Collection Strategy Librarian, Art & Art History and Design Emphasis, San Jose State University (Reposted)

Location
San Jose, CA
Open Date
Feb 16, 2018

Description
Subject to Budgetary Approval
University Library

Specialization: Collection Strategy Librarian, Art & Art History and Design Emphasis

Job Opening ID (JOID): 24466

Rank: Senior Assistant Librarian (Tenure-track)

The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library seeks an innovative and creative librarian to provide leadership in the area of collection strategy. Under the direction of the Director of Academic Services, the Collection Strategy Librarian will collaborate with faculty, library staff, and students to provide guidance in the development, management, delivery, assessment, and planning of the library’s digital and print collections. As a faculty member, the candidate participates in the library liaison program and engages in library and university governance and scholarship, which includes research, scholarly, and creative activities required for tenure and promotion. The Collection Strategy Librarian will serve as the liaison to the Departments of Art & Art History and Design.

Responsibilities:

Under the direction of the Director of Academic Services, leads collection development activities including assessment, selection, and deselection of print, non-print, electronic resources, and gifts in all subject areas.
As part of the Academic Services team, develops the collection management, preservation, and deselection strategy.
Coordinates collection development and selection activities of liaison librarians.
Work with relevant stakeholders in developing collection development policies, evaluating print and electronic material purchases, and providing disciplinary collection assessment and statistical analysis and reports.
Establishes and maintains a strong collaborative relationship with all library units that build and maintain digital and physical collections.
Represents and participates in cooperative collection development programs with other libraries and library consortia.
Develops and maintains an awareness of the trends and issues affecting collection management and development.
Builds a record of progressive scholarly and professional achievement to fulfill the University requirement of retention, tenure and promotion.
Participates in the library liaison program, providing services to the departments of Art & Art History and Design.
Candidate must address the needs of a student population of great diversity – in age, cultural background, ethnicity, primary language and academic preparation

Required Qualifications:

Minimum 2 years of experience in selecting library materials
Experience serving as a liaison to academic programs/departments
Master’s degree from an ALA accredited program or equivalent is required at time of appointment.
Knowledge of planning, designing, and implementing innovative practices or tools to improve collection development and maintenance.
Experience with collection analysis and assessment of print and electronic resources.
Familiarity with a collections budget and collection-related projects.
Excellent analytical, interpersonal, time management, organizational and problem-solving skills.
Applicants should demonstrate awareness of and sensitivity to educational goals of a multicultural population as might have been gained in cross-cultural study, training, teaching and other comparable experience

Preferred Qualifications:

Demonstrated ability to apply metrics and other evaluation criteria to support data-driven collection development decisions.
Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively on collection building and management in a rapidly changing information environment.
Experience or coursework with library resources relevant to the research, teaching, and learning of art, art history, or design.
Undergraduate or graduate degree or equivalent training/work experience in art, art history, or design.
Proficiency with an ILS system and analytics.
Proficiency with Excel or other spreadsheet/reporting platforms.

Salary Range: Commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Starting Date: Summer 2018.

Eligibility: Employment is contingent upon proof of eligibility to work in the United States.

Please include Job Opening ID (JOID) on all correspondence.

Application Instructions
Application Procedures: For full consideration, submit: (1) a letter of interest; (2) curriculum vitae; (3) statement of teaching interests/philosophy; (4) research plan; and (5) names of three professional references with contact information by April 6, 2018 via apply.interfolio.com/49032. This position will remain open until filled.

Important: This item will be required of finalists at the time of on-campus visit: (1) Original, sealed, graduate school transcripts. Mailing address: SJSU, King Library; Attention: Evelia Sanchez; One Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95192-0028.

Tracy Elliott, Dean, University Library, invites you to contact us with your questions at (408) 808-2080 or via email at library-jobs@sjsu.edu. Please visit our websites at http://www.sjsu.edu and library.sjsu.edu. For information on faculty retention, tenure and promotion, see the SJSU Academic Senate policies S15-7 & S15-8 at http://www.sjsu.edu/senate/policies/pol_chron/

The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library at San José State University is recognized as an innovative shared facility combining a large academic library (with a collection of over one million items) and a major downtown public library. This facility uses a merged service model to support the lifelong learning needs of academic and public library users. The University Library’s strategic plan is to build a digital library which will “aggressively increase access, creation, and use of digital collections,” and “will creatively utilize innovative technologies to provide the University and the broader community with a 21st century library environment, both physical and digital.”

San José State University is California’s oldest public institution of higher learning. The campus is located on the southern end of San Francisco Bay in downtown San José (Pop. 1,000,000), hub of the world-famous Silicon Valley high-technology research and development center. Many of California’s most popular national, recreational, and cultural attractions are nearby. A member of the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system, San José State University enrolls approximately 35,000 students, a significant percentage of whom are members of ethno-cultural minority groups. The Library – and the University of which it is a part – is committed to increasing the diversity of its faculty so our community can benefit from multiple perspectives.

 

Original posting: https://apply.interfolio.com/49032

Media Preservation Librarian, Michigan State University Libraries

Description
Reporting to the Head of Conservation and Preservation and working with staff in the Digital and Multimedia Center, G. Robert Vincent Voice Library, Special Collections and the Wallace Conservation Laboratory, as well as other library units and partners at other institutions, the Media Preservation Librarian will:

  • Plan, develop and provide leadership for a media preservation program for Library digital and analog collections, including the Vincent Voice Library, Rovi Media Collection and other special collections, by reviewing existing library practices and analyzing needs and establishing policies and best practices that promote long-term stewardship and access to audio visual and moving image materials.
  • Identify and work with vendors and complete RFPs for media conversion services; manage the inventory, shipping and quality control process.
  • Review and advise on media acquisitions and collaborate on conservation and survey efforts.
  • Identify and collaborate with technical and accessibility partners within the library, campus and consortial communities.
  • Provide support for the Libraries’ overall preservation program by assisting with environmental monitoring, the integrated pest management program, and the Libraries’ Disaster Response Committee and other preservation activities.

