ARLIS/NA MOQ Fall Meeting / ARLIS/NA MOQ réunion d’automne

The Montréal-Ottawa-Québec chapter (ARLIS/NA MOQ) is excited to announce our Fall meeting which will be held on Friday, November 24 at the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montréal.

Please see the programme attached.

—–

Le chapitre Montréal-Ottawa-Québec (ARIS/NA MOQ) est heureux d’annoncer notre réunion d’automne qui aura lieu le 24 novembre au Centre Canadien d’Architecture à Montréal.

Le programme de la journée est ci-joint.

ARLIS-NA MOQ_Rencontre d’automne 2017_CCA

ARLIS/NA Ontario Fall Meeting – Nov. 10th

Registration is now open for the ARLIS/NA Ontario 2017 Fall Business Meeting in Hamilton! This season’s meeting will take place tomorrow Friday, November 10, beginning at the Hamilton Public Library. The day will include a tour, lunch and stroll through Hamilton’s many art galleries. Itinerary is as follows:

  • 10:30am-12pm:  Fall Business Meeting at 5th Floor Boardroom of central branch of Hamilton Public Library
  • 12-1:30pm: Group lunch at the George Hamilton Restaurant and Bar (not included in registration cost)
  • 1:30-3pm:  Tour of HPL Art Collection and Archives, and talk with Community Librarian about Arts Programming
  • 3-5-ishpm:  Tour of James Street North small businesses, art galleries, and artist run centres
  • 6-11pm: For anyone wanting to take in a bit more of what Hamilton has to offer, the meeting will coincide with the James Street Art Crawl!

*A carpool van from a central location in Toronto may be available if there is sufficient interest.

Visit the ARLIS/NA Ontario website for more information and to register!

Canadian Librarians Spotlight: An Interview with Daniel Payne

What is the name of the employer/institution you work for?

The Dorothy H. Hoover Library, OCAD University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Can you tell us a little bit about your background, your current position, and how you got into the field of (art) librarianship?

I have a Bachelor of Education and a Master’s degree in musicology, but I never really felt fully comfortable in either environment. Teaching in a traditional classroom is rewarding; however, I always feel so confined in my ability to access knowledge-building tools. In a library, I am surrounded by informational learning resources—print, electronic, audio-visual, or through the knowledge of my peers—and this level of connectedness cannot be replicated in even the most high-tech, wired, “smart” classroom.

I started working at OCAD University in 2002 and moved from a contract position at a smaller Canadian university that likely was going to become a permanent, tenure track position. When the job at OCAD U was posted—even though the pay was not ideal and the faculty status situation not as secure, I took the risk as it offered an ideal opportunity to explore librarianship in a creative research environment, which for me is a perfect way to combine my artistic and academic interests.

What does a typical day at work look like for you? What is usually the highlight of your day?

One of the best things about working in libraries is that there really are no “typical days.” Although I do spend much time in my workweek covering reference desk services, I’m fairly consistently in the classroom offering information literacy sessions for courses, attending curriculum meetings, working on professional development activities, buying books, helping manage our database collections, developing our web site, preparing for conferences, researching and writing, and so on. I feel that, as a librarian, I’m able to define what my work day will look like and not be confined by the classroom, with its set class times, static textbooks, and limited office hours.

Perhaps—in all honesty—the highlight of my day is working at the reference desk. Although many academic librarians are moving away from this service node in favour of the classroom, I find it one of the most vital tools I have as a librarian for communicating collegially with students, staff, and faculty. I can’t count the number of information literacy sessions, collection development requests, and professional networking contacts I’ve made through the random, informal discussions I’ve had at the reference desk. It is a communications platform that is unique; educators such as Paulo Friere often advocate for reform in pedagogy through the use of active learning models which empower researchers to discover their own sense-making pathways to knowledge. I truly feel that the reference desk is one of the most powerful learning spaces we currently have in our educational system for fully embodying a more egalitarian, democratic approach to learning in what Friere calls the “practices of freedom.” It’s because the person asking the question initiates the research journey and, in a way, is in direct control over the educational experience. I work collegially with them to try to come to some resolution, but a reference inquiry is truly a patron-led mode of teaching and learning.

