Northern California Chapter Spring Meeting on May 5th at SFMOMA Library!

The ARLIS/NA Northern California Chapter’s Spring meeting will be taking place at the SFMOMA Library in downtown San Francisco on Friday, May 5th.

The tentative schedule is:

  • 10:00-11:00 AM – ARLIS/NA Northern California Chapter business meeting
  • 11:00-11:30 AM – Break and Library tour
  • 11:30 AM-12:30 PM – Forum on Artists’ Ephemera
    • John Held, Jr., mail artist, author, performance artist and former librarian, will talk about Steven Leiber and his influence on the acceptance of artistic ephemera, and Tanya Zimbardo, Assistant Curator of Media Arts at SFMOMA, will discuss curating artists’ ephemera at SFMOMA. Followed by Q&A and open discussion.
  • 12:30-1:30 PM – Lunch on your own
  • 1:30 PM – Explore SFMOMA galleries

Visit https://arlisnanc.blogspot.com/ for details.

Contact Christina Moretta, Chair, or Abby Dansiger, Vice Chair/Chair-Elect, at adansiger@famsf.org with any questions.

Twitter chat: #critlib on Visual Literacy, May 17th at 9pm EST

visual culture/literacy

Tomorrow night, join us on Twitter at #critlib to talk about visual culture and literacy for librarians. You’ll need a Twitter account to participate, but not to observe. (And you can wait a few days until someone storifies the tweets if you want to read them later in a more functional chronological display.)

I’ll be in transit during most of the chat but I hope to pop in. (As you may recall, I have some opinions about visual literacy in the digital age.)

The Canadian Library Association is dissolving

The Canadian Library Association (CLA) has proposed to its members that it formally dissolve and renew its #brand as a federation of the provincial and territorial associations. If you’re at all interested in Canadian libraries and organizational politics, transparency, or advocacy, you might like to read the proposal here:

http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Home&TEMPLATE=/CM/ContentDisplay.cfm&CONTENTID=17394

Imagine if the ALA found itself unsustainable? What would that even be like?

Free Lecture/Webcast: Rick Prelinger Speaks at the Toronto Internation Film Festival Centre

TIFF Higher Learning presents:

*Reel Heritage – Rick Prelinger on The Future of Memory
<http://tiff.net/fall2015-series/higher-learning-fall-2015/higher-learning-reel-heritage-rick-prelinger-on-the-future-of-memory>*

*Friday October 23, 11am12:30pm EST*

In recent years, traditional moving-image archives have faced challenges
from the dramatic shift towards digital production and distribution, the
effective end of photochemical preservation technology, the marginalization
of the theatrical viewing experience, and the public demand for universal,
instant and free access to media. In this public talk, Rick Prelinger,
Founder of the Prelinger Archives and Associate Professor of Film & Digital
Media at UC Santa Cruz, sets out a number of possible visions for the
future of archives, and discusses some of the innovations that many
cultural heritage institutions have already begun to experiment with today.

Rick Prelinger founded Prelinger Archives in 1982. This collection of
60,000 advertising, educational, industrial and amateur films is now held
by Library of Congress. In 2000 he collaborated with Internet Archive to
build an open-access, freely downloadable digital moving-image collection
that now contains over 6,500 titles. He has made seventeen urban history
compilation films and two experimental feature films that have played at
venues around the world. He currently is a professor of film and digital
media at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

*Watch the live stream:* tiff.net/reelheritage

*Attend in-person:* Tickets are free and are available two hours before the
event’s start time at the Steve & Rashmi Gupta Box Office at TIFF Bell
Lightbox, located at Reitman Square, 350 King Street West.

This event is part of TIFF’s Reel Heritage initiative, an on-going series
of educational sessions dedicated to the access to and management of moving
image collections in Ontario and beyond. Through panel discussions,
workshops, film screenings and networking sessions, Reel Heritage will
bring together scholars, archivists, filmmakers, curators, and
postsecondary students to examine the opportunities and challenges faced by
both large moving image collections and smaller repositories, such as those
found in regional archives and small libraries.

This event will also be added to Higher Learning Digital Resource Hub
<http://www.tiff.net/education/events> for the benefit of postsecondary
students, faculty and practitioners.