The successful candidate must be broadly focused and adventurous enough to expand or shift their range of responsibilities to meet evolving campus needs, as well as participate approximately quarter-time in a secondary assignment based on the needs of the library and candidate interests and qualifications. Potential secondary assignments could, for example, include work with special collections, metadata services or collection development.

Librarians are appointed as regular faculty in a continuing appointment system and are engaged in professional development and scholarly activities related to their position. Additionally, librarians serve on library and university committees as elected or assigned.

Michigan State University Libraries serve more than 4,900 faculty, 36,000 undergraduates and 11,000 graduate and professional students on a park-like campus of over 5,000 acres. The MSU Libraries have combined holdings of over 6 million volumes with renowned collections in music, film, agriculture, Africana and comic art and cutting-edge services including a makerspace and digital scholarship lab. The Libraries are home to both the Rovi Media Collection, one of the largest publicly accessible media collections in the world, and the G. Robert Vincent Voice Library, a collection of over 40,000 hours of spoken word recordings dating back to 1888. East Lansing is a vibrant community of 50,000 located adjacent to Lansing, the State capital.


RequirementsMinimum Qualifications

Master’s degree in information or library science from a program accredited by the American Library Association. Knowledge of or experience with media and library preservation. Excellent oral and written communication skills; outstanding interpersonal communication skills including the ability to be flexible in a dynamic and changing environment; exceptional commitment to customer service; ability to work enthusiastically and effectively with diverse faculty, students and staff; ability to work collaboratively and independently; ability to prioritize and balance various unit needs; attention to detail; preparation and commitment to engage in scholarly activity consistent with a library faculty appointment; capacity and commitment to engage independently in continuing professional development.

Desired Qualifications

Familiarity with production, archiving or preserving complex digital objects; knowledge of current library preservation best practices for books, paper and photographic collections; knowledge of best practice for cleaning repair, migrating or rehousing audio visual and moving image materials; knowledge of disaster recovery techniques for media; broad understanding of current trends and tools for sustainability, integrity, authenticity and risk assessment; knowledge of standards-based metadata schema such as MODS, METS and PREMIS. File migration and media conversion practice; use of programming languages such as Python; understanding of the grant-writing process, knowledge of accessibility as it relates to media and media preservation.

Original posting: http://careers.msu.edu/cw/en-us/job/498817/librarian-icontinuing

The Dual-Degree Art Librarian: Survey and Guide for Career Planning (by Autumn Wetli & Sarah Bilotta)

Whether or not a second Master’s, or perhaps even a PhD, is needed for the subject specialist librarian is an area of debate. We have decided to think about this conversation specifically in the terms of Art Librarianship. Gathered are some pros and cons to getting the advanced degree in art/art history, formulated from the thoughts of fellow ArLiSNAP followers and some scholarly articles on the subject.

For the purposes of informally ascertaining a consensus among early career art librarians or those interested in the field, we conducted some preliminary research with scholarly materials that address the educational requirements for professional art librarian jobs, as well as the opinions of more established art librarians. We then used this research as inspiration to formulate methods for engaging the perspectives of new and emerging art librarians. This culminated in circulating an open-ended question to evoke the thoughts and opinions of our colleagues, both via e-mail with librarians we have worked with and through the e-mail listserv of ArLiSNAP. In order to achieve varied and unrestricted opinions, we solicited feedback on the basis that we were curious to hear about colleagues’ experiences in the field in relation to this topic in a broad sense. All respondents were informed that this information would be used for an ArLiSNAP blog post (with the option to remain anonymous). For this survey and the resultant blog article, “subject Master’s degree” and “second Master’s degree” are intended to refer to a Master’s degree in a subject other than librarianship, obtained before, after, or in conjunction with a librarianship Master’s degree, and meant to bolster the scholarly research capabilities of a librarian in the field of the arts and design.

From the results of this survey, we have drawn conclusions not necessarily about the overarching value (or lack thereof) of the subject Master’s degree to the field of art librarianship, but about individual librarians’ experiences with or without a subject Master’s degree and patterns among this small sample of librarians, which may be indicative of trends warranting either further study or consideration for librarians who are considering a second Master’s degree.

From the nine responses we received from our call out for opinions, four individuals have a Master’s degree in a subject other than librarianship and five do not. Of the five respondents who do not have a second Master’s degree, two have completed partial coursework towards a second Master’s degree and one is currently applying to dual degree programs.

