A Compendium of Archivists Talk About Their First Professional Publishing Experience

The SNAP Roundtable blog just published a great roundup of mid-career archivists discussing their routes to publication, all through grad-school term papers or essay awards. As I’ve written about this previously, obviously I feel like these perspectives are good to have.

https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/2015/12/17/on-the-job-training-publishing/

Survey: Canadian LIS students, grads, and hiring staff on transition to academic librarianship

Please check out the following survey and see if you qualify! The research is on MLIS students, recent graduates, and hiring librarians and managers at Canadian academic institutions. (This is reposted from a listserv.)

Dear LIS colleagues,

 

This email is to invite you to participate in a research study exploring the transition between LIS education and employment in academic libraries.

 

Our study seeks to examine how students are prepared for and what challenges exist when transitioning from LIS to a career in academic librarianship. Our findings will help contribute to Canadian LIS literature and provide recommendations to LIS programs and employers to help support the successful transition from school to employment.

 

The survey will remain open until July 28, 2014. Please distribute this email widely.

 

Eligible participants include:

·         Current students enrolled in a Master of Library and Information Studies, or directly equivalent, program at a Canadian university. Students can be pursuing part-time or full-time studies. Participants in this category must have completed approximately 50 percent of their program and have an intention or interest in pursuing a career in academic librarianship.

·         Recent graduates who have completed a Master of Library and Information Studies, or directly equivalent, program at a Canadian university within the last year (graduated no earlier than April 2013) and are actively seeking employment at a Canadian academic library.

·         New professionals who have completed a Master of Library and Information Studies, or directly equivalent, program at a Canadian university within the last three years (graduated no earlier than April 2011). Participants in this category are recent graduates who are currently employed full- or part-time, either on a permanent or contract basis, at a Canadian academic library.

·         Hiring managers or librarians who participate in hiring committees at any Canadian academic library, in any discipline, on either a contract or permanent basis. Librarians involved in other elements of the hiring process and supervisors of new professionals are also encouraged to participate.

 

If you have any questions, please, contact either Laura Thorne by phone at (250) 807-9107 or by email at laura.thorne@ubc.ca or Catherine McGoveran by phone at (613) 562-5800 ext. 2725 or by email at catherine.mcgoveran@uottawa.ca.

 

Survey data is being collected via Verint, a survey tool provided by UBC IT. Verint is a Canadian-hosted survey solution complying with the BC Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. All data is stored and backed up in Canada.

 

This study is being conducted in English; however, should a participant require assistance to participate, the researchers will endeavour to provide this assistance wherever possible.

 

When completed, the researchers will seek to publish the results of the study. If you would like a copy of the research findings, please send a request to either Laura Thorne by phone at (250) 807-9107 or by email at laura.thorne@ubc.caor Catherine McGoveran by phone at (613) 562-5800 ext. 2725 or by email at catherine.mcgoveran@uottawa.ca.

 

To participate in our study, please follow the link: http://www.surveyfeedback.ca/surveys/wsb.dll/s/1g336c

 

Thank you for your support,

Laura Thorne & Catherine McGoveran

 

Laura Thorne

Learning Services Librarian, UBC Okanagan Campus Library

The University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus

(250) 807-9127

laura.thorne@ubc.ca

 

Catherine McGoveran

Bibliothécaire spécialisée en information gouvernementale / Government Information Librarian

Centre d’information GSG Information Centre ; Bibliothèque Morisset Library

Université d’Ottawa / University of Ottawa

(613) 562-5800 ext./poste 2725

catherine.mcgoveran@uottawa.ca

Summer Study Abroad Course: “Follow the Fringe”

Summer Study Abroad Course: “Follow the Fringe”, 2nd Season.  Application period closes February 14.  Space is limited!.

The University of Maryland, College of Information Studies, Maryland’s iSchool, announces a Study Abroad course offering this summer.  Directed by Mary Edsall Choquette, iSchool faculty, the course, “Follow the Fringe: Documentation and Preservation of Cultural Movements in Media,” offers 12 students the opportunity to travel to Scotland and participate in the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2014.

