Job opportunity: First Year Experience Librarian @ The University of New Mexico

The University of New Mexico College of University Libraries and Learning Sciences (CUL&LS) seeks a service-oriented, innovative First Year Experience Librarian to support a dynamic library system with a strong outreach and instruction program. This is a full-time, 12-month tenure track faculty position with the rank of Assistant Professor. The desired start date is Spring 2019. The annual salary is negotiable based on qualifications and includes full benefits.

Position Description

The First Year Experience Librarian will:

  • Coordinate the first year experience program for the University Libraries and provide information literacy instruction to undergraduates in a variety of disciplines.
  • Have a passion for teaching and be excited about providing instruction to lower-division undergraduates.
  • Serve as the liaison to the First Year Learning Communities, First Year Research Experience, High Schools, Orientation and Transition programs, Residence Life, and the University College.
  • Teach credit courses for the CUL&LS’s Organization, Information & Learning Sciences (OILS) department.
  • Be an engaged, innovative, and service-oriented individual ready to join a dynamic, collaborative team of information professionals.
  • Establish and maintain strong relationships with colleagues and researchers, and employ communication, organizational, analytic, and problem-solving skills.

They will work to meet scholarship and service requirements for promotion and tenure and will participate in faculty governance as detailed in the UNM Faculty Handbook. Working some evenings and weekends is required.

The CUL&LS integrates the UNM values of Academic Freedom, Diversity Within the Academic Community, Creativity and Initiative, Excellence, Integrity and Professionalism, and Access and Student Success into all we do. As identified in the CUL&LS strategic plan, we strive to be “a leader in imagining, creating, and realizing the 21st century academic research library and university.”

Primary Duties

  • Coordinate and assess the impact of the first year experience program for the University Libraries.
  • Design shared instructional materials in various formats (including online tutorials, in-class activities, user guides, and training materials) — working closely with other librarians in doing so.
  • Teach OILS 101: Introduction to Information Studies (3 credits).
  • Build relationships with students and faculty to support their research and instructional endeavors.
  • Market library services to assigned liaison areas and to the university community.
  • Participate in UL&LS faculty governance and in library management as required.
  • Meet scholarship and service requirements for promotion and tenure as detailed in the UNM Faculty Handbook.
  • Contribute to CUL&LS initiatives that further UNM’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Qualifications

Education and Experience

Minimum Requirements:

  • An earned master’s degree from an ALA-accredited library/information sciences program or equivalent by the start date.
  • Two years of teaching experience.

Preferred (Desired) Qualifications:

  • Demonstrated knowledge of and experience with information literacy concepts and trends (e.g., the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy and curriculum mapping).
  • Experience or demonstrated interest in conducting outreach and engagement efforts with students, faculty, and campus partners to support their research and instructional endeavors.
  • Experience with face-to-face and online instruction, including the design of instructional materials, activities, and curricula as well as presentation techniques and skills.
  • Experience teaching credit-bearing courses.
  • Demonstrated skill in using principles of effective design to communicate information or solve problems.
  • Knowledge of Spanish or an Indigenous language of the Southwestern U.S.
  • Excellent oral, written, and interpersonal communication skills as well as strong service orientation.
  • Demonstrated commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion, and student success as well as working with broadly diverse communities.

Application Instructions

Instructions: Please prepare the following documents: CV, Cover Letter addressing each Minimum and Preferred Qualification, Statement of Teaching, and a list of three professional references including email and phone contact information. Questions may be directed to Leah Boetger, search coordinator, at lboetger@unm.edu. Note: We will require official transcripts at the time of hire.

Applicants who are appointed to a UNM faculty position are required to provide an official certification of successful completion of all degree requirements prior to their initial employment with UNM.

For Best Consideration

For best consideration, please apply by 11/2/2018. This position will remain open until filled.

The University of New Mexico provides a comprehensive package of benefits including medical, dental, vision, and life insurance. In addition, UNM offers educational benefits through the tuition remission and dependent education programs. See the Benefits home page for more information.

Please welcome our new Feature Post Writer: Courtney Hunt!

Hello! I’m so happy to volunteer for ArLiSNAP and write for the blog as a Feature Post Writer. I graduated in 2017 from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville with my M.S.I.S. and also hold an M.A. in the History of Art and Architecture from Hunter College/CUNY.