ARLIS/NA New England’s “Virtual Snapshot: What’s up with Art librarianship?” webinar on 11/9/15

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The Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA), New England Chapter invites you to join us for a virtual tour of the art library/visual resources profession on Monday, November 9, 7:30 pm – 8:45 pm EST.
Whether you’re an art library veteran, art library-curious, or somewhere in between this will be an illuminating look at some of the exciting work happening in the field. ARLIS/NA or regional chapter membership is not required for attendance.
To register for this free event, please visit: http://bit.ly/1RFtEnH. Note that the webinar meeting space will open at 7 pm EST, and the official event start time is 7:30 pm EST.
Speakers and topics include:
Jesi Buell, Instructional Design and Web Librarian, Colgate University
Information and Visual Literacy Instruction Tools
Digital Learning Objects (DLOs) are examples of a successful Blended Learning tool at Colgate University. These interactive, digital tutorials allow for student learning outside the classroom which increases time in Library sessions, put lessons in context, and encourages autodidactism. This presentation will show examples, give advice on best practices, and explain how the Instructional Design Librarian plans on putting together a visual literacy DLO.
Jasmine Burns, Image Technologies and Visual Literacy Librarian, Indiana University Bloomington
Visual Resource Collection Management
During this presentation, I will discuss my plans for a large data migration from a homegrown institutional image repository (created by my predecessor in the mid-1990s) into ARTstor’s SharedShelf. I will give a background of the structure and uses of current system, map out my overall migration plan, and share my projected timeline for the process.
Sarah Carter, Director, Bridwell Art Library at the University of Louisville
Creative Outreach and Programming
The Bridwell Art Library connected the artistic practice of self portraits to a wider audience by designing and implementing a social media campaign highlighting “Shelfies in Art History.” This presentation will focus on the collaborative exhibit design and promotion that made the exhibit and social media campaign a success with not only our patrons, but within the wider community of Louisville.
Lareese Hall, Architecture + Art Librarian, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Artists’ Book Collections
If you had to use just six books in your artists’ book collection to explain your collection philosophy what would you choose? This is the premise for a video series that looks at artists’ books in academic environments and at what it means to “collect”.
The presentations will be followed by some Q&A time.
If you’re never attended a webinar before or would like assistance with the technical logistics, please don’t hesitate to reach out.
Hope to see you on 11/9!
Sincerely,
Ashley Peterson (ARLIS/NA NE Chapter President)
Amber Welch (ARLIS/NA NE Chapter Secretary)
Webinar Co-Moderators

News from the Off-Season: some conference cogitations

Happy February!

I’ve just gotten back to work after a five-day weekend. Three of those days were spent at the Ontario Library Association Super Conference, here in Toronto, so, not exactly a vacation, but definitely a change from the 9-5.

Besides a ton of useful tech sessions (including on OpenRefine for data cleaning, Koha [an open-source cataloguing system], and a review of the Google Art Project by some local ARLIS/NA student chapter members), this conference is basically the Canadian answer to ALA and draws 5,000 registrants.

Speaking of, ALA Midwinter happened this past weekend as well, with roughly the same numbers flocking to Chicago. They had Jason Segel as a keynote speaker, while we had Welcome to Night Vale. It’s a toss-up, really.

ALA, of course, being that body that accredits those programs we’re taking, has measurably more weight in the profession. They’re neck-deep in campaigns for governing positions, including someone that champions lowering the admission rates to MLIS/MI programs to compensate for the underemployment problem, and someone who thinks librarians are “the best profession in the world.” Sigh. (You can see the debate recording here.) If you’re an ALA member, I strongly suggest you vote in the elections.

A hot topic in both conferences was the new information literacy standards being passed by the ACRL — or, rather, the Framework, as the new concepts are being billed. I did some ranting about this subject a while ago, but I’ll remind you that the ACRL Visual Literacy Standards from 2011 were built upon those original IL standards, which means we should expect a VL-specific interpretation of the Framework in the near future. I have been trying to mull over what those will entail, but, it’s been a busy winter so far. I’d love to hear about your ideas, in the comments! (My first guess is going to be a threshold concept of “the realization that you’re committing copyright infringement basically every time you go online.”)

Meanwhile, back in Toronto, I was finding that quite a few of the conference sessions I attended were hard-pressed to name an audience: a curious newbie, or a field specialist? Even sessions with “current trends” in the titles spent the majority of their time rehashing the basics. I definitely valued the technology demonstrations, and the guides to cataloguing in certain metadata schemes, but I think I’m too niche in my interests to find the bulk of presentations at big library conferences to be worthwhile. And some of the most interesting sessions happened concurrently, so I couldn’t sit in on the session on 3D printing and copyright without missing that Google Art Project discussion down the hall.

But on the upside, I got these awesome socks:

“Due Date Card” Library Socks from Out of Print

Please welcome Hilary Price to the ArLiSNAP team as our newest Job Postings Liaison / Feature Writer!

