Hack Your MLIS Program: Visual Resources Librarianship

Hi Arlisnappers! After a yearlong absence, I am back on the blog as a feature post writer and excited to be a part of the ArLiSNAP team once again. I recently graduated with my MLIS and I currently work as the Director of Visual Resources at the University of Georgia.

In April 2014, I shared my tips for hacking your MLIS program to focus on art librarianship. Now I’m back with a better-late-than-never follow-up on how I hacked my MLIS program to prepare for my career in visual resources librarianship. We have discussed how to plan your coursework so you are prepared to manage digital collections before, and this post will focus specifically on what you need to manage visual resources collections.

Visual Resources Center, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia. Image courtesy of Courtney Baron.
Visual Resources Center, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia. Image courtesy of Courtney Baron.

What is visual resources librarianship?

Visual resources librarianship is a bit different from art librarianship, though the two fields require similar skills and educational backgrounds. I have worked as a full-time visual resources professional for one year now, so I have a good idea of what the profession involves and what is required to do the job successfully. That being said, each position is unique depending on the needs of the institution. Visual resources professionals historically functioned as slide librarians, usually in art/art history departments or libraries. Now, we primarily manage digital image collections, though slide collections still exist at many institutions, and assist faculty and students with their image needs. We may also manage public visual resources spaces that range from digital scanning and projects labs to libraries with circulating materials.

Become involved in VRA

The Visual Resources Association (VRA) is smaller than ARLIS, but equally as welcoming. Hands down, this is the best way to get – and stay – connected to the field, especially if you are one of the few people in your program interested in art and visual resources librarianship. Not only do you have access to a large network of art and visual resources professionals, but you can also follow news, concerns, and trends on the VRA listserv. I encourage you to be active on the listserv as well since name recognition can help you in your job search later on! Seriously – my predecessor was very active, and I get asked about him all the time. If you have been involved with ARLIS but haven’t yet ventured into VRA, there is a joint conference next year in Seattle, WA, so it will be an opportune time to check out both organizations and annual conferences. There is also a similar group to ArLiSNAP called vreps – visual resources association emerging professionals and students – that you should join. The VRA Bulletin is the journal of the association and each issue contains a wealth of information about current issues and practices in the field.

Focus coursework and projects on visual resources topics

As I said in part one, the best way to ensure you are getting a similar education to a MLIS program that does offer an art librarianship track is to see which courses they require and which electives they offer. I also recommend looking at similar tracks, such as digital content/asset management or archives. I recommend courses on the following topics, since they relate to visual resources: humanities information services, digital libraries, descriptive cataloging and metadata, database design, digital humanities, and digital archives. Basically, looks for classes that focus on metadata, technologies, databases, and managing or curating digital archives, libraries, and other collections. These classes will give you an overview of the information you need and you can focus your projects and papers specifically on arts and humanities topics.

Independent study

In part one, I discussed an independent study on art and visual resources librarianship that I designed as an elective in my MLIS program. If you would like more information on that, I’m happy to share my syllabus and course projects in a later post.

This time, I’m focusing on what you can do independently outside of coursework to build some of the skills you need to work in visual resources.

Photography, Photoshop, and Lightroom 

Knowledge of photography, especially editing software, is very helpful for managing image collections. I still have a lot to learn about photography, but I have heard that ShootFlyShoot has fantastic photography classes. Why is this important? So you understand how the images you work with are produced, and you can produce images if required. Some visual resources positions require original photography of works of art, either from works in museum or galleries, or from faculty and student work. I do not produce original photography in my current position, but I do a lot of scanning, and knowledge of photographic editing techniques is essential. I use Adobe Photoshop, and recommend Photoshop Classroom in a Book to learn the basics of using Photoshop. The book has a disc with tutorials and sample images to practice editing. Adobe Lightroom is a simpler and easier way to edit images and is preferred over Photoshop by some visual resources professionals.

Metadata

Just like a library book would be lost without a catalog record, images would be lost without good metadata. I believe that metadata is perhaps the most important part of managing image collections. After all, what’s the point of having a collection if your content cannot be easily found? Just as there are cataloging standards and formats for cataloging books, archival materials, etc., these also exist for visual resources collections. Cataloging Cultural Objects (CCO) is a content standard for visual resources collections (comparable to RDA) and VRA Core is a metadata schema used to describe images (comparable to MARC). If you have access to Adobe Bridge, you can download the VRA Core panel and practice creating metadata for images. It’s also essential to be familiar with the Getty vocabularies, which are now available as Linked Open Data. The vocabularies will give you the structured terminology for art, architecture, and other materials and are essential tools for the proper cataloging of images.