The course introduces students to the fundamentals of archival documentation and preservation of, and access to, performance activity information.  It specifically focuses on documentation and preservation of movement phenomena performed at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2014.  Students will research and follow a performance group from the CalArts Festival Theater Summer Program, California Institute of the Arts, which has participated in the Edinburgh Festival for11 years.

The Festival Fringe in Edinburgh is the oldest performance festival of its type.  While several “fringe festivals” now happen in cities in the United States, the Edinburgh festival is the mother of all and has the historical elements making it most worthy of initial research and practical experience.  It provides a unique experience to investigate strategies for documentation of performance phenomena and the creation of archives, adding to the history of the event.

Building on a model for live performance documentation and preservation created by Dr. Choquette, students will plan a documentation strategy specific to this project; implement that strategy; collect the resulting media and data in a digital archive; and place the digital archive in a shared repository in Edinburgh, at CalArts, and at the University of Maryland.  Students will also create metadata for access purposes.

Students will live and work for 2 weeks in the heart of Edinburgh, among thousands of people performing and working at the festival as well as audience participants and the residents of the city.  This provides a unique experience of living in a city being lit by culture 24/7 during the 2-week stay.

Students will be exposed to real life in Scotland through tours of libraries and archives, and independent touring experiences and will be exposed to the world of festival culture through practical experiences; by living among festival participants; and through audience activities.  Students will blog regularly and tweet daily about their experiences; resulting data will be included in the digital archive.

Throughout these various experiences, students will document and collect found cultural information and will collectively produce a digital “Movement Mash-up Mural” upon return from Scotland.  The Mural will be premiered at a public event at Maryland’s iSchool.

This course directly relates to the iSchool’s mission of engaging in collaborative and innovative research, teaching, and service.  It also responds to the iSchool’s vision of transforming the way individuals, organizations, and communities connect with information.  The course also reflects the iSchool’s commitment to diversity and community across cultures.

The schedule for the course is as follows:

Start date*:  7/15/2014
Date of departure from US: 7/27/2014
Earliest return date: 8/10/2014
End date*: 8/19/2014
*On campus workshop dates TBA.

For more information on the  “Follow the Fringe” course and to apply for admission, please see the online course brochure:
https://myea.umd.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=10836

Questions can also be directed to Mary Edsall Choquette:  mechoque@umd.edu

Are you Library Management Material?

role-of-Managers

Although it might seem to many of us, while students, that library management is something to consider years from now, if ever, it might be worth a second thought during your MLIS program. If you have been in library school any length of time, you are bound to have picked up on something like “a shortage of qualified library leaders is coming, so get ready!” While this may or may not be true, it is entirely within the realm of possibility that some of us will eventually be library managers. With the proliferation of educational tracks and certificate programs, choosing one is sometimes a daunting prospect. What would entice you to choose a Library Management emphasis over others?

Maybe the answer lies in taking stock of your personality, skills, abilities, and goals. For me personally, Management Studies is ideal. I LOVED 5300: Library and Information Center Management. I reveled in topics like Strategic Planning, Organizational Culture, Human Resource Management, Ethics, and Development/Fundraising. Of course, maybe this has something to do with the fact that I have had some management experience and can envision myself in a leadership role readily. Or maybe it’s simply that I like being in charge!

What about you? Can you picture yourself in a management role of some kind? Do you think the administrative side of the job would perhaps overshadow your primary objectives as a librarian? Yes or no?

 

 

Professional development- opportunities abound!

As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great conferences, CFPs, scholarships and more opportunities below!

Deadline to register is Tuesday, October 30, 2012

 The Next Chapter: Rare Books in Modern Times

Presented by the Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts

November 13 & 14, 2012

Philadelphia, PA

Hosted and co-sponsored by:

American Philosophical Society

Millions of books are contained in 21st-century libraries, museums, archives, and special collections. Those defined as rare may be historically significant, scarce, unusual or innovative in format, or otherwise unique. The evolution from handwritten text to printed volume and digital page is indicative of cultural and intellectual growth and parallels improvements in the use and care of books. The book in modern times is a source of knowledge and a work of art. This two-day program will explore the definition of the rare book within the context of its physical history and current preservation concerns. Presenters will also address ways to engage the public with rare book collections in conservation work and exhibition planning.