I currently work as Collection Development & Assessment Librarian at the College of Charleston Libraries in Charleston, SC. I’m from Charleston, and I just moved back for this position (and to be closer to family), so I’m taking my time to get to know the campus and reacquaint myself with all that Charleston has to offer. Prior to this position, I worked as an instruction librarian at a community college in Virginia, where I also taught art history as an adjunct instructor.

My research interests are wide, but center around intersectional feminism and art making, specifically looking at women artists from the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Europe. My library research interests include the intersection of critical librarianship and collection development, visual resources, and the ways in which fine arts collections are used.

In my spare time I love to travel and experience art/music/food in new places with my partner and our 14 month old son.
I am very excited to be here and to contribute to ArLiSNAP, which is full of inspiration and information for all of us new professionals in the field! Thanks for having me.

Call for Reviewers: October Issue of ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews

ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews Needs You!

ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews Co-editors are seeking volunteers to author reviews for the October 2018 issue. To volunteer, choose a resource from the list below and complete our Reviewer Interest form (https://goo.gl/forms/mpOOJZaCBb6wIXpA2) by Tuesday, July 31.

Initial draft submissions are due Monday, September 3.

Contributing to ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews is a great opportunity to get involved with the Society, learn about interesting new resources, and help shape the publication. Please feel free to read the complete review guidelines and direct comments and questions about the reviews to arlisna.mtr@gmail.com.

 

Submitted by ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews Co-editors:

Melanie Emerson

Gabriella Karl-Johnson

Alexandra Provo

 

Resources for Review: We seek reviewers for the following resources.

**The snippets below are taken from each resource’s web page and are not necessarily the opinions of the M&T Reviews Co-Editors

 

Hugh Edwards

http://media.artic.edu/edwards/

Hugh Edwards was one of the most influential, yet least known, photography curators in America. During his time at the Art Institute, he worked with remarkable enthusiasm and prescience to build the museum’s photography collection and expand its exhibition program, acquiring some three thousand works and organizing seventy-five shows. In a field that was still young, Edwards helped to shape institutional practices and the public’s understanding of photography in Chicago as well as across the country.

 

Picturing Places

https://www.bl.uk/picturing-places

A new free online resource which explores the Library’s extensive holdings of landscape imagery. The British Library’s huge collection of historic prints and drawings is a treasure trove waiting to be discovered. Picturing Places showcases works of art by well-known artists such as Thomas Gainsborough and J.M.W. Turner alongside images by a multitude of lesser-known figures. Only a few have ever been seen or published before.

 

Connect Vermeer

http://connectvermeer.org/

For many art lovers and museum visitors, Johannes Vermeer stands out as the mysterious genius of Dutch seventeenth-century genre painting. However, as this website reveals, he was not working in isolation. …Through a series of interactive visualisations, this website allows users to discover the network of connections between Vermeer and his sixteen contemporaries. Users can discover the strength and likelihood of relationships between the seventeen artists, the impact of an individual artist’s paintings on the work of his contemporaries, as well as how artists adopted, adapted and disguised elements, from their peers’ work, in their own paintings.

 

Parker Library on the Web

https://parker.stanford.edu/parker

The Parker Library’s holdings of Old English texts account for a substantial proportion of all extant manuscripts in Anglo-Saxon, including the earliest copy of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (c. 890), unique copies of Old English poems and other texts, and King Alfred’s translation of Gregory the Great’s Pastoral Care. The Parker Library also contains key Anglo-Norman and Middle English texts ranging from the Ancrene Wisse and the Brut Chronicle to one of the finest copies of Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde. Other subjects represented in the collection are theology, music, medieval travelogues and maps, apocalypses, bestiaries, royal ceremonies, historical chronicles and Bibles. The Parker Library holds a magnificent collection of English illuminated manuscripts, such as the Bury and Dover Bibles (c. 1135 and c. 1150) and the Chronica maiora by Matthew Paris (c. 1230-50). Scholars in a variety of disciplines – including historians of art, music, science, literature, politics and religion – find invaluable resources in the Library’s collection.

 

Clyfford Still: The Works on Paper

http://pubs.clyffordstillmuseum.org/worksonpaper/

Clyfford Still (1904–1980) may have explored the potential of drawing more than any other artist of his time. The sheer volume (more than 2,300) and variety of Still’s works on paper reveal the centrality of drawing within his lifelong creative process. Over six decades, Still explored (and showed considerable mastery of) the entire range of drawing media—graphite, charcoal, pastel, crayon, pen and ink, oil paint, gouache, and tempera on paper—as well as the printmaking techniques of lithography, etching, woodcut, and silkscreen. Examined together, these works on paper tell the story of an artist who never lost an experimental and curious approach to his art, even as his mature work became quintessentially deliberate and monumental.