Responses from our survey

PROS

Research Experience
“[Getting a second Master’s degree] is a rewarding experience…something that has come in very handy as an academic librarian.”
-Librarian with a second Master’s

“I think I would consider pursuing a second Master’s degree to not only further my understanding of the field, but also have a better grasp on the type of research [that] is done at the graduate level by participating in it myself.”
-Librarian with a Master’s degree in librarianship, but without a subject Master’s

“…the [Master’s degree in Art History] provided me with appropriate knowledge of arts and art history subject areas; resources, tools, and methodologies; and vocabulary to meet the requirements of the co-op role, and that experience has been invaluable for shaping my readiness to enter the workforce in art librarianship.”
-Librarian with a Master’s degree in Art History, currently working on MLIS

“[Getting a subject Master’s degree] is a rewarding experience and really helped me learn how to sculpt a scholarly research project, something that has come in very handy as an academic librarian.”
-Librarian with an arts-related subject Master’s degree, currently working on MLIS

Job Possibilities
“I have held two professional librarian positions since graduating from library school, and both asked for an Art History MA as a preferred requirement.”
-Librarian with MLIS and MA in Art History

“…feedback [from others in the art librarianship field] has consistently been a positive assertion that having the two degrees will help me have a competitive edge in the job search.”
-Librarian with a Master’s degree in Art History, currently working on MLIS

“My current job does not require the second masters, but other positions I might be interested in down the line do require it for promotion…”
-Librarian with MLIS and partial coursework towards MA in Art History

Enhanced Opportunities for Professional Development
“Though I have yet to determine if — or how — having a second, subject specific Master’s will help my career in art librarianship, I can say that it has had a strong influence in my professional development throughout the MLIS program.”
-Librarian with a Master’s degree in Art History, currently working on MLIS

“[Having a subject Master’s degree] has gone a long way to gaining acceptance and interest from members of professional organizations that cover the intersection of arts and librarianship.”
-Librarian with an arts-related subject Master’s degree, currently working on MLIS

Strengthened Relationships with Art Scholars

“…it’s always helpful for an academic librarian to have a second master’s degree or even PhD. It can go a long way in your ability to gain respect or trust from faculty and administration.”
-Librarian with MLIS, previously enrolled in MA program in Art History

“I definitely find it easier to be an art & design librarian without an extra Master’s than I think I might serving art history [faculty].”
-Librarian with MLIS but no subject Master’s degree

“Having an advanced degree helps when you are working with senior scholars, whether curators or university academics.”
-Librarian with MA in Art History and Master’s degree in Librarianship

CONS

Cost
“[Enrollment in Master’s degree program in Art History] was costing a fortune, and I knew my loan debt was already staggering.”
-Librarian with MLIS and partial coursework towards MA in Art History

“To me the biggest reason not to get a second master’s was the money. I wasn’t sure that the investment would be necessary or pay off sufficiently to warrant the debt.”
-Librarian with MLIS but no subject Master’s degree

“If I could go back and do it again, the only thing I would change is lowering the amount of student loans I took out…Luckily I qualify for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program because I work for a university, but who knows what will happen with that program in the near future…”
-Librarian with MLIS and MA in Art History

A Degree is Only What You Make of It
“I do think it’s a challenge to find a good position in the field regardless of whether you pursue the second degree.”
-Librarian with MLIS but no subject Master’s degree

“I think the more you do and achieve, the higher your chances will be for potentially landing that ideal position you’ve got your sights set on…”
-Librarian currently applying to Master’s degree programs

“…having served on a few search committees now, I can say that it’s not necessarily the education that gets you the job, but rather the way you present yourself and articulate the ways in which you can/have applied that education to a practical position as a librarian.”
-Librarian with MLIS and MA in Art History

Not All Art Librarian Positions Require a Subject Master’s

“[A second Master’s degree] is not required for my current role where I lead the library’s instruction program and work with a variety of subject areas.”
-Librarian with MLIS, previously enrolled in MA program in Art History

“[In my current position] the second Master’s is less needed because I’m not being asked to help with graduate level research. So in general, I think it depends on your position and the level of research you are expected to help with.”
-Librarian with MLIS but no subject Master’s degree

Responses in the Literature
In addition to reaching out to our colleagues, we looked at a couple articles that performed studies on the MLIS and an advanced subject degree. This was not an exhaustive search into the literature on this topic, but rather, a very brief look into the results of a couple similar surveys. Much like the results of our own informal survey, the importance of a second advanced subject degree, really depends on the individual and should be evaluated on case-by-case scenarios.

Echoing responses we heard from ArLiSNAP followers, one of pros of an advanced-subject degree was found in its ability to make the librarian a better researcher than if they had just pursued the MLIS. This helps the librarian in two ways. First, it better prepares them for research and publication of their own, which can help with career advancement in regards to tenure and/or promotion (Mayer & Terrill, 2005, p. 68). Secondly, the librarian has first-hand research experience that many patrons, perhaps particularly graduate students and faculty, need (ibid.) One article made an interesting note, that from their research, the demand for second masters or advanced degrees was found to be most desirable for library administrators (Ferguson, 2016, p. 732).

Many School of Information programs offer dual degrees, which allow students to receive the a second, subject specialized Master, at less cost and time than pursuing the MA/MS solely on its own. Art History as a second Masters is commonly a part of these programs. A few programs that offer such are The University of North Carolina, Indiana University Bloomington, Pratt Institute, and Kent State University.

References

Ferguson, J. (2016). Additional degree required: advanced subject knowledge and academic librarianship. Libraries and the Academy, 16(4), 721-736. Retrieved from https://muse.jhu.edu/article/632342

Mayer, J. & Terrill, L. J. (2005). Academic librarians’ attitudes about advanced-subject degrees. College & Research Libraries, 66(1), 59-70. https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.66.1.59

Library Technical Associate – Digital Imaging Technician and Photographer – The University of Texas at Austin

Hiring department:  Humanities Rsch Ctr
Monthly salary:  $3,083+ depending on qualifications
Hours per week:  40.00 Standard from 800AM to 500PM
Posting number: 18-01-25-02-8083
Job Status: Open
FLSA status: Non-exempt
Earliest Start Date: 03/01/2018
Position Duration: Funding expected to continue
Position open to all applicants
Location: Austin (main campus)
Number of vacancies: 1

General Notes

The Harry Ransom Center welcomes qualified candidates who can demonstrate a commitment to diversity.