Topics will include:

* Identification and description of historical bindings

* Preservation priorities and conservation issues for rare books in the digital age

* Digitization selection

* Objectives in targeting volumes for conservation treatment

* Rare book exhibition planning and interpretation

Program Fees:

$225 CCAHA members

$250 Non-members

Registration Deadline: Tuesday, October 30, 2012

More information about this program and online registration is available atwww.ccaha.org/education/program-calendar. Major funding for this program was generously provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), with additional support from The Pew Charitable Trusts, the Independence Foundation, and the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.

CFP: ALCTS PARS Digital Preservation Interest Group at 2013 ALA Midwinter Meeting

The ALCTS PARS Digital Preservation Interest Group invites speakers to participate at the Digital Preservation Interest Group session at the ALA Midwinter Meeting in Seattle on Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013 from 8:30-10:00 AM.

The mission of the ALCTS PARS Digital Preservation Interest Group is to serve as a venue for discussing the preservation management of digital assets whether commercial, born-digital or converted from analog formats.

Presentation topics should be of current interest to technical services librarians, preservation librarians, digital librarians, and archivists.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

-Digital preservation planning

-Digital preservation of special formats such as social media, digital humanities projects, websites, research data, email, etc.

-Digital preservation tools and systems

-Collaborative digital preservation efforts

-Digital preservation strategies such as format migration, replication, or emulation

-Digital preservation best practices

-Trusted Digital Repository certification

-The economics of digital preservation

-Training for digital preservation job responsibilities

-Digital preservation challenges

-Digital preservation success or failure stories

Presentations should be approximately 15-20 minutes in length. Additional time will be allowed for questions and discussion.

Please send abstracts of proposals to co-chairs by Friday, Nov. 9, 2012. If you have questions, please contact us. We look forward to hearing from you!

Digital Preservation Interest Group Co-Chairs:

Sibyl Schaefer

Assistant Director, Head of Digital Programs, Rockefeller Archive Center

SSchaefer@rockarch.org

Meghan Banach Bergin

Coordinator, Bibliographic Access and Metadata Unit, University of Massachusetts Amherst

mbanach@library.umass.edu

Proposals are due by November 1, 2012

The Association of Architecture School Librarians holds its annual meeting in conjunction with the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. Our 2013 Conference will take place in San Francisco, CA from March 21-24, 2013 at the Grand Hyatt Union Square.

The AASL 2013 Conference Planning Committee is requesting proposals for two Special Focus Panels to be held Friday, March 22, 2013; the first will be a one-hour session for a series of up to 7 lightning talks (not more than six minutes long, not more than 15 slides) on topics pertinent to architectural librarianship. The second session (1.5 hours) will host three panelists and focus on academic topics(15 minute long presentations).

Lightning Talk Proposals

Lightning talks, also known as Pecha Kucha, encourage presenters to focus on the essential elements of their topic. Themes suggested after last year’s conference include: library participation in the Solar Decathlon, promoting print collections in an e-resource world, developing a green building materials collection, cooperative collection development, new sustainability resources, and for-credit courses in information literacy.

While these topics all merit longer presentations, the six-minute time limit allows the presenter to use visual media to convey his/her message and to focus on only the essential elements of the talk, hopefully promoting discussion after the presentations. There is also little risk that the talk will be boring.

AASL Conference participants interested in presenting a lightning talk, should send a one-paragraph description including proposed title and the speaker’s name and affiliation to David Eifler (deifler@berkeley.edu) by November 1, 2012. The 2013 Conference Committee will review all proposals and will inform applicants of selection decisions by December 1, 2012.

Academic Panel Proposals

Taking cue from the theme of the ACSA 101th Annual Meeting, AASL academic panelists will use the idea of New Constellations/New Ecologies as their starting point.