Image resources

Working in visual resources doesn’t just mean managing image collections. There is a reference and instruction component. You must be able to help others find and locate images using subscription databases, institutional image collections, and free resources on the web. The most popular subscription database for images is Artstor Digital Library. If the institution where you attend school or work does not have a subscription, you can still check out the website or YouTube videos to learn more about how the database works and how to use it. There is a section with free guides, including subject-specific guides, and studying these is an excellent way to increase your knowledge of this resource.

Visual resources professionals manage institutional image collections or archives. These collections can include images from faculty and student image requests, images from digitized slides, images purchased from vendors, and images related to institutional history. In order to properly manage these image collections, you need to know how digital asset management systems work. A broad knowledge of DAMs is important, because there are many different systems out there. The most popular DAMs for visual resources include Artstor’s Shared Shelf, Luna Imaging, and Madison Digital Image Database (MDID). These can be high cost for some institutions, so in-house solutions are also popular.

You also need to know how to locate high-quality and accurate images on the web. Libguides are an excellent way to compile these resources, and many institutions have great libguides on locating images for you to browse and study. My personal philosophy behind libguides, or curating image resources in general, is this: quality over quantity. Your job isn’t to know all instances of where to find images of the Mona Lisa. Your job is to know where to find the best images of the Mona Lisa.

Copyright and fair use

You also need to know how the images you manage, or how images available in subscription databases or on the web, can be used. This is why copyright and fair use comes into play. For general information on copyright law, look at Copyright Law for Librarians and Educators: Creative Strategies and Practical Solutions. For copyright information related to the visual arts, your best resources are from the College Art Association. Copyright, Permissions, and Fair Use among Visual Artists and the Academic and Museum Visual Arts Communities was released in 2014 and and the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts was released earlier this year. Study these documents and know them well.

Get experience – if you can

Some institutions don’t have a visual resources collection, but those that do usually need help. Don’t hesitate to reach out to a visual resources professional and ask if you can volunteer, intern, or even just visit the collection and learn more about what they do and what a typical day is like for them.

So this is what I recommend doing as a library science student if you are interested in visual resources. If other visual resources professionals are reading this, I’m curious to hear what you also recommend!

PT term Manager of Digital Assets and Collections Information– Glenstone

Position: Manager of Digital Assets and Collections Information

Reports to: Chief Archivist/Librarian

Background:

Located on 200 acres in Potomac, Maryland, Glenstone strives to provide visitors with a unique experience through the seamless integration of art, architecture, and landscape. Its first exhibition building was designed by late architect Charles Gwathmey and opened to the public in 2006. It hosts a series of rotating exhibitions with artworks drawn from Glenstone’s permanent collection of post-World War II art. The outdoor landscape is home to monumental sculptures carefully placed amidst rolling pasture and unspoiled woodland. Admission is always free, and visits are scheduled by appointment to encourage an unhurried, intimate engagement between the viewer and their surroundings.

Glenstone is now embarking upon an expansion in order to strengthen its commitment to the viewing public. The centerpiece of this project will be the construction of a new exhibition building designed by Thomas Phifer and Partners. The building will highlight a series of discreet pavilions, or “rooms” surrounding a central water courtyard, many of which will be devoted to single-artist installations. It will provide significantly expanded gallery space and state of the art collection storage. Landscape architects Peter Walker and Partners will also oversee a revised master plan of Glenstone’s outdoor landscape. Finally, the expansion will incorporate a new public entrance and visitor amenities, to support a more comfortable and rewarding visit.

Job Purpose:

To develop detailed requirements for systems to manage Glenstone’s digital assets, including: a Digital Asset Management System (DAMS) and/or Digital Preservation System.

Job Duties:

 Produce a short and long-range plan as it relates to the creation, management, and use of information, digital assets, and other collections-related assets; deliverable due by end of appointed term.

 Work closely with IT and other departments to ensure the reliability, security, and accessibility of all digital asset and collections information systems, including managing user groups, permissions, workflows, and reporting.

 Work with records creators across departments to establish logical file directory structures, naming conventions, metadata standards, and formats for born-digital records and assets.

 Develop and/or adopt metadata standards for digital assets and collections information.

 Develop policies, procedures, and workflows for the ingestion of digital assets and collections information into all digital asset and collections information systems. Train staff accordingly and monitor compliance.

 Develop and implement digital preservation strategies.

Required Qualifications:

 3-5 years of experience overseeing digital asset management and/or collections information management in a museum or archival setting.

 BA or equivalent in Art History, History or Humanities. Advanced degree, preferably MLIS with archival focus, or Museum Studies with Collections Information Management and/or Digital Asset Management focus highly preferred; or equivalent combination of education and experience.

 Knowledge of current best practices related to DAMS and collections information metadata, processes, and preservation strategies.

 Experience selecting and implementing digital asset management and/or collections information management systems.

