Call for Proposals: ArLiSNAP and VREPS November 2018 Virtual Conference

ArLiSNAP and VREPS welcome proposals from students and new professionals with an interest in art librarianship or visual resources management to present their work at our 2018 Virtual Conference:

New Media Challenges and Solutions for Art Information Professionals  

New media art, objects, and scholarly projects in the digital realm are challenging our traditional definitions and methodologies for collection, preservation, and research as information professionals. As the scope for new media continues to expand, how are we defining, describing, and cataloging new media objects? How are we preparing for and anticipating storage and conservation needs? How do we respect artist intent and support scholarly research around these born-digital objects?

We invite proposals that share research and projects featuring new media in art librarianship and visual resources management for our annual virtual conference, an opportunity for emerging professionals to present in a supportive and engaging space while connecting with other students and early career librarians across North America.

The webinar will take place on Saturday, November 10th at 1PM CST. Submit your proposal via our Google Form to apply.

Proposals are due by Friday, September 14th. You must also be available to participate in a short practice session with the webinar software in the evening on Thursday, October 4. If you have any questions, please email the ArLiSNAP Conference Planning Liaison, Michelle Wilson at michelle.elizabeth.wilson@gmail.com.

Join ArLiSNAP at the 2018 ARLIS Winter Conference!

The ARLIS 2018 Winter Conference will be held in New York City from February 25-March 1. Registration for the conference is now open, and we hope that you’ll consider attending one of ArLiSNAP’s events while you’re in town.

Attend our Annual Meeting
Sunday February 25 | 3:00pm – 4:00pm

At our annual meeting we will discuss what ArLiSNAP has been up to in the last year and our plans for 2018. Let us know what kind of content and information you hope to see in the next year and hear about upcoming opportunities to volunteer and participate in our community.

ArLiSNAP Night Out!
Tuesday, February 27 | 7:30pm

Join ArLiSNAP at The Stag’s Head on Tuesday, February 27 @ 7:30 PM. Our night out is an opportunity to meet other students and new professionals from around the country to talk about our conference experiences. The pub is just a short walk from the conference, at 252 E 51st St, and we hope to see many of you there!

Register for our Workshop
Thursday, March 1 | 9:00am – 1:00pm

Attend ArLiSNAP’s career development workshop featuring a career advice panel hosted by our co-moderator Breanne Crumpton. Get tips on writing the perfect cover letter and receive expert and peer critiques on your resume. In our final panel, learn more about the academic publishing industry and how to get started as an author.

The workshop is free! Read more about our speakers and activities here.

 

Questions about ArLiSNAP’s events at the winter conference? Email our conference liaison at michelle.wilson(at)rutgers.edu

Michelle Wilson
ArLiSNAP Conference Liaison

ARLIS/NA Conference to be held in Montréal in 2021!

ARLIS/NA Conference in Montréal, Canada in 2021

Original post by Jessica Herbert, ARLIS/NA MOQ, Nov 20, 2017. See full post here

In 2021, we invite you to discover Montréal: one of the largest French speaking cities in the world, a UNESCO city of Design, a festival town, a food lover’s paradise, an art metropolis, a technology hub. The Montréal-Ottawa-Québec (MOQ) chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America proposes to host the 2021 ARLIS/NA conference in Montréal in late March 2021, to allow for milder winter temperatures.

Why Montréal? Over the last decade, the downtown core has benefited from a significant Quartier des spectacles revitalization project, which links together public spaces, the Montréal Museum of Contemporary Art, concert halls, theatres, galleries and restaurants in a dynamic and accessible setting. Art and design are intertwined in the daily life of the city, with hundreds of public artworks. Our proposed timing for the conference would provide a particularly intriguing opportunity to experience art’s role in this city’s civic life, as it would coincide with the annual Art Souterrain festival which features hundreds of public art exhibits in Montréal’s underground city.

For the 2021 conference, we propose a theme centering around the idea of convergence. The city of Montréal itself is a site of convergence, as a place where both French and English are commonly spoken, different languages and cultures come together, and a blend of old and new is manifested in its history, architecture and integration of technologies. This theme also reflects the nature of ARLIS/NA and the MOQ chapter, which are composed of members from a variety of different backgrounds, working in small and large institutions, including public libraries, academic institutions, museums as well as many independent professionals and students. The theme of convergence can be expanded to explore the relationship between professional practice with community and arts organizations like art hives and fablabs. It can also focus on the convergence of new technologies, such as 3D printers, virtual reality, and digital artists’ books and how they have become integrated into the practice of librarianship.