Panel topics should address ways in which architecture is responding / has responded (or not) to the accelerated rate of change in our culture and environment. Panelists may choose as broad or narrow approach as they see fit as long as they can properly make their argument in the allotted time. They can address or draw from any aspect of architectural practice, theory, history or education.

Possible topics include:

megalopolises, mega-regions

crossdisciplinarity or blurring the boundaries – in and out of architecture

global/local

community-based design

environmental, cultural, technological, or demographic change and its impact on architecture or architectural education

The Academic Panel will allow for three 15-minute presentations and ample time for questions and discussion.

AASL Conference participants may submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to Martha González Palacios (martha.gonzalez@austin.utexas.edu) by November 1, 2012. Abstracts should explain the connection of the chosen topic to ACSA 101’s theme, summarize the argument to be presented and include the proposed title and speaker’s name and affiliation. The 2013 Conference Committee will review all proposals and will inform presenter of selection decisions by December 1, 2012.

Call for Applications: ARLIS/NA Gerd Muehsam Award

The Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) is accepting applications for the Gerd Muehsam Award. This award is given annually for a student paper or web project focused on a topic relevant to art librarianship or visual curatorship. Current students and recent graduates in library studies, art history, museum studies, and studio art are eligible to apply.

The deadline for applications is November 30, 2012.

For detailed information about the award and application instructions please see the ARLIS/NA web site: http://www.arlisna.org/about/awards/muehsam_info.html

 The Program Committee is now accepting proposals for Posters for the 41st annual ARLIS/NA conference to be held in Pasadena, CA from April 25-29, 2012. The deadline for Poster Session proposals is Friday, November 16, 2012.

A Poster Session is the presentation of a topic or research both visually and through direct interaction with conference attendees at a table. This format encourages one on one discussion and self-paced viewing. Posters may include projects, works in process, and other topics of interest to conference attendees.

To submit a Poster Session proposal for the Pasadena conference please click the link below and complete the online submission form:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ARLISNA-Posters

The ARLIS/NA-VRAF Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management will be held from June 18-June 21, 2013 at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor.

The members of the collaborative SEI 2013 Implementation Team are:

Amy Trendler (Ball State University), SEI Co-Chair for ARLIS/NA; Betha Whitlow (Washington University), SEI Co-Chair for the VRAF; Meghan Musolff (University of Michigan-Ann Arbor), SEI Faculty Liaison and Incoming Co-Chair for the VRAF; Rebecca Price (University of Michigan-Ann Arbor), Local Arrangements Chair; Karen Kessel (Sonoma State University), SEI Curriculum Specialist; Ian McDermott (ArtStor), SEI Curriculum Specialist; Adrianna Stephenson (Southern Methodist University), SEI Development Lead; Emily Lemieux (Williams College), SEI Webmaster.

The SEI 2013 website, with a full program and details of the institute, will go live in early December 2012, and registration will begin on January 22, 2013. The SEI is a proven and popular program and fills up each year, so be sure to register early to insure your place. In the meantime, if you have questions about SEI 2013, please contact SEI Co-Chair Betha Whitlow (bwhitlow[at]wustl[dot]edu) or SEI Co-Chair Amy Trendler (aetrendler[at]bsu[dot]edu).

ANNOUNCING: A NEW TRAINING Program for scholars, conservators, archivists and researchers in the Use of Reflectance Transformation imaging (RTI) for Documenting ancient texts and artifacts including the Loan of Imaging Equipment.

The University of Southern California’s West Semitic Research Project

(www.usc.edu/dept/LAS/wsrp) has received grants from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to establish a Training Program in advanced imaging technologies for the documentation of ancient texts and artifacts with an initial emphasis on Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI). The IMLS and the Mellon Foundation have also funded the purchase of imaging equipment to support the Training Program.