 Experience and familiarity with one or more of the leading digital asset management systems, e.g., ADAM, Canto Cumulus, Extensis Portfolio, MeGlenstoneBin, NetXposure, Razuna, Xinet.

 Familiarity with one or more of the leading ILS or AMS platforms, e.g., Aleph/Voyager, Archivists’ Toolkit, Archon, CollectiveAccess, CuadraSTAR, Koha, Millennium, Omeka.

 Experience crafting institutional digitization and digital preservation strategies.

 Excellent verbal and written communication skills.

Preferred Qualifcations:

 Experience implementing open source software.

 Familiarity with current cataloging best practices and metadata standards for collections in museums, libraries, and archives, including Cataloging Cultural Objects (CCO), LIDO, CDWA Lite, AAT, ULAN, DACS, EAD, MARC, AACR, LCSH, Dublin Core, PBCore, VRA Core, IPTC Core, XMP, EXIF, METS, MODS, and other standards as appropriate.

 Ability to work with staff possessing a wide range of technical competence.

 Experience and/or familiarity with CRM software.

Salary:  Glenstone offers a competitive salary.  This is a six-month, term position.

Application Process:

Electronically submit a cover letter, resume, list of three professional references, and a writing sample to HR@glenstone.org, or mail to:

Human Resources Generalist
Glenstone
12002 Glen Road
Potomac, MD 20854

Date Posted: May 20, 2014

Deadline: June 6, 2014

Visual Resources Curator– Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia

Athens, Georgia

The Lamar Dodd School of Art seeks a curator of visual resources who possesses a solid knowledge of technology and an acute interest in providing new proactive services and support to faculty and students. This position reports to the Director of the School of Art. The curator will be responsible for developing, managing, and delivering visual resources, and for managing and overseeing additional digital teaching materials. Essential functions of the Visual Resources Curator include administration of the collection and training student staff. The successful candidate will work within the Lamar Dodd School of Art with a community of over 900 undergraduate students in Studio, Art History, and Art Education, 100 art history undergraduate majors and minors, 100 graduate students, and more than 45 tenured faculty in these three disciplines.

It is anticipated that the future projects for this increasingly dynamic position will require multiple skills, including the ability to manage complex, multi-year projects, to work in close collaboration with the faculty, administration, and staff of the Lamar Dodd School of Art, and to build relationships with the UGA. Libraries and with faculty and students across campus who may be investigating the visual arts. Projects may include digitizing the Lamar Dodd School of Art’s significant historic art slide collections, and collaborating with the UGA Libraries to develop print and digital resources and services on site in the Lamar Dodd School of Art. This challenging and rewarding opportunity requires both creative flexibility and independent individual initiative.

Requirements:

M.A. or B.A. in art
 history, architecture, visual studies
 or a related field. Substantial experience working with visual resources collections with knowledge of the issues around the creation, maintenance, and access of a visual resources collection, including familiarity with standards for visual materials. Experience working with digital imaging technologies and library management. Reading knowledge of multiple languages, ideally including one Romance language and German. Excellent interpersonal and communication skills, and ability to work in a collaborative setting. Strong organizational and management skills, including the ability to initiate, track, and manage complex, multi-year projects successfully.

Desirable qualifications:

MLIS or course work leading to an MLIS degree. Experience
 with
 image collection
 management
 and presentation
 software. Knowledge of digital images best practices. Familiarity with Macintosh operating system and proficiency with PowerPoint, PhotoShop, and web content and learning management systems (eLC). Understanding of copyright issues related to image collection management. Previous supervisory experience or team leadership.

We will receive applications for this position through the University of Georgia employment website, under the position title “Program Coordinator II” (https://www.ugajobsearch.com ).

Review of applications will begin on May 19, and will continue until the position is filled.

Assistant Visual Resources Curator– School of Visual Arts

DATE AVAILABLE: May 2014
JOB TITLE: Assistant Visual Resources Curator
DEPARTMENT: Visual Arts Library
REPORTS TO: Visual Resources Curator
STATUS: Exempt

POSITION OVERVIEW: Assists Visual Resources Curator in the daily operation of the Visual Resources Collection.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Develop and provide access to digital image collection.
  • Provide support to faculty and student in the Visual Resources Collection.
  • Assist the curator in the daily operation of the Visual Resources Collection.
  • Maintain image database, organize and manage electronic images.
  • Oversee image processing (scanning of digital material, creation of metadata, and uploading of images and metadata to our local database).
  • Assist with ongoing digital image conversion projects; familiarizing faculty with MDID2, ARTstor, and other image resources.
  • Assist with inquires regarding scanning, Photoshop, PowerPoint and other VR related software and equipment as needed.
  • Troubleshoot image databases and working with Library Systems staff and campus IT to resolve technical issues.
  • Supervise and train student staff.
  • Occasional general maintenance of analog collection.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Bachelor’s degree in Art History, Fine Arts, Design, or other relevant field.
  • Knowledge of contemporary art–or be able to demonstrate an equivalent combination of education and experience.
  • Strong knowledge of digital imaging technologies, scanning, FileMaker Pro, PhotoShop, Excel, PowerPoint, PC and Mac Platforms
  • Mature and professional demeanor.
  • Excellent communication skills and the ability to work well with a diverse group of people.
  • High organizational aptitude and attention to detail.
  • Previous visual resources, library, art history, or gallery experience; working knowledge of data standards used for cataloging works of art and/or general office experience a plus.