Since the ARLIS/NA conference was last held in Montréal in 1995, with the theme of Art and the Francophone World, the city has continued to evolve, particularly in the arts and cultural sector. We will provide an itinerary that will allow attendees to revisit some historical highlights of the city, while learning about newer initiatives and cultural institutions that have developed over the past twenty years, including organisations with a focus on digital technologies, such as the Société des arts technologiques and the Phi Centre.

 

 

Join us in La belle province in 2021!

 

On behalf of the Montréal-Ottawa-Québec chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America.

Canadian Librarians Spotlight: An Interview with Mark Black

What is the name of the employer/institution you work for?

Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity

Can you tell us a little bit about your background, your current position, and how you got into the field of (art) librarianship?

I’m currently the manager of the Paul D. Fleck Library and Archives at Banff Centre. I have been working libraries in a variety of positions from clerk to marketing to home delivery to programming to youth librarian since 1997. I also have worked in television as a researcher and production coordinator.

My arts background is mostly in music and the literary arts. When it comes to fine arts, I would say my formal skill set is somewhat lacking. I spent a few years working in this library as a clerk back in 2001-2003 so I have called on that experience a lot. Luckily I wasn’t hired to be an artist, I was hired to be a librarian. I do need to modify my approach depending on needs, but ultimately the goal is to put people in touch with what they need in order to create and learn.

It’s been a very circuitous route. I was lucky to have worked for a number of librarians who encouraged me to pursue librarianship. My grades were not good, but everything I did from 1997 until I entered grad school had a library or research focus. I made it hard for them to not accept me because I wouldn’t settle for anything but a yes.

What brought you to your current position? 

I was a youth librarian at an under-resourced and heavily used public library.  I loved the staff and kids I worked with, but it could be a very taxing job. I’m probably describing the work of every public librarian ever. I wanted to prove myself in a leadership role and the opportunities to do so weren’t present. I had promised myself that after two years in my position I’d re-evaluate where I was headed career wise. Almost exactly two years to my start date this job was posted and it seemed like fate. I had worked at Banff Centre in the library early in my career and thought it might be the right fit for me again. I was lucky that they thought so too.

What does a typical day at work look like for you?

Check email, meetings with departments, staff, faculty, and artists on how the library can support their work – whether through our current collections, increased access to resources, or hosting programming, reference questions, taking care of paperwork (HR, budget, scheduling, health and safety, purchasing), trying to plan for and prognosticate the needs of our users – I want to make sure that we not only react to their needs, but anticipate them, drink too many cokes, and a steady iTunes soundtrack.  Also in there is reading to stay on top of trends and news that impacts our library and our community of users and trying to squeeze in professional development.

What were/are some challenges for you as an art(s) librarian? What do you think are current challenges in the field of art librarianship/librarianship in general, particularly within Canada?

One of my greatest struggles is developing a collection that is inclusive. We work in an industry that is primarily white with materials that are predominantly produced by white people. Our collections and our practices have a lot of blind spots. We have to be better. It’s a big conversation that has to happen at so many levels – collections, library schools, hiring practices, programming, etc. and I’m not sure we as librarians are actively having it

Do you have any advice for current students and/or those on the job market? What are the most important things emerging art librarians should know?

Be honest in interviews. Know your value, know why someone would want to hire you, and communicate that in an interview.  Formulate a game plan of how you are going to sell yourself and your abilities in an interview and make sure to hit those notes.

You’re trying to create a relationship in an interview as quickly as possible.  It will help you make a decision on whether this job is a good fit if you do your best to be you throughout it.

Can you talk a little bit about ways that you draw on the more conventional aspects of your LIS education? What are some things you’ve had to learn on your own?

I’m not entirely convinced that my LIS education sufficiently prepared me for what I would encounter in the field so to speak. I had a lot of well educated, distinguished, and intelligent professors, but what I was taught in the classroom and what I encounter in practice are often quite different. There can often be a gap between library academics and library practitioners. It’s not a right or wrong situation, it’s just that my experience in libraries didn’t always match up with what I learned in the classroom.