Do you have any advice for current students and/or those on the job market? What are the most important things emerging art librarians should know?

I find this a very difficult question to answer; mainly because we are currently in a very challenging work environment and it seems that many of the older established models for librarianship as a profession are changing. But I would encourage all new librarians to be patient, proactive, and passionate. Patience is required because those perfect jobs are rarely available immediately and realistically one has to build towards this ultimate goal. Sometimes—and this is difficult for me to say as I feel that I do have the perfect job!—these “dream” jobs simply don’t exist, so one is forced to put together a career piecemeal.

This is where the proactive component is important. Being flexible and adaptable; smiling through adversity; being willing to re-locate to begin building one’s career are all essential skills. Yet these diverse experiences, though frustrating at times, will offer a multi-modal knowledgebase to prepare you for the professional agility required in this new economy. Part of being proactive is also realizing that wherever you are working, you can find some way to use these skillsets to learn something and build your overall life experiences.  I remember hearing a comment by a rising young art gallery owner who worked at the OCAD U Library several years ago re-shelving books. He claimed that everything he knows about art theory was gleaned from putting books back on the shelf. It’s not that he learned about these aesthetic theories in depth—this is unquestionably the domain of the studio or classroom; but the library helped him to understand how these theories relate to other ones by their spatial relation to other books on the shelf. Likely all young aspiring librarians know, based on previous student work experiences, how repetitive re-shelving books can be and, perhaps even more tediously, shelf-reading; but this rising new voice in the art world realized that working in a library was a critical, once in a lifetime opportunity and used it for maximum benefit. So if one envisions this “pastiche” of careers as a collage, it does take on a new sense of unity. It may not be a gesamtkunstwerk (total work of art) expressing one controlled and contained totality, but a collage has a vitality of its own that, in a way, is more dialogic.

Finally, the passion part ensures that—wherever you end up settling career-wise—the founding vision statements of librarianship stay with you. Whether it be the “Statement on Intellectual Freedom” by the Canadian Library Association or S.R. Ranganathan’s Five Laws of Library Science; these documents are revolutionary and, considering how market-driven, commodified, surveilled, and commercialized our lived spaces are becoming, we need to fight for this last bastion of information equity in our world.

What were/are some challenges for you as an art librarian? What do you think are current challenges in the field of art librarianship or librarianship in general, particularly within Canada?

Be warned: I’m going to go on a bit of a tirade ;-) But perhaps my biggest challenge is the feeling that as a librarian, I’m going head-to-head with the massive multi-billion dollar commercial marketing machine of Google! I am only being slightly facetious though; recent statistics provided by OCLC in their Perceptions of Libraries survey indicate that, almost ubiquitously, people are using search engines such as Google as their sole portal for accessing information for all research needs from personal to academic to professional. Primarily my concern is that Google is a private company and the bottom line for all their services is profit. What’s the bottom line for a library that looks to the “Statement on Intellectual Freedom” for its operational mandate? Social justice, human rights, freedom of information, and the right to privacy!

Linked to the for-profit situation, Google searching has enforced a strange impulse in researchers to approach all topics in an almost myopically literal manner. Given the volume of information accessible on the open internet, generally whatever search topic is entered in Google always guarantees results that are precisely related to the initial search topic. Furthermore, almost ubiquitously, that first web link retrieved is a Wikipedia entry (I mean, really, is Wikipedia always the top source for all searches? Doesn’t this make anyone suspicious?). But for me, the essence of research, especially in the work of creativity, is finding something that you don’t expect and having to struggle to figure out why this new, unanticipated information has been retrieved. This scenario is further exacerbated by Google’s search features that start profiling us individually based on our previous search histories and starts feeding us sites that it thinks that we’d be interest in. This, of course, is the quintessential “filter bubble” scenario. So now in my work as a reference librarian, I find that year-by-year, my new mantra is to plead with researchers to stop thinking so literally and start finding pathways for thinking laterally. Our library search tools and collections are entirely built on this latter premise.

