ArLiSNAP is excited to welcome Rebecca Rubenstein as our new Social Media Liaison!

Rebecca will extend our discussions on Facebook and Twitter. Welcome to the group, Rebecca!

Rebecca

I am a painter and a librarian currently working with ebooks and multimedia research collections at an educational software company. I received an MFA from Pratt Institute and recently completed my MSLIS at the Palmer School of Library and Information Science, Long Island University. While at the Palmer School I interned with the Librarian for Fine Art at New York University’s Bobst Library. I also interned at a branch of the New York Public Library with a strong arts and exhibition program. This position led me to become a features writer for Library as Incubator Project where I continue to write about creative happenings in libraries.

A warm welcome to Hannah Marshall, our new Feature Writer/Discussion Liaison!

Hannah is joining us from VREPS to keep us up-to-date on special interests in art librarianship.

Marshall_photo

Hello, ArLiSNAPers – I am the Metadata Librarian for Image Collections at Cornell University. I started at Cornell as the art history image cataloger in April 2013 and, in January 2014, moved into my current role. In the past, I have worked in UC Irvine’s University Art Gallery, the San Diego Museum of Art Library, the Ricker Library of Architecture and Art, and the UIUC’s Visual Resource Center. I have additional experience working in an artist’s studio and in digital publishing. I have a B.A. in art history and completed my MLIS at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in Spring 2012. My professional experience and interests include a mixture of art librarianship, visual resource management, and image cataloging. I’m also very interested in research design and digitization projects. I look forward to writing for the blog and hopefully hearing from you all – thanks to Ellen and Rachel for the opportunity!

Survey Says

The Library Journal 2014 salary survey results are out.

There are several parts to the article, including a generic presentation of the data. There’s no breakdown by the type of materials the respondents work with, but there is categorization by position type (reference, instruction, metadata, etc.) and by institution type (public, academic, etc.). Personally, I fit into the “archives” and “other organization” slots (not to mention the “Canada / International” category) and there isn’t a ton of data to compare myself to. I seem to have the exact average salary. I guess that’s okay.

salary

I would like to take this opportunity to remind you of that discussion on the ARLIS-L listserv a few months back, about whether or not the art-librarianship niche has enough specific data to work from. Still hoping someone will take up this torch ….

(If you’re hurting for a research project for a class, this is something you should seriously consider.)

Meanwhile, there is a variety of advice offered in the LJ articles for new graduates, or the soon-to-graduate:

The graduating class of 2013 offered similar reactions to the job search as their colleagues from previous classes. Those who landed a job just prior to or shortly after graduation felt “fortunate”; others found it necessary to compromise in the type of job they sought. Graduates cited another year of “not enough experience for an entry-level position” and “a competitive pool of applicants.” Some advised those following in their footsteps to consider “second choice” options and “to be flexible” in approaching the range of jobs. One graduate suggested the second choice option might turn out to be the most fun.

I am curious to know, in the opinion of our illustrious audience, whether we at ArLiSNAP should post more jobs that are “second-choice”-style: graphic design / web development, project management, or other jobs in libraries and cultural institutions that aren’t specifically about visual resource management (take, for example, the job posts I put up this morning – lots of research and curation, which might be good experience, but aren’t specifically in this field).

I would also take this opportunity to link to the American Alliance of Museums’ salary survey results, but the link to the 2012 survey on this page seems to be broken. If you have useful salary resources, please share them with us in the comments!

A warm welcome to Arielle Cohen, our newest Feature Writer/Discussion Liaison!

Arielle will be joining us as a feature writer, informing us about topics of special interest.

Headshot

Having graduated from Pratt Institute’s School of Information and Library Science this past May, I now hold a Master’s degree in Library Science with a concentration in Special Libraries, as well as an advanced certificate in Archives. This past spring I also attended the 6th International Conference on Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries in Istanbul. While there, I presented a paper about the effect of digital resources on user experience, a topic in which I continued to be interested, especially as it relates to digital renderings of artworks.

Over the past few years I have had the opportunity to work in a variety of library settings, including the Pace Law School Library, the library at Marvel Comics, and the ABC No Rio Zine Library. Currently, I work as the librarian at Gagosian Gallery in New York City, where I catalog books, provide reference services, and assist in collection development. I am continually provided the opportunity to learn about the art world as I find resources and answer questions for staff members. However, I am essentially a solo librarian, so I look forward to being able to engage you, my fellow art librarians, both established and aspiring, in topics that are currently affecting art librarianship. Thank you to Ellen and Rachel for this opportunity, and I look forward to working with all of you!