 

Vincent van Gogh: The Letters

http://vangoghletters.org/vg/letters.html

All the surviving letters written and received by Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) are contained in this edition of his correspondence. Excepting only the digital form in which they are now being published, this is the continuation of a long tradition.

 

Faces of Frida

https://artsandculture.google.com/project/frida-kahlo

Faces of Frida is a collaboration between the tech giant and a worldwide network of experts and 33 partner museums in seven countries. Accessible via the Google Arts & Culture app and website, Faces of Frida is the largest collection of artworks and objects related to Kahlo ever compiled.

 

Palmyra

http://www.getty.edu/palmyra

In this 21st century, war in Syria has irrevocably changed the ancient caravan city of Palmyra, famed as a meeting place of civilizations since its apogee in the mid-2nd to 3rd century CE. The Romans and Parthians knew Palmyra as a wealthy oasis metropolis, a center of culture and trade on the edge of their empires. Stretching some three kilometers across the Tadmurean desert, the ruins of Palmyra, like all ruins, stand as bearers of meaning marking their place in history. For centuries, traveling artists and explorers have documented the site in former states of preservation. Created as a tribute to Palmyra, this online exhibition captures the site as it was photographed for the first time by Louis Vignes in 1864 and illustrated in the 18th century by the architect Louis-François Cassas. Their works contribute to Palmyra’s legacy, one that goes far beyond the stones of its once great buildings.

ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews Needs You!

*Early-career and new professionals are encouraged to apply*

ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews Co-editors are seeking volunteers to author reviews for the August 2018 issue. To volunteer, choose a resource from the list below and complete our Reviewer Interest form (https://goo.gl/forms/4K4RgU5Gv9dLHIKo1) by Monday, June 4.

 Initial draft submissions are due Monday, July 2, 2018

 Contributing to ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews is a great opportunity to get involved with the Society, learn about interesting new resources, and help shape the publication. Please feel free to read the complete review guidelines and direct comments and questions about the reviews to arlisna.mtr@gmail.com.

 Submitted by ARLIS/NA Multimedia & Technology Reviews Co-editors:

Melanie Emerson

Gabriella Karl-Johnson

Alexandra Provo

Resources for Review: We seek reviewers for the following resources.

  1. Bibliotheca Palatina – Digital: http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/en/bpd/index.html
  2. The Cultural Histories Series:https://www.bloomsburyculturalhistory.com/
  3. Edcat:https://edcat.net/
  4. New Directory of Art Historians:http://www.arthistorians.info/

Resources for Review: We seek reviewers for the following resources.

**The snippets below are taken from each resource’s web page and are not necessarily the opinions of the M&T Reviews Co-Editors

Bibliotheca Palatina – Digital

http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/en/bpd/index.html

A Virtual Reconstruction of the Former Crown Jewel of Germany’s Libraries

One of the consequences of the Thirty Years’ War was that the most important collection of books in the 17th century Holy Roman Empire, the Bibliotheca Palatina, was divided between two principal locations: Heidelberg and the Vatican. Since 2001, Heidelberg University Library has been working on several projects that aim to digitize parts of this great collection, the final goal being a complete virtual reconstruction of the ‘mother of all libraries’

The Cultural Histories Series

https://www.bloomsburyculturalhistory.com/

The Cultural Histories Series offers an authoritative survey of a wide range of subjects throughout history. Each subject is looked at in Antiquity, the Medieval Age, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the Age of Empire and the Modern Age and thematic coverage is consistent across all periods so that users can either gain a broad overview of a period or follow a theme through the ages.

** Reviewer will have access to the trial subscription.

Edcat

https://edcat.net/

edcat is an open catalogue for art editions and publications. Search a fast growing database of artists publications. On edcat you can manage your edition collection and your watchlist, sell and buy them on the marketplace. Contribute and help building the best resource for artists’ editions.

New Directory of Art Historians

http://www.arthistorians.info/

A thirty-year-old resource emerged today as a modern reference tool for art history. The Dictionary of Art Historians, http://www.arthistorians.info/, announced a new interface, data structure, and user options, the product of a year-long redesign. The original tool, a website since 1996, was developed privately by Lee Sorensen, the art and visual studies librarian at Duke University. Duke’s Wired! Lab for digital art history & visual culture sponsored the project beginning in 2016. The new DAH offers searchable data on over 2400 art historians, museum directors, and art-writers of western art from all time periods.