Finally, my third and inter-related concern is that the search engine has completely weaned people off of any other search strategies. Google is always Plan A and in the rare circumstances where it fails, people have no Plan B alternatives. Using library catalogues, abstracts and indexes, a library’s discovery layer, even knowing how to browse for books in a library, have all become so foreign to everyday researchers, that these bibliographic literacy practices have left people’s consciousness as viable alternatives for accessing information. Out of sight; out of mind.

Can you talk a little bit about ways that you draw on the more conventional aspects of your LIS education? And what are some things you’ve had to learn on your own?

As a reference librarian, I’ve found that there are two broad topics that have been essential for my work; one is related to theory (and I wish that this had been taught more consistently in my library sciences’ education) and the other, practice (which I sorely wished that I didn’t have to learn in school, but am now so grateful that I did!).

My first educational principle is a deep, reflective knowledge of the writings of former library science theorists. Much of my current work as a librarian is entirely shaped by Brenda Dervin’s concept of sense-making, Carole C. Kuhlthau’s ISP, and S.R. Ranganathan’s “Five Laws of Library Sciences.” I might have stumbled across these visionaries while researching for LIS essays, but I feel that a required course in library history is essential for all ALA accredited programs. Knowing how library workers throughout history have dealt with new technologies, changing research needs, and new modes of accessing knowledge is critical; now more than ever when the pace of change seems to be moving at lightning speed.

Secondly in regards to practice, while in library school I took a course titled “Thesaurus Construction” in which I received the worst mark on my LIS record and close to the lowest in my entire academic career. The curricular material was gruellingly dull; in one class I fell asleep while tipped back in my chair which was balanced on the back two legs. The clatter and ensuing thud was, I’m sure, deafening.  But since then, I have grown to appreciate how these ways of envisioning information in hierarchies, working from broad to narrow terms, has helped me inordinately in assisting others to make sense of how libraries are organized. I use these principles in all my information literacy sessions, when working on web pages, creating search guides, answering reference questions, even when writing emails. When one thinks about the basic organizational unit for libraries—the call number—this unique coding language embodies the hierarchy of subjects that libraries employ: from main classes to subclasses down to Cutter numbers. These unique identifiers—the URL address for the print book on the shelf—encode how libraries envision knowledge structures and convey our sense-making way of processing ideas in the world. The fact that these indexical symbols then become wayfinding devices makes for a perfect metaphor for the entire library endeavour.

What would you consider the most rewarding parts of your job, and what are your biggest challenges as an information professional in an academic library?

I might use much of my earlier Google tirade to answer this question! But perhaps to emphasize this issue anecdotally: most often when I tell people I work as a librarian, after a brief quizzical pause then the inevitable “you must get to read a lot of books!” comment, people always tend to chime in: “I love libraries; I love the smell of books.” Much as I’m loathe to discourage any positive commendation for libraries in an age when the institution seems in such a precarious state, I have found the phrase too glib, almost dismissive. I think it’s because this colloquialism is so steeped in a romanticized sense of nostalgia that it seems to relegate libraries to the status of a charming old dusty antiquarian shoppe. I feel like I should carry a copy of the CLA Statement on Intellectual Freedom wherever I go and make people read it immediately after saying they love libraries. Libraries—and this is where I get to the part about the “most rewarding” part of my job—are radical institutions that are one of the last bastions for advocating for public empowerment with no strings attached.  In a recent interview, I was asked “What do librarians do all day anyway?” I answered that we create communities through fostering communication. The reason that librarians build collections, evaluate research methodologies, manage data, or teach our users how to become information literate is so that people can become active members of a knowledge community. Not only do we teach people how to ask questions, but—perhaps most importantly—we suggest pathways for answering them.  Again, with no strings attached. We’re not trying to sell products, ideas, or lifestyles. We’re here solely so that people can empower themselves with knowledge. So instead of people saying “I love libraries,” I wish they would be a little more specific and say something like, “I love how libraries are so subversively radical”!

Do you have any insight or advice as to how ArLiSNAP can assist in connecting emerging Canadian and American information professionals?

Keep up your membership with ARLIS/NA! The Society has been so remarkable in maintaining an open line of communication between countries. At the local level, the avenues that ARLIS/NA offers for students in administrative positions and providing special funding grants are commendable, so participating in regional chapters can open a host of professional opportunities and the capability of attending annual conferences which truly are international ventures.