Hilary will be keeping us up-to-date on employment opportunities in the art librarianship field. Welcome! archivephoto Hi.  I’ve used ArLiSNAP since I began my MLS in 2013 and I’m so excited to be on the team.  Before I decided to pursue my MLS at Queens College, I studied art history at The New School, and fine art at Tyler School of Art.  While I still love making and looking at art, I’m excited about connecting people with resources as a librarian and archivist. In the spring semester I will graduate with my MLS, but in the meantime, I’ll be working part-time at three different libraries in New York.  I’ll continue my work as graduate fellow at Barnard Archives and Special Collections, begin a project assistant position at the Brooklyn Museum Library, and get a taste of the corporate archive world at the Citi Center for Culture (archive of Citibank).  My interests and studies are primarily directed toward archives, new technologies, and art librarianship. Thanks to Ellen and Rachel for all their work, and for giving me the opportunity to assist.  I look forward to posting.

A Bit of Holiday Reading

If you’re like me, you’re working over the holidays. Beyond my few in-office days this week, I’ve got a handful of volunteer projects to complete or plan before the new year, some conference presentations to start on (hello pie charts!), and multiple folders of PDFs to read on my desktop. I might even spend a few hours tweaking the ArLiSNAP redesign! (More about this later.)

If you’re not like me, you’re probably visiting with family and friends, flipping the channels on the TV, sleeping in, and otherwise loafing. Lucky you. But you might still want to catch up on your reading, do something professional-development-related, or polish off a personal project. With most regularly-publishing websites on a hiatus until the end of the year, allow me to recommend some media archives to check out if you want to keep your head in librarian-land:

Long-Forms

The Digitization Age: Mass Culture is Quality Culture. An overview of EU digitization initiatives and their impact on cultural access. (PDF)

A Season of Life in the LAC. A speech by the relatively new head of cultural heritage in Canada, Guy Berthiaume, discussing the pitiful state of our priorities challenges and opportunities we face.

An interview with Sarah Thornton, author of a new book of collected interviews with artists. Full disclosure: I got both of her books from the library and couldn’t get into either of them. But you might succeed where I have failed!

A history of the war between Amazon and the book industry.

Do we really need a Whole Foods of contemporary art? And does commercialization ever equate to democratization?

Listen/Watch

Circulating Ideas: A podcast series interviewing librarians, including a DAM expert and the director of the DPLA.

You can use your ARLIS/NA membership to access the webinar recording on library advocacy from a few weeks back.

Twitter!

Librarian Twitter Chats

VRA / ARLIS members on Twitter

I’ve only recently become a convert to Twitter, and have found it surprisingly great for networking. I didn’t take my LIS in Toronto, although I work here now, so it’s been pretty good for meeting colleagues and filling the support gap where my classmates might’ve been. I’ve been following public chats like #critlib, #SLAtalk, and #snapRT, and looking for good art-related conversations as well. (Feel free to suggest some if you know of any.) Most of these chats will be suspended over the holidays, but it’s a good time to go back and read older discussions on topics of interest (especially if someone was nice enough to storify them!).

Eye Candy

The Tate put a ton of artists’ archival content online.

The Public Domain Class of 2015. Several artists entering the public domain, including Kandinsky, Mondrian, and Munch.

And, when you’re in the midst of holiday-related stress, don’t forget you can punch a Monet.

New Chapter Name: ARLIS/NA Mid-Atlantic Chapter

*please excuse cross-postings*

Many of you are already aware of this but the ARLIS/NA DC-MD-VA Chapter is now the ARLIS/NA Mid-Atlantic Chapter! Our name change was approved earlier this year.  This puts us into alignment with chapters from other professional organizations and allows us to strongly welcome those from the now defunct Delaware Valley Chapter. We look forward to holding a meeting north of Maryland in the near future.

We were a little busy with the DC conference this year, but we have now switched our names in the appropriate places and have a redesigned website: http://arlisnamidatlantic.org/ . Many thanks to Chapter Officers Tessa Brawley-Barker, Roger Lawson, and Nick Curotto on completing all these detailed tasks.

I would also like to remind ARLIS/NA members that you can purchase ARLIS/NA related items on our Cafe Press site: http://www.cafepress.com/arlis . All proceeds from the shop go towards the Chapter’s Caroline Backlund Professional Development Travel Award.

Finally, if anyone is near DC later this month, you are welcome to attend our holiday party at Past President Gregg Most’s house. Details here: http://arlisnamidatlantic.org/meetings/upcoming-meetings/chapter-fundraising-party-december-18-2014/

It’s been a wonderful 2014! Looking forward to seeing you all in Fort Worth in 2015!

Heather Slania

Director of the Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center

ARLIS/NA Mid-Atlantic Chapter Chair

National Museum of Women in the Arts

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