The three biggest areas where I had to learn on my own were: public outreach and community building, leadership/coaching/managing a staff, and finances (budgeting, grant applications, business proposals).

Luckily there are lots of colleagues who have been in the same position and you can draw on a diversity of opinions and experiences – that has helped a lot.

What would you consider the most rewarding parts of your job, and what are your biggest challenges as an information professional in a special library environment?

Most rewarding: Putting someone in touch with something they didn’t know existed or didn’t know was accessible– as librarians we can often make the impossible seem possible and that is a great feeling.

Biggest challenge: No library is free from this – there are still a lot of people who do not understand the possibilities of the library and what a library can offer (whether it’s academic, public, special etc.). It’s an ongoing struggle to prove our relevance to people who not only haven’t been through our doors, but don’t even know where our doors are.

Do you have any insight or advice as to how ArLiSNAP can assist in connecting emerging Canadian and American information professionals?

Mentor partnering, informal meet-ups and chats, opportunities to partner with more established information professionals for presentation or writing opportunities – really just anything that gives people a chance to speak honestly, connect, and share knowledge in an environment that drops ranks and allows everyone to be themselves. We all need a place where we can ask earnest questions without feeling dumb or judged.

Tell us something fun about yourself! What do you do in your spare time? If you could take a trip right now to visit any library in the world, which would it be?

Baseball, music (mostly punk rock), reading, and travel are my biggest outlets. I’m trying to  get back into ice skating and skiing now that I am back in the mountains – my mileage will vary.

Easy – the Giamatti Research Center at the National Baseball Hall of Fame Library in Cooperstown, New York. I have dreamed of working there for almost 20 years.  Some day?

Register for our Fall 2017 Virtual Conference!

ArLiSNAP (Art Library Students and New ARLIS Professionals) and VREPS (Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students) are pleased to announce our 2017 Fall Virtual Conference: Critical Librarianship in the Arts. The conference will take place at 1pm CST October 14, 2017.

To register for this free event, visit https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6211153665740783363. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

As defined on critlib.org, critical librarianship is “a movement of library workers dedicated to bringing social justice principles into our work in libraries.” We are pleased to welcome keynote speaker Jennifer Ferretti, Digital Initiatives Librarian of Maryland Institute, College of Art, who will be be speaking on what critical librarianship means to her in a keynote address:

Art is Information (and neither are neutral).

Our keynote lecture will be followed by 1.5 to 2 hours of presentations by students and new professionals discussing projects with a focus on Critical Librarianship. Our speaker panel will include:

Arielle Lavigne, University of Washington
“Processing Protests in the Pacific Northwest – Technically and Emotionally”

Following the Women’s March on Seattle, archivists at the University of Washington solicited donations of images from the Women’s March, and from the seemingly continuous stream of marches, protests, and rallies that have followed it. This presentation addresses questions the archive has been dealing with as they collect and process these collections, discusses the resources relied on in attempting to develop controlled vocabulary that was explicitly anti-racist and feminist, and shares some of the images that are most illustrative of the difficulties they experienced.

Marianne R. Williams, University of Arkansas
“X Degrees of Separation: Exploring Visual Literacy through Google’s Experimental Search Strategies”

Google Arts and Culture has launched a series of online experiments using machine learning techniques that analyze the aesthetic elements of artworks and allow for the browsing of huge amounts of visual information. How can a tool like this be used in curatorial practice or visual research, and what issues or problems might arise? 

Haylee Freeman, UCLA
“The Writing on the Wall: An Inspection of Graffiti Terminology and Bias in Controlled Vocabularies”

Technological tools and systems used and created within libraries, archives, and museums are often thought of as insignificant and neutral, and yet the systems are often sites where bias is both reflected and reinforced. Despite the continual development of the Getty’s Art and Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) this presentation highlights the failure of the AAT in representing, in depth, underrepresented art forms. This presentation expands, illustrating how critical race theory can be utilized as a framework that identifies the underrepresentation of graffiti in the AAT as racial bias.