School of Visual Arts has been a leader in the education of artists, designers, and creative professionals for more than six decades. With a faculty of distinguished working professionals, dynamic curriculum, and an emphasis on critical thinking, SVA is a catalyst for innovation and social responsibility. Comprised of more than 6,000 students at its Manhattan campus and 35,000 alumni in 100 countries, SVA also represents one of the most influential artistic communities in the world. For information about the College’s 31 undergraduate and graduate degree programs, visit sva.edu.

Find out what it’s like to work at SVA visit: www.sva.edu/about-sva/working-at-sva .

To apply for this position, please send a cover letter and resume to working@sva.edu. No walk-ins please.

The School of Visual Arts is an equal opportunity employer.

Full post here.

Library Collections Technician– Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY

For those of you who are interested in photographic archives…

 

Position Summary:

The department manages a circulating collection of slides, videos, 16mm films, and pictures/clippings and
an archival collection of bookplates, photographs, and design drawings. Under moderate supervision and
with moderate latitude for independent judgment, the employee holding this position participates in the
preservation, maintenance and acquisition of these collections.

Position Duties:

– Participate in the evaluation, scanning, inventory, and de-accessioning of the department’s circulating
slide, video, 16mm, and picture collections.
– Participate in maintenance of archival still and moving image collections including inventorying,
rehousing, and scanning projects.
– Assist Curator in maintaining digital image production work flow and tracking deadlines.
– Oversee filing, shelving, labeling, and repair of circulating departmental collections.
– Participate in acquisition of digital images and videos including entering and tracking orders and
preparing items for circulation.
– Oversee circulation statistics of departmental collections.
– Participate in providing public service as needed, including relaying policies, receiving image orders and
video purchase requests, assisting patrons locate images in ARTstor and the Picture Collection,
circulating slides, videos, and 16mm film.
– Participate in the hiring, scheduling, training, and supervising of student workers and graduate
assistants.
– Propose policies and procedures associated with department services
– Perform all other related duties as assigned

Education:
High school diploma or equivalent; and relevant associate’s degree or minimum 2 years related college
required. Bachelor’s degree or minor in film or photo-related field preferred.

Experience:
Must have experience handling rare or fragile materials, especially slides, photographs, and film.
Experience working with cataloguing and databases preferred.

Other:
Excellent organizational, interpersonal, communication, and customer service skills required.

To Apply: Please submit your cover letter, resume, and the names and contact information for three
professional references.

PRATT INSTITUTE IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND RECOGNIZES AND
VALUES THE BENEFITS OF A DIVERSE WORKFORCE.
Position Type – Full-Time/Regular
Salary – 39,400.50 USD
Tracking Code – 1386

 

From VRA Job Opportunities.

Special Collections Manager- The School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Duties
The School of the Art Institute of Chicago is currently seeking a detailed oriented professional that will participate in and support the curatorial, instructional, access, and preservation functions of the Flaxman Library?s Special Collections program.  This individual will assist the Special Collections Librarian in all aspects of collections management. In the absence of the Librarian, the Special Collections Manager will assume responsibility for daily operations, including management of facilities and collections (both physical and digital) and interactions with students, faculty, staff, researchers, and other visitors to the collections.Under the supervision of the Special Collections Librarian, the Special Collections Manager will represent the School and the Flaxman Library in presenting our resources to all types of visitors, on site and online. As directed, will work with colleagues throughout the campus and the external art, library, and archival communities to develop, maintain, and promote our collections and programs, in furtherance of the School?s goals and interests.  Assist with care of irreplaceable collections and materials, in a high-use educational environment. Contribute significantly to assigned digital library and cataloging projects, working in close cooperation with relevant staff at the School and the Museum, as necessary to complete assignments.