Required Application Materials

  • A Resume is required in order to apply
  • A Letter of Interest is required in order to apply.
  • A List of 3 References is required in order to apply.

Additional Information

Purpose

To manage all aspects of image creation in the Center’s photography studio, including reformatting of analog materials to digital format, operation and maintenance of software and hardware, creation of digital imaging workflows, and record keeping and documentation.

Essential Functions

Assesses reformatting needs and performs reformatting of two-and three-dimensional library, archival, and museum materials such as books, manuscripts, works of art on paper, and costumes using digital cameras and other document capture equipment, including the BC100 and RGC180. Advises on best arrangement of materials to be photographed or angle of shots to produce desired results. Handles fragile and rare collection materials under established best practices. Ensures quality control of digital images. Performs color correction and image enhancement for digital images; monitors, calibrates, and adjusts settings on hardware and software tools as needed; processes and prepares digital files for archiving, printing, and access. Works with the Digital Projects Librarian and/or other staff to create, revise, and align production workflows; creates and maintains documentation. Maintains hardware and software; troubleshoots hardware and software; provides technical support. Provides photography support for the Center’s internal activities, including public affairs, publications, and exhibitions programs. Trains, supervises, and reviews work of student staff in the Studio. Consults and serves as a resource for staff on issues of digitization and the use of imaging hardware and software, as needed. Other duties as assigned.

Marginal/Incidental functions

Other related functions as assigned.

Required qualifications

High school graduation or GED and three years of work experience. Demonstrated experience with digital photography and digital reformatting. Good organizational, communication, and interpersonal skills. Ability to work independently and as a team member. Equivalent combination of relevant education and experience may be substituted as appropriate. Equivalent combination of relevant education and experience may be substituted as appropriate.

Preferred Qualifications

Bachelor’s degree. Experience working in, or management of, a professional photography studio or digitization lab. Advanced knowledge of digital imaging software and hardware. Familiarity with Macintosh operating system. Familiarity with Capture One and Adobe Photoshop. Familiarity with handling fragile library, archival, and museum materials. Excellent attention to detail and problem-solving skills.

Working conditions

May work around standard office conditions May work around electrical and mechanical hazards Repetitive use of a keyboard at a workstation Use of manual dexterity Lifting and moving

View original job posting: https://utdirect.utexas.edu/apps/hr/jobs/nlogon/180125028083

Harnessing Data Visualization to Teach Emerging Art Scholars: Methods and Ideas for Instruction

As art librarians and students, we are especially aware of how digital resources and the Internet have changed art scholarship. I find myself recommending academic streaming music databases to performing arts students who, ten years ago, would have had access only to CD recordings; For a close-up look at The Scream painted by Edvard Munch, I send students to Artstor before digging out a print catalog; When developing library instruction sessions, I nearly always use a digital presentation component like Google Slides or a video tutorial hosted by Vimeo or YouTube. But, one of the emerging digital trends in academia that I find most engrossing is data visualization or information visualization.

As Autumn Wetli discussed in her ArLiSNAP article The Practice and Problems of Digital Art History, several digital programs exist that allow art historians to analyze research text, data, or image collections and then present visual representations of that information or findings therein (Wetli, 2017). This is data visualization. Elegantly explained by data visualization specialist Alberto Cairo, a visualization is “a graphical representation designed to enable exploration, analysis, and communication” (Cairo, 2017).

 

For art researchers, the application of data visualization in a digital environment offers infinite possibilities. Graphs, charts, data maps, and other visualizations, when incorporated into research, can make an article more appealing or make an argument more persuasive (Cairo, 2017). And, in the age of interactive and socially engaging digital media, scholars who study art are at a unique advantage to produce colorful, media-rich, graphically stunning visualizations. (Glassman & Dyki, 2017).

 

Apart from the potential of art scholars to integrate images of art into their visualizations, the changing nature of scholarly publishing in the fine arts signals an era of change for how data is represented in art scholarship and how art researchers can move forward in an informed way. In a 2017 article entitled “Beyond the monograph? Transformations in scholarly communication and their impact on art librarianship,” Patrick Tomlin details many of these changes. Digital models of publication present an advantage due to the potential for institutions to take greater control of internal publishing, the benefit of open access, the increasing cost of full-color print monographs, and the growing importance of search engine discovery (Tomlin, 2017). From the perspectives of emerging art librarians who will take an active role in research and instruction, having a basic understanding of data visualization and its increasing presence in the world of digital art history is crucial.

 

To facilitate a basic understanding of how one might introduce data visualization to new art scholars, I have compiled this guide. These ideas serve as an introduction to data visualization for both the librarian and the researcher, who together can learn to apply existing knowledge of art scholarship towards this goal.

 

First: It is advantageous for the instruction librarian to introduce (or re-introduce) students to the principles of visual literacy. To create one’s own visualizations, scholars should be well-versed in visual communication. Online tools like Image Atlas may serve to prepare students to understand bias and perspective in images (Bailey & Pregill, 2014, p. 183). I will link below to a 2012 article by Tammy Ravas and Megan Stark which provides an informative case study in teaching “the ethics of seeing” (Ravas & Stark, 2012, p. 41). Instructors may find that integrating visual literacy lessons into existing information literacy lesson plans bolsters students’ understanding of visual literacy when applied to the eventual creation of their own data visualizations (Ravas & Stark, 2012, p. 35).