Newsletter 007

arlisnapThe new issue of the ArLiSNAP Newsletter is here once again to catch you up on all the news and posts from the last week!

Receive our newsletter in your inbox every Monday by subscribing via the link below. Nominate yourself or an associate to be highlighted; keep up with ARLIS news and exhibits from around the world; jot down important events and upcoming deadlines; say your piece in one of the ArLiSNAP discussions; or view and apply for jobs you might have missed. Thanks for reading!

Newsletter 007: Aug. 18-24, 2014

Subscribe here!

The First-Ever NMC Horizon Report for Libraries

If you don’t know the New Media Consortium, you should: they’re doing great work in researching and predicting new technologies and trends in cultural heritage. (See their Museum Horizons report from late last year if you’re into 3D tech, interactivity, augmented reality using your mobile devices, etc.)

They’ve released a Horizons report for libraries, which is apparently their first! You’ll notice it’s for academic and research libraries, not necessarily public or special, but, baby steps. There are lots of interesting assessments of ongoing problems, like capturing digital records of research, keeping up with alternative research avenues, collaboration and embedded librarianship, etc.

If you want to check it out, I recommend looking at pages 20-21 for a quick discussion of embedded librarianship, incorporating literacy lessons into curricula, and how to collaborate with teachers to provide a more comprehensive education.

http://www.nmc.org/publications/2014-horizon-report-library

From the press release:

Lyon, France (August 20) — Today the New Media Consortium (NMC) in collaboration with the University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Chur, the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB), Hannover, and ETH-Bibliothek Zurich are releasing the NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition at a special session of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) World Library and Information Congress 80th General Conference and Assembly. This is the first edition of the NMC Horizon Report that delves into the realm of academic and research libraries in a global context.

 The report describes findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry. Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, giving library leaders and staff a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The format of the report was designed to provide these leaders with more in-depth insight into how the trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership, and practice.
“Education professionals across the world have used the higher education editions of the NMC Horizon Report for years as a springboard for discussion around important trends and challenges,” says Larry Johnson, Chief Executive Officer of the NMC and co-principal investigator for the project. “Finally we have been able to produce a report aimed directly at the needs of academic and research libraries – and what we have found is that academic and research libraries are leveraging new technology in some very important and creative ways.”
Key Trends Accelerating Technology Adoption for Academic and Research Libraries
The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition identifies “Increasing Focus on Research Data Management for Publications” and “Prioritization of Mobile Content and Delivery” as fast trends driving changes in academic and research libraries over the next one to two years. The “Evolving Nature of the Scholarly Record” and “Increasing Accessibility of Research Content” are mid-range trends expected to accelerate technology use in the next three to five years; and “Continual Progress in Technology, Standards, and Infrastructure” and the “Rise of New Forms of Multidisciplinary Research” are long-range trends that will be impacting libraries for five years and beyond.
“The trends identified by the expert panel indicate that libraries are doing a better job at making their content and research accessible, whether through mobile apps, enriched catalogs, linking data, and user friendly websites or by creating more spaces and opportunities for discovery,” notes Rudolf Mumenthaler, Professor for Library Science at HTW Chur and co-principal investigator for the report. “The outcomes of the report are very compelling and it is an honor for HTW Chur to be deeply involved in this project.”
Significant Challenges Impeding Technology Adoption In Academic and Research Libraries
A number of challenges are acknowledged for presenting barriers to the mainstream use of technology in academic and research libraries. “Embedding Academic and Research Libraries in the Curriculum” and “Rethinking the Roles and Skills of Librarians” are perceived as solvable challenges – those which we both understand and know how to solve. “Capturing and Archiving the Digital Outputs of Research as Collection Material” and “Competition from Alternative Avenues of Discovery” are considered difficult challenges, which are defined as well understood but with solutions that are elusive. Described as wicked challenges are “Embracing the Need for Radical Change” and “Maintaining Ongoing Integration, Interoperability, and Collaborative Projects,” which are complex to define, much less address.
“ETH-Bibliothek is proud to be a partner of this report,” shares Andreas Kirstein, Vice Director and Head of Media and IT Services at ETH-Bibliothek, and co-principal investigator of the project. “By articulating some of the most daunting challenges that academic and research libraries face, we are already making progress toward solving them.”
Important Developments in Technology for Academic and Research Libraries
Additionally, the report identifies “Electronic Publishing” and “Mobile Apps” as technologies expected to enter mainstream use in the first horizon of one year or less. “Bibliometrics and Citation Technologies” along with “Open Content” are seen in the second horizon of two to three years; “The Internet of Things” as well as “Semantic Web and Linked Data” are seen emerging in the third horizon of four to five years.
The subject matter in this report was identified through a qualitative research process designed and conducted by the NMC that engages an international body of experts in libraries, education, technology, research, business, and other fields around a set of research questions designed to surface significant trends and challenges and to identify emerging technologies with a strong likelihood of adoption in academic and research libraries. The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition details the areas in which these experts were in strong agreement.
“This first library edition of the Horizon Report marks some important evolutionary steps,” says Lambert Heller, head of Open Science Lab at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB), Hannover and co-principal investigator of the project. “Academic and research libraries are now being seen as incubators for experimenting with emerging technologies and are even leading the way at many university campuses across the world.”
The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition is available online, free of charge, and is released under a Creative Commons license to facilitate its widespread use, easy duplication, and broad distribution.