Archives Research & Processing Fellowship

Archives Research & Processing Fellowship, 2.5 days/week

The New Museum Archives seeks an Archives Research & Processing Fellow to support the processing of records in the New Museum’s collections. The New Museum Archives document the New Museum’s history of presenting groundbreaking exhibitions, performances, public programs and civic initiatives, spanning from its founding in 1977 to the present day. Reporting to the New Museum Archivist, the fellow will assist with all aspects of collections processing, with tasks including:

  • Conducting research to identify records and relationships between record groups.
  • Assisting with the creation of finding aids and container lists.
  • Identifying items in need of preservation intervention.
  • Cataloging and re-housing photographic materials.
  • Identifying subjects and events in archival photographs.
  • Recommending items for digitization.
  • Assisting with digitization workflows, as needed.

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Graduate coursework in Art History or Library/Archival Science. Must be currently enrolled student, or starting in Fall 2018.
  • Experience performing archival research and familiarity with handling of archival photos and documents.
  • Background in art history, particularly contemporary art and performance.
  • Experience arranging, describing, and rehousing archival collections, highly desirable.
  • Familiarity with preventative conservation and its application within archival collections.
  • Ability to work in a fast-paced production environment and make workflow changes on the fly.
  • Experience cataloging in a content management system or OPAC, especially Collective Access.
  • Familiarity with digitization specifications and media formats.
  • Editorial and academic writing/publishing experience, a plus. Experience with Adobe Creative Suite, also a plus.

Instructions:

Application reviews will begin immediately, and the position will remain open until filled. This is a temporary 8-12 month position. Interested candidates should send a cover letter, list of three references, and current resume with links to portfolios and writings to archive@newmuseum.org with subject line “Archives Research Fellowship”. Professional and academic letters of recommendation are welcome, and may be sent separately. Applicants who are selected for the position are expected to keep regular weekly hours, to be negotiated in advance with the Archivist, and will be paid with a monthly stipend. Course credit may be arranged.

Welcome Our New ArLiSNAP Co-Moderator, Michele Jennings!

Please join me in welcoming our new Co-Moderator for 2018-2020, Michele Jennings!

Hi ArLiSNAP! My name is Michele Jennings and I’m excited to serve along Breanne Crumpton as your new ArLiSNAP Co-Moderator. I’m the Art Librarian at Ohio University (as of this January) where I act as a subject liaison for Art + Design, Art History, Interior Architecture, Interdisciplinary Arts, and Visual Communication. I completed my MLIS at the University of British Columbia in September 2017 and I have a BA in the History of Art and Visual Culture from UC Santa Cruz. 

I have been a follower and member of ArLiSNAP since 2015, and I’m thrilled to serve as your co-moderator now that I’m able to volunteer time to the organization! As someone who didn’t attend a library school with a dual-masters option or a specialization in art librarianship, ArLiSNAP has been a lifeline to me and an opportunity to be engaged (albeit virtually) with the broader community of students and new professionals in the field. I’m looking forward to offering more chances for new members to connect with each other, and to maintaining ArLiSNAP’s robust social media presence and invaluable job postings and career tips–another lifeline to many of us who follow ArLiSNAP!

Additionally, in the next two years I’d like to strengthen our engagement with critical librarianship and, as job seekers and students, to critically examine the ways that social justice and diversity and inclusion impact our studies, our work, and the field as a whole. This past year the ArLiSNAP/VREPS virtual conference was wonderfully thought provoking and has informed the way that I have personally approached my work as a new professional located at the nexus of art and information. There’s so much more work to be done in our communities, institutions, and organizations, and as new professionals and students it behooves us to bring this critical awareness and engagement into the future of the profession.

And of course, let’s have some fun while we’re at it! I’m so excited to get to work and to connect with all of you, and I hope you’ll share with me your thoughts, opinions, and experiences to make this an even better space for our community.

Thanks,
Michele

Why Attending Conference is Important!

Two of our ArLiSNAP Volunteers discuss their experiences of going to conference as new professionals.

Angelique Roy is the Community Outreach & Volunteer Services Program Librarian at Cochrane Public Library. She is serving as the ArLiSNAP Canadian Liaison and is also the Secretary/Treasurer for ARLIS/NA Canada. You can learn more about Angelique from her welcome post on the ArLiSNAP Blog.