Qualifications
THE SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE WILL HAVE: Bachelor?s degree in an art- or design-related field; advanced degree preferred. One or more years of relevant work experience in a library, archive, museum, gallery, or other collection-based setting. Demonstrable knowledge of contemporary art practices based in artists? books, archives, exhibitions, and/or publishing. Understanding of basic principles of preservation and handling for works of art and archival materials; Understanding of basic cataloging and metadata standards.  Good organizational and communication skills.  Proficiency using standard office software and hardware, web services, and networked environments. Ability to work effectively within a team or independently.  High commitment to customer service;  Must be able to routinely lift up to 50 pounds.Preferred
Teaching, curating, and/or publishing experience;
Experience with digital library workflows and standards;
Experience with scanning software and digital scanners, and related peripheral devices;
Experience with widely-used library systems and software such as OCLC, CONTENTdm, Voyager, or others;
Involvement in planning and execution of (on site and/or online) exhibitions;
Supervisory experience.

Apply here. Job ID: 7990.

Educational Opportunities!

There are A LOT of educational opportunities in this post so read carefully! As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great webinars, CFPs, internships and more opportunities below!

Webinars/Online Chats

  1. Mark your calendar now for Sept 13th chat: Tips for a successful job interview. Open to all! http://connect.ala.org/node/186969. The interview stage of a job search can be riddled with emotions; excitement, nervousness, and stress to name a few. This chat will explore some of the ways you can be better prepared for your big day. Topics to guide our discussion include but are not limited to what activities your interview day may include, how you should prepare, how should you dress, what questions you might expect to get from the search committee, and what to expect after your interview is complete. While we will focus on academic libraries, many of the topics cross-over to other types of libraries. Please come with your questions and be prepared for a fun and informative chat! Deana Groves, ALCTS New Members Interest Group (ANMIG) Webmaster, will be your host along with the assistance of Liz Siler, ALCTS ANMIG Chair. The chat will be on September 13th from 2:00 – 3:00pm EST and is open to ALA members of all types. To join the chat: connect.ala.org/node/186576
  2. Title:  Successful Librarians Share Their Stories of Career Growth and Advancement
    Presenters:  Deb Hunt and David Grossman
    Format:  Webinar
    Date:  Thursday, September 6, 2012 Start Time:       12 Noon Pacific 1PM Mountain 2PM Central 3PM Eastern. This webinar will last approximately one hour. Webinars are free of charge.  Please note: we have changed hosting services fromWebEx to Adobe Connect, so we advise you to test your browser before the webinar: http://intesolv.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm For more webinar tips, see: http://infopeople.org/webinar/tips. For more information and to participate in the Thursday, September 6, 2012 webinar, go to http://infopeople.org/training/librarians-share-their-stories. How are some librarians finding practical ways to cope, successfully navigate, and even thrive in the face of a lingering recession? How can you recognize and avoid the most common mistakes that can determine the difference between success and failure in any career situation? How can you to reinvent yourself and prepare for success in a new career in a very different or less traditional role? What secrets can be learned from successful individuals who have become leaders in the library/information profession? What new career opportunities are possible for you and how can you plan a strategy to pursue something new? This webinar will assist library staff, both professional and paraprofessional, in understanding the wide range of career opportunities available to them and how to visualize a path to success. A number of successful and unsuccessful stories will be discussed. Attendees will review and analyze successful and unsuccessful case studies to help them chart a path to career advancement, such as moving into a less traditional library role or making a lateral move into a very different career.  They will also learn how to identify, select and acquire the most relevant “front runner” or leadership “personas” that contribute to professional success in the current climate. At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will: Be able to envision their path to advancement through the analysis of the accomplishments of other librarians and information professionals who have successfully climbed the organizational ladder, transitioned into a new career, or become a “front runner” or leader in our profession. Learn how to continually reinvent themselves to overcome adversity and achieve success in any work environment. Gain insight into some exciting career opportunities often overlooked by librarians and information professionals. Know how to prepare themselves for one of the numerous alternative career opportunities readily available to librarians and information professionals. This webinar will be of interest to professional and paraprofessional library staff contemplating the next job opportunity or career change and those seeking to identify their current skills and acquire new ones. This is the third in a series of four webinars presented by Deb Hunt and David Grossman. You can view their previous webinars at http://infopeople.org/training/identifying-and-acquiring-new-skills. If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar.  Check our archive listing at:  http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived

Internships

  1. Call for applications: 2013 ARLIS/NA Internship Award. Please share with current students and recent graduates of graduate programs in library science, art history, architectural history, architecture, studio art or museum studies. The Art Libraries Society of North America is now accepting applications for its annual Internship Award for 2013.

    The ARLIS/NA Internship Award provides financial support for students preparing for a career in art librarianship or visual resources curatorship. The award grants $2,500.00 to the selected recipient to support a period of internship in an art library or visual resources collection.
    The deadline for applications is October 15, 2012.
    For detailed information about the award and application instructions please see the ARLIS/NA website: http://www.arlisna.org/about/awards/internship_info.html

  2. WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART LIBRARY FALL INTERN PROGRAM 2012 — Library and Archives. The Whitney Museum of American Art Library is seeking applicants for internships to begin this fall 2012.  Under the supervision of professional library staff, interns will gain first-hand museum library experience by participating in regular departmental activities that range from research to routine administrative and clerical tasks.  Each intern will also focus on one individual project.  Participants must be willing to commit to at least 120 hours during the semester and may arrange to receive college credit.