 

Second: Just as digital art history scholars should be visually literate, they should also be data literate. In his 2017 lecture at the Cornell University Library, Alberto Cairo details a study from the Pew Research Center, which concludes that many people who read articles that contain data visualizations do not know how to correctly read scatter plots, bar graphs, and line charts (Cairo, 2017). Though this study focuses upon popular media, the importance of an understanding of the interpretation of data can not be understated for scholarly communities. In a 2012 article in Art Documentation, Victoria Szabo emphasizes the value of data literate art historians who know how to use and organize data. She states that “Faculty and staff technical advisors sometimes unfamiliar with the research domain, even if experienced in humanities collaborations more generally, may not realize the extent to which their biases and assumptions for how to clean and standardize data could compromise the intellectual integrity of a project. Variant spellings, for example, could be important in tracing the provenance of a particular art object” (Szabo, 2012, p. 171). Interdepartmental collaborations with information technology staff may allow librarians and art faculty to learn more about data management programs, software, methods, and training.

 

Third: Creating one’s own data visualizations does not mean learning how to program Java or code HTML. For art historians who are just learning how to create visualizations, there are a number of free programs which exist to assist them. It may be beneficial to design instructional lesson plans around visualization software with which students are already familiar. I would suggest choosing a sample research topic within a class curriculum to be plotted in Google Maps. Topics like “locations of art auction houses in Paris” or “art galleries in New York during the Harlem Renaissance” may serve to develop simple exercises that illicit broader understandings of in-class research. Paul Glassman and Judy Dyki’s Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship, 2nd edition, contains several resources on using map plotting in art history research.

 

Once students have outgrown this more familiar tool, they can move on to greater objectives, like creating visualizations using the immense capabilities of Google Charts. They can practice embedding these visualizations into Wikis, LibGuides, or social media. And, they can explore increasingly sophisticated tools like ImagePlot while developing their comfort level with visualization technology.

 

Data visualization may seem like a daunting undertaking for researchers who have been educated mostly in text-based scholarship. But, the implications of having an understanding of visualizations in digital art history are immense. For art librarians who are increasingly tasked with the education of scholars in a digital field, I hope that the tools and ideas I have outlined may provide a basis of knowledge for teaching this emerging technology. I truly believe that, if introduced to the field of data visualization within the parameters of their understanding of visual literacy, data, and art scholarship, researchers will learn to be excited about the potential of data visualization to enhance and embellish their research work.

 

Bibliography/Further Reading

 

Bailey, J., & Pregill, L. (2014). Speak to the Eyes: The History and Practice of Information Visualization. Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, 33(2), 168-191. doi:10.1086/678525

 

Cairo, A. (2017, October 13). Visual Trumpery. Lecture presented at Cornell University Library, Ithaca, New York. Retrieved January 2, 2018, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EnzNfPAzCSc

 

Glassman, P., & Dyki, J. (Eds.). (2017). The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship (2nd ed.). Chicago, IL: ALA Neal-Schuman.

 

Ravas, T., & Stark, M. (2012). Pulitzer Prize Winning Photographs and Visual Literacy at The University of Montana. Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, 31(1), 34-44. doi:10.1086/665334

 

Szabo, V. (2012). Transforming Art History Research with Database Analytics: Visualizing Art Markets. Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, 31(2), 158-175. doi:10.1086/668109

 

Tomlin, P. (2017). Beyond the monograph? Transformations in scholarly communication and their impact on art librarianship. In The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship (2nd ed., pp. 213-224). Chicago, IL: ALA Neal-Schuman.

 

Wetli, A. (2017, December 22). The Practice and Problems of Digital Art History [Web log post]. Retrieved January 4, 2018, from http://arlisnap.arlisna.org/2017/12/the-practice-and-problems-of-digital-art-history/

Special Collections Archivist II, The Getty Research Institute

Requisition Number: 2017-3088
Position Status: Regular Full-Time
Salaried/Hourly: Salaried
Category: Library
Getty Location: Getty Center
Program/Dept.: GRI – 0420-Collections Management

Job Summary

The Getty Research Institute (GRI) seeks a motivated and knowledgeable archivist to process and catalog special collections with an emphasis on archives related to modern and contemporary art, including the archives of artists, collectors, dealers and critics. The GRI is dedicated to furthering knowledge and advancing understanding of the visual arts and their histories. The Research Institute’s special collections contain rare books, prints and drawings, rare photographs, 20th-century art multiples, extensive audiovisual material, and more than 25,000 linear feet of archives and manuscripts. Reporting to the Manager of Special Collections Cataloging and Processing, the archivist will work closely with colleagues throughout the Research Institute, and may supervise interns, student workers and project staff. The archivist may also contribute to scholarly and social media activities related to special collections.

