALIFICATIONS:

 

· MLS degree and graduate-level Art History degree, or strong background in art & design history

 

· Ability to work 10 hours per week, including weekends and one weekday evening

 

· Experience using online art and design databases

 

· Excellent customer services skills

 

· Cataloging experience, preferably with a variety of formats, in an academic environment

 

· In-depth knowledge of AACR2, LCRI, LCC, LCSH and MARC

 

· Experience with OCLC Connection and ExLibris Voyager preferred

 

· Ability to work independently

 

· Detail oriented, with ability to maintain focus on long-term projects.

 

The School of Visual Arts (SVA) in New York City is an established leader and innovator in the education of artists. From its inception in 1947, the College has instituted numerous educational innovations, including the selection of professionals working in the arts and art-related fields as instructors. SVA provides an environment that nurtures creativity, inventiveness and experimentation, enabling students to develop a strong sense of identity and a clear direction of purpose.

 

Find out what it’s like to work at SVA. Visit http://www.sva.edu/workingatsva

 

To apply for this position, please send a cover letter and resume to working@sva.edu. No walk-ins please.

 

 

 

The School of Visual Arts is an equal opportunity employer.

 

CAVRACON at UCSB June 16-17th, 2011

THE NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTERS OF THE VISUAL RESOURCES ASSOCIATION cordially invite you to the California Visual Resources Association Conference, also known as CAVRACON, which will be held Thursday, June 16th and Friday, June 17th, 2011 at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/cavraconference/

CaVraCon will provide workshops, presentations and demos dealing with the many aspects of creating, managing and maintaining digital image collections, as well as the opportunity to network with both emerging professionals and veterans of the field.

The conference will be open to any interested parties regardless of organizational or institutional affiliation.  Check the above site for registration information.

HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE: 

Patricia Harpring (Managing Editor Getty Vocabulary Program)
Developing local authority files for the CCO/CDWA categories and a discussion of CONA

Megan Marler (ArtSTOR, Senior Analyst for Strategic Initiatives)
ArtSTOR?s Shared Shelf

George Helfand (Luna Imaging, Inc., Account Manager)
Expanding Your Scope: A Workflow for Adding Books to a Digital Image Collection

Greg Reser (UCSD, Metadata Specialist) and Sheryl Frisch (CalPoly, San Luis Obispo, Visual Resource Specialist)
The VRA Custom XMP Info Panel: How do I use it?

Jan Eklund (UC Berkeley, Business Systems Analyst, IST Data Services) and Chris Hoffman (UC Berkeley, Manager of Informatics Services, IST Data Services)
Deploying CollectionSpace for a VR Collection

Tom Moon (UCSB Library, Digitization Unit Manager)
Structuring Workflows: implementing new procedures without disruption

Lois McLean and Rick Tessman (McLean Media, Content Clips)
Content Clips, An Online Tool for Teaching with Digital Images

Dr. James Bartholomay Kiracofe (Director, Inter-American Institute for Advanced Studies in Cultural History)
Images for Education, On the road with an academic photographer

As well as a Plenary by the Visual Resources Association President, Maureen Burns (IMAGinED Consulting), Case Studies, tours and more!

Things to bring: flip-flops, laptops and business cards.
Please send questions to John Trendler <john.trendler@scrippscollege.edu>
We look forward to seeing you!

CALL FOR PRESENTERS: ACRL ARTS SECTION’S DISCUSSION FORUM

Are you doing research in the arts that you would like to share with fellow librarians? Is there something you’re doing at your library dealing with the arts that you think others should know about? Do you have a presentation you’d like to float by a group of friendly colleagues for some benevolent critique?

If so, the ACRL Arts section invites you to submit a presentation proposal for our Discussion Forum held on Saturday, June 25th from 10:30-12noon during the ACRL Annual Conference in New Orleans, LA.

Details:

–Proposals can be about any topic dealing with the visual or performing arts and design (see list of possible topics below).
–Everyone is welcome to submit a proposal. Students are also encouraged to make a submission.
–Each presentation will have 15-20 minutes with a 5 minute Q&A. We anticipate being able to accept 4-5 proposals for presentation.
–Proposals will be reviewed by a committee drawn from the Arts Section Executive Board and Publications & Research Committee.

Deadline: Please submit your proposals to Yen Tran (nttran@callutheran.edu), chair of the Arts Section’s Publications & Research Committee no later than May 27th. Those submitting proposals will be notified by June 3rd, as to whether or not your proposal was accepted for presentation.

Possible topics:

–Research of any topic related to the arts
–Developments in the display and/or preservation of arts materials
 –Innovative information literacy or visual literacy techniques with arts students
–Emerging technologies in arts libraries
–Inventive collection management and development in the arts
–Strategies for reaching out to arts users (students and faculty)
–Copyright and fair use in the arts environment
–Evaluating the needs of arts users
–Use of images in information literacy instruction
–Creative physical or online/virtual exhibits

The possibilities are endless; please consider submitting a proposal.

AIPH Library Overview

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INTRODUCING THE FLASCH DIGITAL LIBRARY

Introducing the JOAN FLASCH ARTISTS’ BOOK COLLECTION Digital Library

The John M. Flaxman Library at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago has recently introduced a new digital library interface for the Joan Flasch Artists’ Books Collection: http://digital-libraries.saic.edu/jfabc

The Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection includes close to 5,000 artists’ books, multiples, video and audio recordings, periodicals, digital works, reference books, ephemera, exhibition catalogs, and examples of experimental art practices, all created over the last four decades by artists of local, national, and international significance. Renowned and unique in its vast scope and easy accessibility the collection is housed in its own study room. Students, faculty, and the general public are welcome to drop in or to arrange in advance for formal presentations. The Flasch Collection also hosts readings, performances, seminars, and other campus events addressing the production, use, or context of experimental art practices.

The new JFABC Digital Library allows worldwide access to a growing catalog, provided for educational and research purposes. Powered by CONTENTdm software, it currently contains descriptions and discovery images for approximately a third of the items in the Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection, with more added continuously. A richly indexed online collection, the new catalog can be searched and browsed by criteria such as artists, titles, and terminology specific to our holdings. The site also includes a growing list of links to artists’ books resources world wide, as well as a calendar for exhibitions and events occurring in the book room.