    QUALIFICATIONS AND APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Preferred candidates are students already enrolled in a certified graduate library degree program with an interest in American art and/or museum work, have internship or experience working in a library and excellent administrative skills.  If interested, please submit, via e-mail, your cover letter, current resume and references to library[at]whitney[dot]org .  Please include dates you will be available for an interview with Library staff.

CFPS

  1. ACRL 2013 Conference Call for Poster Proposals
    Got an innovative library-based project, best practices to solve a problem, or unique research findings? Consider sharing them in a poster session! Posters should be an eye-catching visual representation of a topic, including graphics, tables, charts, text, and images. Presenters can communicate additional details via online handouts. Presenters share their ideas with colleagues as attendees circulate during one hour time blocks in the poster session area, located in the exhibits hall. Since space is limited at a poster session, a maximum of two presenters per poster at any one time is recommended. The Poster Session Committee looks for topics that will engage attendees during repeated presentations.
    Potential topics can be seen in the program tags that are included on the proposal instructions page (link below). Poster topics from underrepresented categories are of particular interest.  Here are some examples:
    cataloging & technical services
    collections projects
    preservation projects
    digitization
    data management and services
    Use the application form to sell your idea in a short, dynamic summary and provide a more complete discussion of the contents for the reviewers.  Please plan to submit an electronic version of your poster so that it can be posted online with conference handouts. Submissions are due by November 9, 2012.
    Program Proposal Instructions https://s4.goeshow.com/acrl/national/2013/abstract_instruct.cfm
    Proposal Submission Form  https://s4.goeshow.com/acrl/national/2013/abstract_submission.cfm
    Questions should be directed to Margot Conahan at mconahan[at]ala[dot]org or call (312) 280-2522.
  2. Marginalized Bodies:  Studies in Deformities and Disabilities in Early Modern Art
    Deformities and disabilities have been depicted in art since antiquity, and yet a comprehensive text on the subject as it pertains to art of the Early Modern era has yet to be written. Barry Wind glosses over the topic in A Foul and Pestilent Congregation, dealing primarily with dwarfism and gibbosity as they pertain only to the themes of “the world upside down” and the Commedia dell’ Arte.  These tropes of entertainment or curiosity are also discussed in monographs, mainly on artists like Velazquez and Callot, again limiting the discussions to depictions of dwarves at court and the comical aspects of deformity.  Deformities and disabilities also figure in texts on teratology and the kunstkammer, for example, Datson and Park’sWonders and the Order of Nature. The richness of the social, cultural, religious, political, and philosophical aspects of deformity and disability in the Early Modern era have yet to be revealed.  We wish to address this lacuna in Early Modern art scholarship by producing an anthology that integrates all aspects of deformity and disabilities as depicted in Early Modern art, utilizing an all-inclusive perspective.  We seek papers that offer particular case studies on Early Modern depictions of deformities and disabilities that address the subject from this broader outlook.
    Topics might include the apotropaic qualities of deformity and disabilities, deformities and disabilities as a means to exercising charity—the Catholic and Protestant approaches, deformed and disabled beggars, deformed and disabled saints, demonizing/idealizing deformities and disabilities, deformities and disabilities caused by disease, deformities and disabilities as reflections of sin, deformity and disability in mythology, deformed and disabled artists, aging and disability in artists and patrons, considerations of deformities and disabilities in architecture, the theoretical aspects of depicting the hideous in art, the treatment  of deformity and disability in portraiture, concealment/disclosure of deformities and disabilities, and scapegoating the deformed and disabled at times of catastrophic  events.
    To be considered for the project, kindly submit a 500 word abstract to Sandra Cheng (schengnyc[at]gmail[dot]com), Kimberlee A. Cloutier-Blazzard (kac9b[at]mindspring[dot]com), and Lilian H. Zirpolo (lilianzirpolo[at]gmail[dot]com), along with a short CV, by September 15, 2012.