Major Job Responsibilities

  • Surveys collections of advanced-to-high complexity
  • Develops and implements processing plans
  • Arranges, processes, and re-houses collection materials
  • Creates and enhances finding aids and bibliographic records based on current standards, best practices, research, and analysis
  • Applies advanced knowledge to edit, aggregate, enhance, transform, and disseminate existing metadata
  • Identifies conservation concerns and performs basic preservation practices
  • Maintains knowledge in standards, best practices, and specialized subjects, formats and systems
  • Tests new processes and procedures
  • May train and supervise others or revise the work of others
  • May answer reference questions
  • May research, write, present, and publish about collections and work activities
  • May contribute to outreach activities
  • Undertakes special projects as assigned

Qualifications

    • Graduate degree in Library and Information Studies from an ALA-accredited library school, Art History, or a related discipline
    • Minimum 2 years of professional experience
    • Requires advanced subject, language, and/or technical expertise

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities

  • Demonstrated subject knowledge in art history, modern and contemporary art preferred
  • Strong reading knowledge of at least one foreign language
  • Strong writing and communication skills
  • Ability to work both independently and collaboratively
  • Ability to work in team-based and collaborative environments
  • Ability to lift and move 40 pounds
  • Ability to climb ladders
  • Knowledge of standards such as DACS, EAD, MARC, and RDA preferred
  • Experience with ArchivesSpace or other collection management systems preferred
  • Familiarity with digital materials management and transformation preferred

Link to original job posting: https://jobs-getty.icims.com/jobs/3088/special-collections-archivist-ii/job

Training Student Reference Assistants in the Academic Art Library: Tips for New Supervisors

With an abundance of paraprofessional and professional positions in art librarianship requiring supervisory responsibilities, newly graduated librarians may find themselves navigating the confusing territory of “recent former student supervising students.” Especially in academic art libraries, professional and paraprofessional staff must be responsible for cataloging, reference, outreach, and collection development, and thus try to maximize their availability by calling upon student employees to staff the circulation desk. Student workers, especially undergraduates, are likely hired under the presumption that they will handle beginner-level tasks such as checking books out, shelving, and labeling. However, in my experience the opposite has been true. When a student is the first point of contact at the circulation desk of a library, they will inevitably be faced with reference questions – and if there is not a librarian in close proximity, they should be prepared to answer those questions appropriately.

While in graduate school I read an article detailing the impact of student reference assistants in music libraries, and it stayed with me as I supervised student employees in an academic performing arts library. In this article from the journal Notes, Beth Christensen, Mary Du Mont, and Alan Green undertake a survey of music library reference services and conclude that “…heavy reliance on student employees may have a negative effect on the overall success of answering reference questions in music libraries,” referring specifically to the high level of patron dissatisfaction associated with assistance received from student employees (2001, p. 47). Due to the many similarities between searching for music resources and searching for art resources (multimedia formats, complex metadata, foreign language resources, copyright roadblocks, and more), the same may be true for visual arts libraries. As a result, I have gathered a few of my thoughts on preparing student reference assistants–specifically undergraduate students–for success.

We have all been warned that the reference desk is a dying concept. As research librarians become more mobile, we find ourselves better suited to embedded environments like classrooms and lecture halls. But, no matter where we find ourselves, we will always need someone to be back in the library, staffing the circulation desk. That person is often a student. I currently work in an all-undergraduate school, which means that our circulation desk students are just starting to learn how to do their own academic research, yet we are entrusting them with the ability to answer reference questions from their peers. For a new supervisor managing front desk students, this can pose a challenge. We want to set our library up for success, and we want the face of our library to be someone with strong art subject knowledge. However, when the professional staff is limited and the expertise of subject librarians is maximized elsewhere, this is not always possible. This means entrusting students to conduct successful patron interactions and, when necessary, delegate. I have found that it is helpful to address student assistants at the beginning of their employment and advise them to seek out a librarian for any questions they do not feel comfortable answering. In my library we have even compiled a list of questions that students assistants should be able to answer and questions they should transfer to a supervisor. This type of list depends upon the policies of your institution, but I have found that having a clearly stated guide to which students can refer is helpful in encouraging an understanding of when to consult a librarian and when to be ambitious and try to answer a question on their own.

Knowing that many of your more ambitious students will still try to answer every question on their own, it is important to convey the complicated nature of searching for resources in the arts. Many of my students are discouraged that when they type a few keywords into the library catalog they do not immediately find the results that they expected. In order to provide student employees with the skills to correct their mistakes and the foresight to understand their own searching capabilities, it is beneficial to use each mistake as a teaching opportunity. If a student presents you with a list of failed search queries, take the time to show them why the query failed and how to improve their search strategies, rather than just doing the work for them. You may find that the next time they are faced with a difficult reference question, they will be more willing to come back to you for help, or if they are fast learners, they may figure out how to do it themselves. Allowing students the opportunity to develop a contextual understanding of how and why some search strategies work and others do not is crucial to success for a new researcher in the very complicated field of art librarianship.

Finally, prepare your students to be successful customer service representatives. Any student reference assistant should be able to provide a satisfactory response to any patron’s question, whether they know the answer or not. A trick that I learned while working as a library page in a public library is to instruct student employees that they are never allowed to say “no” to a patron. For example: If they search the catalog for a book title, and the title does not appear, instead of saying “No, we do not have that book,” they should think of a way to continue the conversation with the patron by offering them another solution such as “I do not see it in the catalog, but would you like me to ask the Librarian for help?” or “I do not think we own this book, but can I direct you to Interlibrary Loan?” There is no better resource for teaching your student employees this reference strategy than the American Library Association’s Guidelines for Behavioral Performance of Reference and Information Service Providers (which I will link to below). If you have any student employees who have worked in retail or public service, they may already have a strong understanding of how to politely handle patron inquiries, but if they are new to this type of work, referring frequently to this guide may help to guide them along the way.

The challenge of working with student reference assistants is inevitable. Not only do student employees often have varying ranges of comfort conducting information searches, but even if we hire the perfect prospective art major to sit at our circulation desk, chances are that this student will be graduating in a few years, and we will need to search for someone new. When we find ourselves in the role of “supervisor,” it is our responsibility to assure not only that we maximize our time spent training student employees, but that we graduate students who know more about research and information retrieval and can act as mentors to their peers.