Anna van Someren is the Access Services Librarian at Harvard University, where she started this past August. Anna has written many feature posts for our ArLiSNAP blog. You can read some of Anna’s blog posts as well as her welcome post on our blog.

For more information about our campaign, or to donate, please check out our GoFundMe page.

 

Angelique Roy, ArLiSNAP Canadian Liaison

What is your favorite part about attending an ARLIS/NA conference?

I have been fortunate enough to attend two ARLIS/NA conferences now, one during my final year as a student and one during my first year as a “professional.” I would have to say that my favourite part of the conference has been meeting likeminded people and sharing that excitement and energy with hundreds of others already working (or trying to work, like myself) in the field of art librarianship. It is such an excellent opportunity for networking to meet people from across Canada and the US and to see what kinds of projects and initiatives are currently underway in the field. And if we’re being honest, also the awesome receptions, usually held at beautiful museums or galleries or libraries. Those are a lot of fun J

 

How has attending ARLIS/NA impacted your professional career?

I would like to think it has. I feel so much more connected to the profession than I would if I wasn’t able to attend the conference. This year, after having attended the conference in New Orleans, I came home and felt truly inspired to get involved and follow my passion for the arts. With that said, I have become more actively involved with ArLiSNAP and ARLIS/NA Canada and have been generally seeking out opportunities within the field whether it’s part of my career path or just volunteer roles within the city of Calgary where I’m living.

 

Why do you feel it is important for new professionals to attend conferences?

I think it is important for new professionals to attend the conference because we spend most of our time as students being scared and worrying about the future and our careers. Sometimes we second guess if we’re going down the right path, if we’ll ever get a job in the field, if we’ll ever be as good as other librarians/archivists we know, but I think the conference puts some of those fears and doubts at bay. I feel much more confident now after having attended two conferences, and speaking at one, that I did make the right choice, and I am determined to find work in this field in (Western) Canada (because that can sometimes be the trickiest part).  Once you attend you meet new people who can guide, inspire, support, and advise you and this makes being a new professional a whole lot easier and less intimidating.

 

What are some of the challenges you face in getting to conference?

Of course the number one challenge for most of us, I think, is the cost. It is really challenging to attend a conference in another country when you aren’t currently working or maybe your position doesn’t support this type of conference, or any number of other factors that might come into play depending on your circumstances. In addition to that, I think that time/timing is a challenge. If you start a new job, you may not be entitled to vacation right away or your job might not yet be in the field of art librarianship so getting that time off can be difficult. However, where there’s a will there’s a way! Though I would still say that funding (or lack thereof) would be the biggest challenge I face in getting to an ARLIS/NA conference.

 

Do you feel a travel award targeted at new professionals is needed and why?

YES! I think a travel award targeted at new professionals is so important. Namely for all of the reasons I listed above, but because early career librarians should have the opportunity to attend conferences, meet and get to know their peers, get inspired, explore a new city, and learn about what practices/initiatives/ideas/projects are happening in the profession without a financial impediment!

 

Anna van Someren, ArLiSNAP Feature Post Writer

What are some of the challenges you face in getting to conferences?

I graduated recently and I’m applying for jobs and I really want to go to the conference in New York but I don’t know exactly where I’ll be at that point. I’m applying for academic positions and positions at art institutions and there is no guarantee that my employer at that time will have an interest in supporting me to attend conferences so it might be difficult financially because in school you can apply for a stipend but when you’re a new professional, depending on where you’re employed, you might kind of be on your own.

 

What was your favorite part of attending an ARLIS/NA Conference?

My favorite part about attending my first ARLIS/NA Conference was just how welcoming and open everyone was. I knew some people because I had already attended a few meetings of my local chapter and they were all there at ARLIS/NA and they were so generous with their time and so helpful. They introduced me to so many people and it wasn’t just the people that I knew from my local chapter but everyone that I met at the conference was just so welcoming and so genuinely interested in meeting new people and that was really important to me because it can be kind of overwhelming and a little bit intimidating when you’re trying to enter into a new field.

 

Why do you think it’s important for New Professionals to attend conferences?

I think it’s important for new professionals to attend conferences like ARLIS/NA because you meet people who have been working in the field for decades. You get to hear them speak. You learn so much and it’s really inspiring. It makes you really excited about the possibilities of your own career and you also meet people like you who are just graduating or just in their first or second job, kind of early in their career and you can kind of find a community of people there too.