Mari Khasmanyan, UC Santa Barbara
“On Mission: Forging Community Through San Francisco’s Chicano Print Collections”

San Francisco’s iconic Mission Gráfica and La Raza Graphics print collections were a major addition to the world-class Chicana/o Latino graphic print holdings of the UC Santa Barbara’s California Ethnic and Multicultural Archives. Challenges in acquiring, preserving, processing, and providing culturally relevant physical and digital access yield insights into understanding the Chicano/Latino visual arts movement.

Only current ARLIS/NA and VRA members may attend this event. Additional access approvals may be made on a case-by-case basis. Registration will close two hours before the start of the webinar. For assistance, please contact webinars@arlisna.org.

Michelle Wilson, ArLiSNAP Conference Liaison

Call for Proposals: ArLiSNAP/VREPS 2017 Virtual Conference

ArLiSNAP/VREPS 2017 Virtual Conference

Call for Proposals

ArLiSNAP (Art Library Students and New ARLIS Professionals) and VREPS (Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students) are joining forces to host a virtual conference this Fall! The conference, Critical Librarianship in the Arts, will take place at 1pm CST October 14, 2017. The conference will consist of a keynote speaker followed by 1.5 to 2 hours of presentations by students and new professionals. This is an excellent opportunity for those who cannot be physically present at our annual conferences to share projects and ideas.

Our keynote speaker will be Jennifer Ferretti. Jennifer is the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the Maryland Institute College of Art. She is well-known for her “Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ and Information Resources” Libguide, which offers different types of resources to interpret and view Beyonce’s visual album “Lemonade” through multiple lens. We have invited her to talk about Critical Librarianship in the Arts and what it means to her.

We are looking for students and new professionals with an interest in art librarianship or visual resources management to present their work. The theme for this year’s conference is focused on critical librarianship in the arts. As defined on critlib.org, critical librarianship is “a movement of library workers dedicated to bringing social justice principles into our work in libraries.” Do you have an example of critical librarianship through art that you would like to discuss? Or a unique perspective on how the arts could fight social justice? Submit your proposal, and add your voice to our discussion on the future of the field!

 

Requirements:

  1. Presenters must be MLIS students or new professionals with fewer than five years of experience in the field.
  2. Presentations will be between ten and fifteen minutes in length.
  3. Presenters need to be available for a live presentation and brief Q&A session on the afternoon of October 14, 2017. Presenters need to be available for a practice session the week before to test equipment. A date and time for the practice session will be determined at a later date.

Submit your proposal via this link by Thursday, August 31st.

If you have any questions about this event, please don’t hesitate to contact the ArLiSNAP Co-Moderators, Courtney Baron, courtneylbaron@gmail.com, and Breanne Crumpton, becrumpton@gmail.com.

Best,

ArLiSNAP and VREPS

Announcing the ArLiSNAP/VREPS 2017 Virtual Conference

ArLiSNAP (Art Library Students and New ARLIS Professionals) and VREPS (Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students) are joining forces to host a virtual conference this May! The conference, Critical Librarianship in the Arts, will take place at 1pm CST October 14, 2017.

Our Keynote Speaker will be Jennifer Ferretti, the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the Maryland Institute College of Art.

The conference will consist of a keynote speaker followed by 1.5 to 2 hours of presentations by students and new professionals. This is an excellent opportunity for those who cannot be physically present at our annual conferences to share projects and ideas.

The Call for Proposals will be sent out next week.

 

STAY TUNED!!

Head, Reference Services | National Gallery of Canada

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Job Summary

Provides knowledge of and access to the Library’s collections and related external resources by planning, implementing, delivering and monitoring all aspects of those public service programs designed to meet the research and reference requirements of National Gallery of Canada staff and external clientele. Participates in the development of the Library collections and research resources, including the main collection, the rare book collection, the artists’ books and multiples collection, and the documentation collection. Supervises circulation, interlibrary loan, stack maintenance and photocopying and scanning services.