Christensen, B., Du Mont, M., & Green, A. (2001). Taking Note: Assessing the Performance of Reference Service in Academic Music Libraries: A Progress Report. Notes, 58(1), 39-54. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/900862

 

Guidelines for Behavioral Performance of Reference and Information Service Providers. (2016, August 02). Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/rusa/resources/guidelines/guidelinesbehavioral

The Aspiring Academic Art Librarian: Decoding the Mystery of Tenure-Track Job Postings

If you are an art librarian or aspiring art librarian on the hunt for a job, you may have encountered a tenure-track job posting at some point in your search. When speaking to colleagues, friends, and peers in the field of art librarianship I have found that many emerging professionals find themselves unprepared to understand, or to market themselves as candidates for, these faculty status library jobs. For those librarians interested in pursuing academic work, a broad understanding of faculty librarianship can be beneficial in a multitude of ways. For these reasons, I have compiled a brief “beginner’s introduction” to faculty librarianship and applying for tenure-track library jobs, accompanied by a short bibliography of web resources for the job-hunting academic art librarian.

Firstly, if you are unfamiliar with the academic process of tenure, a description of this process is available through the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). This can be found in the accompanying bibliography. You may also find the ACRL’s Joint Statement on on Faculty Status of College and University Librarians to be helpful. According to the latter, librarians who are hired into a tenure-track positions are afforded the opportunity to gain all the benefits of faculty status, including “corresponding entitlement to rank, promotion, tenure, compensation, leaves, and research funds” (“A Guideline for the Appointment, Promotion and Tenure of Academic Librarians,” 2006). This means that if seeking tenure-track library work, one should be prepared to engage in professional development activities and conduct research in their field of library expertise in exchange for the opportunity to achieve tenure status.

Secondly, if you are interested in applying to a tenure-track library position but want to know more about the responsibilities inherent in such a position, you should understand that the qualifications for rank, compensation, and promotion of tenure-track librarians vary widely from institution to institution. I took this opportunity to speak to three librarians at different stages in their careers (two in art librarianship and one in academic librarianship, but not the arts) in order to acquire a variety of examples of experiences with different institutions’ tenure policies. For the sake of privacy I have chosen to keep the names of my interviewees anonymous. All three of these librarians have found that each institution seems to have its own timeline for evaluations of tenure-track librarians. For example, one school might evaluate tenure-track librarians for promotion to tenure every three years while another might evaluate them every five years. During this review process the librarian hopes to be approved for tenure, but if not approved, risks termination. Research and professional development budgets, publishing requirements, and time allotted to conduct research also vary.

Thirdly, one must realize that within the field of librarianship there are many varying opinions on what faculty status means for librarians. Librarians who are interested in conducting research and publishing scholarly literature within the field are better suited to tenure-track positions than those who prefer not to be responsible for this type of work. Anyone can apply for these jobs, but there is no guarantee of achieving tenure status. Perhaps one of the most beneficial steps one can take before submitting an application to a tenure-track position is to seek out the tenure requirements and policies of the institution to which they are applying. These policies are frequently available on the institution’s website (though be sure to verify that you are reading the tenure requirements for librarians, and not for other faculty). These outlines can provide invaluable insight into whether the position in question is right for you.

General Resources

Academic Librarianship. (n.d.). Retrieved December 12, 2017, from https://www.kent.edu/iSchool/academic-librarianship

“A Guideline for the Appointment, Promotion and Tenure of Academic Librarians”, American Library Association, September 6, 2006.

“Association of College and Research Libraries Joint Statement on Faculty Status of College and University Librarians”, American Library Association, September 6, 2006.

Johnson, H. (2016, May 3). A Tip of the Hat to Tenure: Realizations in my First Year [Web log post]. Retrieved December 12, 2017, from http://acrlog.org/2016/05/03/a-tip-of-the-hat-to-tenure-realizations-in-my-first-year/

Romanowski, C. A. (2015). First-time faculty librarian, first year experience: Overcoming tenure fears. College & Research Libraries News, 76(11). Retrieved December 12, 2017, from http://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/article/view/9414/10616

“Securing an Academic Librarian Position”, American Library Association, November 10, 2009.

Sample Institutional Tenure Policies
 

Indiana University Bloomington

Penn State University Libraries

University at Albany, State Universities of New York

University of Georgia

TD Bank Financial Group Internship in Art Librarianship and Archive Practice (12 weeks), National Gallery of Canada

TD Bank Financial Group Internship in Art Librarianship and Archive Practice (12 weeks)

  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  

Job Summary

Generously supported by TD Bank Group (TD), these competitive, paid internships offer study and training opportunities and work experience in the field of:

Library
Archives

1 – Library: under the supervision of the Cataloguer, the intern will gain experience in cataloguing by participating in the cataloguing of a number of donation to the Library and Archives, including the Laura Brandon donation. At the same time, working with the Head of Reference Services, the intern will gain experience in Reference Services.
2- Archives: working with the Chief, Library, Archives and Research Fellowship Programs, Archivist and Collections Management, the intern will gain experience working with a museum collection management system to develop a profile within the system for archival material. In addition, working with the Archivist, the intern will gain experience sorting, analyzing, arranging, describing and creating a finding aid for archival donations to the Library and Archives.
Full training will be provided for the specific project. In addition, interns will receive a general overview of the activities of the Library and Archives, including introductions to programs in collections development, collections management, reference services, and archives management.
The TD Internship Program is designed to provide entrance-level professional development opportunities for students contemplating careers in the museum, library, or archives fields.