The objective of this project is to develop an infrastructure for training scholars, conservators, archivists and researchers in the use of RTI technology and subsequently to lend the necessary imaging equipment to participants in the training program so they can do an initial RTI documentation project either in field environments (archaeological sites, etc.) or in libraries, museums and/or other similar venues, worldwide. This initial undertaking should be understood to be a pilot project that can develop into an ongoing, broader documentary effort and preferably may also serve as the catalyst for establishing a consortial network for image documentation of a given corpus (or corpora) of ancient texts and/or artifacts. All equipment to be lent out is both rugged and compact and is thus ideal for doing sophisticated imaging in remote locations. Twenty-four awards over three years (approximately eight per year) for traineeships will be provided based on the merit and intrins ic importance of a proposed pilot imaging project as well as the appropriateness of the subject matter for RTI imaging.

For more information, see http://www.usc.edu/dept/LAS/wsrp/Training_Program.pdf

or contact Marilyn Lundberg (mlundber@usc.edu) or Bruce Zuckerman (bzuckerm@usc.edu).

Knowledge Transfer Partnership

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KTP at LCC (UAL) and Bridgeman Education.flv

Really interesting partnership between Bridgeman Art Library & the London College of Communication, University of the Arts London. Made me wonder if the upcoming VRA + ARLIS/NA conference session, “Paving the Way for an Uncertain Future,” will discuss partnerships.

LIS Scholarships from the Georgia Library Association

[via GLA listserv]

Do you know someone in an LIS program or entering an LIS program?  Tell them about the GLA Scholarships!

The Georgia Library Association awards two (2) scholarships yearly to provide financial assistance toward completing a Master’s in Library/Information Science.

The Hubbard Scholarship ($3,000) was established over 30 years ago to recruit excellent librarians for Georgia.

The Beard Scholarship ($1,000) intended for those who show strong potential to inspire and motivate their peers in the profession.

Scholarships are open to students accepted to master’s degree programs at ALA accredited schools (whether currently enrolled or beginning studies in Fall 2010). Recipients agree to work for one year in a Georgia library following graduation. For full requirements and application info please visit http://gla.georgialibraries.org/scholarship.htm

Deadline: May 21

Online Visual Information Class at University of Rhode Island – Summer 2009

If you are interested in meeting challenges in our profession, explore beyond the textual information world, and take a course at the pace of your time and space anytime and anywhere, have you thought about taking LSC544 Visual
Information Science this summer? It will be a complete WebCT course in 10 weeks this summer starting from May 19 to July 21st hosted by University of Rhode Island.

Course Title: LSC544 Visual Information Science
Dates and Time: Thursday, 6:30 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. from May 19- July 21. The time is set as a deadline for posting assignments purposes. I will post all answers or necessary class materials by the specified class time.  You do not need to be at your computers during the designated class-time. You can be anywhere and anytime to take this course as long as you have access to the Internet.
Format: WebCT (No face to face meetings. No chat-room discussions).

Instructor: Professor Yan Ma

What Does LSC544 Cover?
With the proliferation of visual information in our daily lives, the need to incorporate the studies of visual information and visual literacy into the curriculum is one of the most pressing tasks. Our efforts in the past have been focused on textual information. How about visual information at this visual information age? That is the challenge to all of us and our profession. LSC544 will provide you with an exciting opportunity to examine visual information science issues.

LSC544 Visual Information Science will cover the following topics:
1. Study the nature of information in textual and visual forms. 

2. Study the interdisciplinary nature of visual information science.

3. Study information and visual information and communications theories.

4. Understand and analyze needs and uses for both textual and visual information. User information seeking behavior for both textual and visual information.

5. Discuss information policy, intellectual property, and copyright for both textual and visual information.

6. Understand the theory and practice of information storage and retrieval systems for both textual and visual information.

7. Understand and study issues relating to user interface design.

8. Explore information technology for visual information science

9. Study research methods for textual and visual information.

10. Become familiar with important journals, books, and authors.
Summer Registration
http://www.uri.edu/summer

If you are interested in taking this course, please email Dr. Ma for the course syllabus. Email: yanma@uri.edu

Thank you! I hope to you in the class!
–Yan Ma