Newsletter 006

arlisnapThe new issue of the ArLiSNAP Newsletter is here once again to catch you up on all the news and posts from the last week!

Receive our newsletter in your inbox every Monday by subscribing via the link below. Nominate yourself or an associate to be highlighted; keep up with ARLIS news and exhibits from around the world; jot down important events and upcoming deadlines; say your piece in one of the ArLiSNAP discussions; or view and apply for jobs you might have missed. Thanks for reading!

Newsletter 006: Aug. 11-17, 2014

Subscribe here!

Newsletter 005

arlisnapThe new issue of the ArLiSNAP Newsletter is here once again to catch you up on all the news and posts from the last week! There were a TON of jobs posted this week, along with associated newsletter announcements, multiple calls for writing submissions, new liaison announcements, personal informative blog posts, and news about the quarterly chat. Simply read this weeks newsletter to consolidate all this fantastic information!

Newsletter 005: Aug. 4-10, 2014

Receive our newsletter in your inbox every Monday by subscribing via the link below. Nominate yourself or an associate to be highlighted; keep up with ARLIS news and exhibits from around the world; jot down important events and upcoming deadlines; say your piece in one of the ArLiSNAP discussions; or view and apply for jobs you might have missed. Thanks for reading!

Subscribe here!

Join us for this summer's Quarterly Chat!

ArLiSNAP Chat

On August 16th, 10:00am PST / 11:00am MST / 12:00pm CST / 1:00pm EST, ArLiSNAP liaisons and moderators will be meeting virtually to discuss plans for the group, make goals for the upcoming terms, and catch up on our activities this summer.

The agenda for this meeting includes…

  • ArLiSNAP hosting a mid-year webinar this winter: brainstorming session
  • Feedback and ideas for the ArLiSNAP Goals 2014-2015
  • Ideas for discussion posts and feature articles
  • Ideas for redesigning the ArLiSNAP blog and logo colours – what are our most important resources to highlight?

We welcome all readers who are interested in catching up with their fellow art librarian students/new professionals to join in on the chat! If you’ve ever thought about volunteering with ArLiSNAP, this is the perfect opportunity to get an idea of how we work together, and to have a say in the projects we take on. Email Ellen (ellen.j.tisdale(at)gmail(dot)com) if you would like to meet with us virtually next Saturday. If you’re unable to make it at that time, feel free to leave a comment on this post with any news you would like to share or issues you would like to see addressed.

Join us for this summer’s Quarterly Chat!

ArLiSNAP Chat

On August 16th, 10:00am PST / 11:00am MST / 12:00pm CST / 1:00pm EST, ArLiSNAP liaisons and moderators will be meeting virtually to discuss plans for the group, make goals for the upcoming terms, and catch up on our activities this summer.

The agenda for this meeting includes…

  • ArLiSNAP hosting a mid-year webinar this winter: brainstorming session
  • Feedback and ideas for the ArLiSNAP Goals 2014-2015
  • Ideas for discussion posts and feature articles
  • Ideas for redesigning the ArLiSNAP blog and logo colours – what are our most important resources to highlight?

We welcome all readers who are interested in catching up with their fellow art librarian students/new professionals to join in on the chat! If you’ve ever thought about volunteering with ArLiSNAP, this is the perfect opportunity to get an idea of how we work together, and to have a say in the projects we take on. Email Ellen (ellen.j.tisdale(at)gmail(dot)com) if you would like to meet with us virtually next Saturday. If you’re unable to make it at that time, feel free to leave a comment on this post with any news you would like to share or issues you would like to see addressed.