Internships will be for a term of 12 weeks, although the period can vary depending upon the requirements of both the candidate and the museum program involved.

Residency must be completed during the period January through 31 March 2018.

Internships are valued at $7,500 for the twelve-week term, and will be pro-rated in the case of approved shorter or longer periods of internship. Interns may be eligible for a discretionary $750 relocation allowance.

A performance/progress evaluation will be provided twice during the internship: an informal exchange at the fourth week to ensure that learning and project objectives are being met and to evaluate the satisfaction of both parties; the second evaluation will be more formal and will be conducted at the end of the internship – a written evaluation of the work done and the intern’s performance will be completed by the supervisor of the internship, the intern will prepare a report to assess the success of the internship for both the National Gallery and TD.


Requirements

– Candidates must have an undergraduate degree in art history, studio, or related discipline, and must have completed the first year of a community college diploma in library or archive technology, or the first year of the master’s degree in archives, library, and information management.

– candidates must be Canadian citizens or permanent residents legally entitled to work in Canada who are enrolled in or a graduate within the last two years, of a diploma or degree granting program;

– a curriculum vitae, including education, employment, awards and honours, 3 pages maximum;

– a cover letter, 2 pages maximum, which 1) states the relationship of the activity to the candidate’s course of study, career aspirations, and professional development; 2) outlines the candidate’s relevant experience; 3) indicates the candidate’s availability to conduct the internship;

– two letters of recommendation from previous or current employers and/or educational institutions, to be included in your application. These letters must address the candidate’s aptitudes and achievements, and assess the relevance of the internship to the candidate’s career development.

Applications will be reviewed by internal committees representing the Area of Study and consideration will be given to the relationship of the internship to the candidate’s professional development, the candidate’s academic standing, and the strength of the letters of recommendation.

Notice to Applicants: The Human Resources Department of the National Gallery of Canada, invite selected applicants for interviews by way of written communication via email as per the NGC Staffing Process. Should applicants opt to unsubscribe from receiving emails regarding employment in this organisation, please note that we will not be able to communicate with you to participate in the interview process.

We encourage applicants to update their career profiles, ensure Email Communication Consent preferences are set to allow emails and check email junk/spam folders regularly.


Condition of Employment

Enhanced reliability check – this factor is not used at the pre-selection stage.


Additional Information

• A variety of assessment tools may be used to assess candidates.
• The National Gallery of Canada is committed to having a skilled, diversified workforce reflective of Canadian society. As a result, it promotes employment equity and encourages candidates to indicate voluntarily in their application if they are a woman, an Aboriginal person, a person with a disability or a member of a visible minority group.
• The Gallery is committed to developing inclusive, barrier-free selection processes and work environment. Alternative selection tool methods and/or reasonable accommodation are available upon request.
• Candidates are entitled to participate in the selection process in the official language of their choice.


Assistant Archivist, The Charles M. Schulz Museum

The Charles M. Schulz Museum, a not-for-profit institution located in Santa Rosa, California, seeks a collaborative, organized, and enthusiastic Assistant Archivist to join our collections team. The Museum is home to an active Research Center that provides care and access to correspondence, periodicals, books, news clippings, and business records pertaining to the life and art of Charles M. Schulz.

Duties and Responsibilities

The Assistant Archivist reports directly to the Archivist, who is responsible for the overall administration of the Research Center of the Charles M. Schulz Museum. This position is focused on processing archival records related to the life and legacy of Charles M. Schulz, creator of Peanuts, as well as institutional archives. The Archivist Assistant works to implement archival management of records in electronic formats, assists with the public service functions of the Research Center, and engages in active outreach. This position also has responsibility for encoding finding aids using Encoded Archival Description (EAD). In addition, the Assistant Archivist will work with processing assistants, including paraprofessional archival processors and interns. The successful candidate may also participate in digitization projects, acquisition of manuscript and archival collections, and donor relations.

Qualifications

Required

A graduate degree in library science from an ALA-accredited institution, a graduate degree in archival studies, or an equivalent combination of education and experience.
Formal coursework or training in archival management and theory.
Ability to work effectively as part of a team in a dynamically changing environment.
Experience processing archival collections and preparing finding aids.
Familiarity with concepts related to archival management of electronic records.
Knowledge of basic records management principles and current trends.
Ability to learn new technologies quickly and effectively.
Fluency with digitization concepts and best practices.
Strong written, verbal, and interpersonal communication skills.
Preferred

Proficiency with PastPerfect Museum Software and ArchivesSpace.
Reference service experience in a research or academic library.
Expertise working with archival collections in non-textual formats, such as photographs, audio recordings, and video recordings.
Experience working with electronic records.
A comprehensive understanding of Adobe Creative Suites.
Experience with oral history interviews.
About the Museum

The mission of the Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center is to preserve, display, and interpret the art of Charles M. Schulz. The Museum carries out this mission through exhibitions and programming that:

Illustrate the scope of Charles M. Schulz’s multi-faceted career,
Communicate the stories, inspirations, and influences of Charles M. Schulz,
Celebrate the life of Charles M. Schulz and the Peanuts characters, and
Build an understanding of cartoonists and cartoon art.
Benefits and Compensation

This is an hourly non-exempt full time position requiring 40 hours per week, and includes medical and retirement plan benefits. Hourly rate is $19.23.

Apply

Interested candidates should send a cover letter, resume, and samples/links of finding aids to:

Cesar Gallegos, Archivist
Charles M. Schulz Museum
2301 Hardies Lane
Santa Rosa, California 95403
cesar@schulzmuseum.org