Conferences & Continuing Education

  1. We are looking for additional peer reviewers for Art Documentation, the journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America.  We welcome reviewers in all areas of interest and expertise, but in particular we are seeking those with the knowledge and background to be able to review articles about cataloging/metadata, digital collections, museum libraries, and new media/new technology.
    Reviewers are needed for the Spring 2013 issue.  You would receive the article by September 15 and have 3 weeks to prepare your comments and recommendations.  We’d like to expand the pool of reviewers for future issues as well, so even if you are not available at this time but are interested in reviewing, I would like to hear from you.
    Please follow this link to take the short Survey Monkey survey to indicate your interest in reviewing, your availability, and your areas of expertise:
    https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/BZL3QPR
  2. Archiving the Arts:
    addressing preservation in the creative process
    Saturday, October 13, 2012
    9:00 AM–5:00 PM
    Michelson Theater
    NYU Tisch School of the Arts
    Department of Cinema Studies
    721 Broadway, 6th Floor
    New York, NY 10003
    Presented by:
    Association of Moving Image Archivists Student Chapter at New York University
    and Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP)
    Archiving the Arts unlocks dialogue concerning preventive preservation, the creative process, and where the two concepts intersect.
    Unlike corporate or policy-based content, independent media art evolves and is often born from fleeting processes, creative approaches, and undocumented methods. Its unique development deserves to be addressed by both its makers and those who fight for its welfare after creation.
    Our primary goal is to straddle an antiquated divide. Instead of finite responsibilities dictated by title, archivists and artists must learn to work collaboratively in the complex independent media environment. Join us on October 13 as we bridge the gap!
    Registration Fee: $15.00
    Students with valid ID: $9.00
    Seating is extremely limited
    Register at:
    http://www.imappreserve.org/join/membership.html
    Questions:
    Kathryn Gronsbell via NYU.AMIA@gmail.com
    Jeff Martin via imap@imappreserve.org
    Archiving the Arts is part of New York Archives Week, which is organized by the Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York. www.nycarchivists.org.
  3. ALCTS web course: Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management
    Session: October 1-October 26,  2012
    This four-week online course addresses the basic components of collection development and management (CDM) in libraries. The course was developed by Peggy Johnson, University of Minnesota. Complete definition of collection development and collection management
    – Collections policies and budgets as part of library planning
    – Collection development (selecting for and building collections)
    – Collection management (evaluating and making decisions about existing collections, including decisions about withdrawal, transfer, preservation)
    – Collection analysis-why and how to do it
    – Outreach, liaison, and marketing
    – Trends and some suggestions about the future for collection development and management
    Outcomes: At the end of this course, you will be able to:
    – Describe the range of CDM responsibilities and the required skills and competencies
    – List the elements in a collection development policy
    – Write a collection development policy
    – Explain the importance of collection analysis
    – Perform one or more types of analysis
    – Explain outreach and liaison responsibilities and be able to develop a plan to increase your activities in these areas
    Who Should Attend: This is a fundamentals course that will appeal to anyone interested in the topic with no previous experience.
    Credits: This course is one-third of the Collection Management elective course approved by the Library Support Staff Certification Program (LSSCP)<http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webcourse/lsscp>
    Registration Fees:  $109 ALCTS Member and  $129 Non-member
    For additional details including registration links and contact information
    see: http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webcourse/fcdm/ol_templ
    For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling
    1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration[at]ala[dot]org. For all other questions or comments related to this web courses, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or alctsce@ala.org.

Job Posting: Assistant Visual Resource Manager (AAOA), Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art – Assistant Visual Resource Manager, AAOA

General Description:

Under the direction of the Collections Manager, the Assistant Visual Resource Manager will be responsible for arranging, describing, and cataloging the collections of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas Visual Resource Archive (AAOA VRA). A successful candidate will work closely with the Museum Archivist and the Collections Management staff in the Digital Media Department to establish and maintain archival and cataloguing standards for the Museum. Incumbent will create processing plans, arrange, house, and describe the records; create detailed online finding aids and catalog records; assist patrons of the collections and respond to collections queries, and seek out additional methods for online presentation of the collections to the public. Background research on collections to be undertaken with the aid of departmental curators, when necessary.

Primary Responsibilities and Duties:

• Responsible for the identification, arrangement, inventory, organization, and preservation of photographs and manuscript materials so they are accessible for reference
• Maintain national archival standards and utilize specific archival training to catalog archival collections
• Create finding aids for individual collections
• Provide reference assistance and answer research queries of museum staff and outside researchers
• Train and supervise volunteers and interns in the care, processing, and digitization of photograph collections
• Undertake collections surveys and identify possible funding to improve presentation and access of collections
• Other related duties

Requirements and Qualifications

Experience and Skills:

• 3-5 years of professional experience processing archives, personal papers, or manuscripts
• Successfully demonstrated experience applying processing and descriptive standards including DACS, EAD, and MARC-XML
• Must be proficient with Microsoft Office
• Proficiency with The Museum System (TMS) preferred
• Basic knowledge of the preservation and conservation practices for historical records
• Strong interpersonal skills, writing, and historical research skills

Knowledge and Education:

• Masters Degree from an ALA-accredited program in library and information science with a concentration in archives administration, special collections, or related discipline with coursework and experience in the care and management of historical photograph collections
• Demonstrated knowledge of Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS), Encoded Archival Description (EAD), and other professional standards
• Background in art history preferred

The Metropolitan Museum of Art provides equal opportunity to all employees and applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, creed, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, ancestry, age, mental or physical disability, pregnancy, alienage or citizenship status, marital status or domestic partner status, genetic information, genetic predisposition or carrier status, gender identity, HIV status, military status and any other category protected by law in all employment decisions, including but not limited to recruitment, hiring, compensation, training and apprenticeship, promotion, upgrading, demotion, downgrading, transfer, lay-off and termination, and all other terms and conditions of employment.