Call for Proposals: ArLiSNAP/VREPS 2017 Virtual Conference

ArLiSNAP/VREPS 2017 Virtual Conference

Call for Proposals

ArLiSNAP (Art Library Students and New ARLIS Professionals) and VREPS (Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students) are joining forces to host a virtual conference this Fall! The conference, Critical Librarianship in the Arts, will take place at 1pm CST October 14, 2017. The conference will consist of a keynote speaker followed by 1.5 to 2 hours of presentations by students and new professionals. This is an excellent opportunity for those who cannot be physically present at our annual conferences to share projects and ideas.

Our keynote speaker will be Jennifer Ferretti. Jennifer is the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the Maryland Institute College of Art. She is well-known for her “Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ and Information Resources” Libguide, which offers different types of resources to interpret and view Beyonce’s visual album “Lemonade” through multiple lens. We have invited her to talk about Critical Librarianship in the Arts and what it means to her.

We are looking for students and new professionals with an interest in art librarianship or visual resources management to present their work. The theme for this year’s conference is focused on critical librarianship in the arts. As defined on critlib.org, critical librarianship is “a movement of library workers dedicated to bringing social justice principles into our work in libraries.” Do you have an example of critical librarianship through art that you would like to discuss? Or a unique perspective on how the arts could fight social justice? Submit your proposal, and add your voice to our discussion on the future of the field!

 

Requirements:

  1. Presenters must be MLIS students or new professionals with fewer than five years of experience in the field.
  2. Presentations will be between ten and fifteen minutes in length.
  3. Presenters need to be available for a live presentation and brief Q&A session on the afternoon of October 14, 2017. Presenters need to be available for a practice session the week before to test equipment. A date and time for the practice session will be determined at a later date.

Submit your proposal via this link by Thursday, August 31st.

If you have any questions about this event, please don’t hesitate to contact the ArLiSNAP Co-Moderators, Courtney Baron, courtneylbaron@gmail.com, and Breanne Crumpton, becrumpton@gmail.com.

Best,

ArLiSNAP and VREPS

Announcing the ArLiSNAP/VREPS 2017 Virtual Conference

ArLiSNAP (Art Library Students and New ARLIS Professionals) and VREPS (Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students) are joining forces to host a virtual conference this May! The conference, Critical Librarianship in the Arts, will take place at 1pm CST October 14, 2017.

Our Keynote Speaker will be Jennifer Ferretti, the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the Maryland Institute College of Art.

The conference will consist of a keynote speaker followed by 1.5 to 2 hours of presentations by students and new professionals. This is an excellent opportunity for those who cannot be physically present at our annual conferences to share projects and ideas.

The Call for Proposals will be sent out next week.

 

STAY TUNED!!

Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Summer Internships

The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center is providing two paid internships for the summer.

Oral history intern:

Objective:  To create a video oral history of (an) individual(s) who knew Georgia O’Keeffe in Amarillo and Canyon, Texas for the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum and an additional edited 5-minute summary video that will have a depth and range of recollections/memories of this individual and help researchers and visitors to the Museum gain a fuller understanding of Georgia O’Keeffe.  All of the contents from the internship – the full interview, the 5-minute video, photographs, and all supplementary material – will be added to the archives of the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.  One of the key learning experiences is to understand how oral histories are utilized in museums.  This internship will be based in West Texas.

Skills desired:  research, documentary film/journalism, studio art – photography, computer (MS Office), Documentation, general writing, self-motivation and ability to work independently

 

RC Garden Research intern:

Objective:  To research the plants and trees in the Research Center garden in order to provide content for future tours of the RC garden space.  Content includes:  historical information about plants and their use in New Mexico, botanical information about each of the plants, and as well as context of O’Keeffe’s love of gardening and use of plants as subject matter in her paintings.  Final product will be a draft of text for an audio guide.  May be required to drive to Abiquiu home and studio to conduct research about gardens in that space.  One of the key learning experiences is to understand how research is utilized by museums for the visitor experience.

Skills desired:  research, computer (databases/data entry), computer (MS Office), documentation, general writing, science background with knowledge of plants and gardening, interest in the arts, self-motivation and ability to work independently

 

Further information can be found here:  https://www.okeeffemuseum.org/about-the-museum/opportunities/internship-opportunities/.  The internships are listed under the BF Foundation.