MAIN DUTIES:
The Head of Reference Services is responsible for all aspects of public services programming for the main Library collections. Working in consultation with the Chief, Library, Archives and Research Fellowship Program, the Head of Reference Services:

– Provides general and advanced reference services and orientation to National Gallery of Canada curatorial and research staff, visiting research fellows, external researchers and scholars, and the general public;
– Plans, implements, and administers policies and procedures for reference activities including circulation and interlibrary loan services;
– Develops and promotes online services and resources;
– Supervises the Reference staff and supports and encourages their professional development;
– Represents and promotes the collections and services of the Library and Archives through outreach activities including: participation in the Library and Archives exhibition program, the publication program (Occasional Papers series), and in professional organizations at local, national and international venues;
– Develops the reference collection and participates in the development of the Library and Archives’ collections and resources, including the main collection, the rare book collection, the artists’ books and multiples collection, and the documentation collection, in accordance with the Library’s mandate and acquisition policy;
– Ensures the preservation and security of Library collections during their storage and use.


Requirements

• Master of Library and Information Studies (MLIS) degree from an ALA-accredited program.
• Master’s or undergraduate degree in Art History or a related discipline is preferred.
• Five years of professional experience working as a public service or reference librarian in an academic or research library, preferably an art library.
• Familiarity with the major bibliographic tools (print and electronic) and research methods for Art History.
• Excellent verbal and written communication skills, and interpersonal skills to work effectively with a wide range of staff and patrons.
• Excellent presentation and public speaking skills.
• Strong commitment to public service.
• Familiarity with library standards, best-practice, library applications, computer systems, online databases, digital imaging technology, user access and image delivery technology.
• Experience working with websites.
• Supervisory experience is preferred.
• Knowledge of preservation and conservation practices and techniques to ensure that collections are well housed, stored, and handled.
• Flexibility and ability to react quickly and positively to change and the ability to accept challenges and create new opportunities.
• Excellent attention to detail and organizational skills.

Notice to Applicants: The Human Resources Department of the National Gallery of Canada, invite selected applicants for interviews by way of written communication via email as per the NGC Staffing Process. Should applicants opt to unsubscribe from receiving emails regarding employment in this organisation, please note that we will not be able to communicate with you to participate in the interview process.

We encourage applicants to update their career profiles, ensure Email Communication Consent preferences are set to allow emails and check email junk/spam folders regularly.


Condition of Employment

Must meet the bilingual requirement to be invited to the interview process.
Reliability Status – this factor is not used at the pre-selection stage.


Additional Information

• A variety of assessment tools will be used to assess candidates;
• The National Gallery of Canada is committed to having a skilled, diversified workforce reflective of Canadian society. As a result, it promotes employment equity and encourages candidates to indicate voluntarily in their application if they are a woman, an Aboriginal person, a person with a disability or a member of a visible minority group;
• The Gallery is committed to developing inclusive, barrier-free selection processes and work environment. Alternative selection tool methods and/or reasonable accommodation are available upon request;
• Candidates are entitled to participate in the selection process in the official language of their choice.

Apply: http://ow.ly/zYV230c1xmr

Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Summer Internships

The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center is providing two paid internships for the summer.

Oral history intern:

Objective:  To create a video oral history of (an) individual(s) who knew Georgia O’Keeffe in Amarillo and Canyon, Texas for the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum and an additional edited 5-minute summary video that will have a depth and range of recollections/memories of this individual and help researchers and visitors to the Museum gain a fuller understanding of Georgia O’Keeffe.  All of the contents from the internship – the full interview, the 5-minute video, photographs, and all supplementary material – will be added to the archives of the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.  One of the key learning experiences is to understand how oral histories are utilized in museums.  This internship will be based in West Texas.

Skills desired:  research, documentary film/journalism, studio art – photography, computer (MS Office), Documentation, general writing, self-motivation and ability to work independently

 

RC Garden Research intern:

Objective:  To research the plants and trees in the Research Center garden in order to provide content for future tours of the RC garden space.  Content includes:  historical information about plants and their use in New Mexico, botanical information about each of the plants, and as well as context of O’Keeffe’s love of gardening and use of plants as subject matter in her paintings.  Final product will be a draft of text for an audio guide.  May be required to drive to Abiquiu home and studio to conduct research about gardens in that space.  One of the key learning experiences is to understand how research is utilized by museums for the visitor experience.

Skills desired:  research, computer (databases/data entry), computer (MS Office), documentation, general writing, science background with knowledge of plants and gardening, interest in the arts, self-motivation and ability to work independently

 

Further information can be found here:  https://www.okeeffemuseum.org/about-the-museum/opportunities/internship-opportunities/.  The internships are listed under the BF Foundation.