Please send cover letter, resume, and salary history to employoppty@metmuseum.org with the position title in the subject line.

Job Posting: Visual Resources Librarian for Islamic Art & Architecture, Harvard College Library

Visual Resources Librarian for Islamic Art and Architecture, Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture

Harvard College Library

Cambridge, MA

Reporting to the Public Services Librarian, this position is responsible for research support, collaboration, and outreach for visual materials in the field of Islamic art and architecture to faculty, students, and researchers. Visual materials collections include digital images and slides for teaching as well as other formats documenting all aspects of Islamic art and architecture in the Fine Arts Library including historic photographs, postcards, and ephemera. Additional responsibilities include implementation of appropriate and forward-looking image metadata schemes, digital access, and participation in collection development and management. Works closely with the Bibliographer in the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture and the Photographic Resources Librarian in the Fine Arts Library and the faculty and staff of the Aga Khan Program.

Typical Duties and Responsibilities:

Collection Management, Development, and Access

  • Identifies, evaluates , and acquires images, digital resources, historic photographs, and other visual materials for the library’s teaching and research collection
  • Assesses and selects historic photographs and other visual materials in the Fine Arts Library’s collection for digitization and preservation (in consultation with the AKPIA Bibliographer and FAL Photographic Resources Librarian)
  • Works with AKPIA and other faculty members, students, fellows, and visiting scholars to set collection priorities based on research and curricular needs
  • Coordinates and prioritizes production of different digital products (scanning, uploading, cataloging); tracks workflows and timely service to users
  • Provides intellectual control for Islamic visual materials in OLIVIA, ARTstor Shared Shelf project, and other catalogues including collaboration to establish best practices and authority control
  • Participates in planning and implementing projects involving visual materials
  • Develops long-range planning for Islamic visual images collection in consultation with AKPIA faculty and staff

Reference and Instructional Support

  • Provides research services for visual materials in Islamic art and architectural history for faculty, students, and researchers
  • Selects and provides teaching images in appropriate formats and other visual resources for classroom lectures and course websites
  • Provides individual and group research support including in-class workshops and personalized instruction
  • Assists faculty and students in integrating GIS, Prezi , and other visual tools in lectures, course websites
  • Prepares online research guides, reference tools, and finding aids for Islamic visual materials
  • Assists with image research and provides images, as needed, for Muqarnas and other Harvard and MIT AKPIA publications

Collaboration and Outreach

  • Collaborates with diverse Harvard colleagues including the Loeb Design Library, NELC, CMES, and Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program
  • Collaborates with AKPIA Documentation Center at MIT, Archnet, and other external initiatives on the creation and sharing of metadata, content, and services for users of visual materials on Islamic art and architecture such as SAHARA
  • Works with other Harvard groups supporting interdisciplinary and digital scholarship such as academic departments and programs, DASH, CGA, and the Library Lab Initiative to develop content and research/teaching opportunities

Supervisory Responsibilities

  • Supervises year-round student employees and temporary/project staff (as needed) in the creation of item level and collection-level cataloging and indexing for Islamic visual materials in all formats
  • Working together with other stakeholders, develops special projects for access to and dissemination of Islamic visual culture

 

Basic Qualifications:

  • Master’s degree in library and/or information science or equivalent experience
  • Advanced degree at the master’s level or higher in the history of art and architecture related to the study of the Islamic world, or the equivalent combination of education, experience and/or background etc.
  • 3-5 years related professional library experience required
  • Knowledge of at least one Middle Eastern language (Arabic, Persian, Turkish)
  • Expertise in image metadata standards and online data creation and access
  • Computer skills including databases and digital image file management, required
  • Excellent interpersonal, communication, and organizational skills required

Additional Qualifications:

  • Working knowledge of western European languages, especially French and German
  • Knowledge of the contemporary field of Islamic art and architecture historical study and its constituents
  • Knowledge of other archival collections projects related to visual culture and history of the Middle East
  • Ability to use a computer, monitor, keyboard, and mouse

 Please apply with a cover letter and resume at the Harvard Employment Site.  

Apply Here:  http://www.click2apply.net/wy6zy39