Tell us something fun about yourself! What do you do in your spare time? If you could take a trip right now to visit any library in the world, which would it be?

I have an insatiable appetite for live music and seem to spend almost every weekend visiting Toronto’s Rex Hotel for a weekly dose of jazz. Also, I’ve been a cellist since high school and spent part of my early career as a professional musician.

Playing music has been an essential part of my life; even though I’m not as active now that I work as a full time reference librarian, I have a much more manageable musical schedule. Aside from ongoing annual performances of Handel’s Messiah with Arcady Choir and Orchestra (http://arcady.ca/), I am focused mainly on my role as the principal cellist for the Counterpoint Community Orchestra (http://www.ccorchestra.org/). I find this collegial music-making environment utterly fulfilling. In the past, I had to rely on making money through performing, but now I can relax and enjoy playing the classics of Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky and more purely for the sake of making music.

And my response for visiting a library? In all honesty, I would re-do the entire ARLIS/NA 2016 Study Tour to Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Utrecht, and Den Hague, in the Netherlands (https://www.arlisna.org/studytour2016-Netherlands/). I splurged and took part in this trip and found that every aspect of the trip was magical!

Acquisitions Librarian/Bibliothécaire, Acquisitions – Canadian Centre for Architecture/Centre Canadien d’Architecture, Montreal, Quebec

Job identification
Job Title: Acquisitions Librarian
Division: Collection
Immediate superior: Associate Director, Collection
Status: Permanent, full time (35hrs/week)
Posting period: September 29 to October 20, 2017
Job entry: November 2017

Job Summary
The key responsibilities of this job are to develop a coherent long term strategy for library acquisitions that relates to the curatorial direction and other Collection acquisitions. The incumbent plans, coordinates and manages all aspects of the acquisition of library collection materials. In doing so, the incumbent collaborates actively with the curatorial, editorial, collection and research divisions, as well as with the bookstore and Collection team.

Key responsibilities
Library acquisitions

  • In collaboration with the curatorial, editorial, collection and research divisions, coordinates, plans, develops and manages all aspects of the acquisition of the library collection, and proposes lines of investigation and acquisition
  • Manages and coordinates in collaboration with the Associate Director, Collection, the international exchange program of publications, in relation to curatorial projects and Collection acquisitions
  • Collaborates closely with the bookstore staff on ordering and on curatorial selections to be presented
  • Actively scouts for new publishers, distributors and vendors
  • Manages and monitors the library acquisition operations and budgets
  • Supervises the Acquisition, Assistant and works closely with the Head, Collection Access to improve access to the Collection
  • Prepares customs documentation and negotiate with brokers and delivery firms
  • Manages the standing order plan, selecting series titles for standing order, setting up standing orders and traces multi-volume sets and series to complete library holdings
  • Deals with donors who wish to donate material, providing or arranging evaluations as required

Collection development strategy

  • Works closely with curatorial, editorial and research staff in discussing their projects and develops a coherent collection development strategy that responds to CCA’s diverse and changing research needs
  • Collaborates with CCA Bookstore staff to maintain currency in recent publications and to exchange information on publications
  • Participates in the testing, evaluation, approval and implementation of new software and upgrades to the Library’s integrated online system

Required qualifications

  • Education: Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) degree from an ALA accredited institution and an (under) graduate degree in the history of architecture or art or a related discipline in the humanities
  • Number of years of relevant work experience: 3 to 5 years
  • Excellent knowledge of spoken and written French and English is essential
  • Good understanding of the contemporary debate in architecture
  • Excellent research skills
  • Familiarity with architectural bibliography
  • Facility in handling fragile and precious collection materials
  • Good understanding of electronic publishing and digital developments
  • Good understanding of the out of print book market
  • Good understanding of acquisition databases

Please submit your application before October 20, 2017 to the attention of Human Resources, Canadian Centre for Architecture, 1920 Baile Street, Montreal (Quebec) H3H 2S6, email: rh@cca.qc.ca. Only successful applicants will be contacted. Please do not call.

The CCA is an equal opportunity employer.

Identification de l’emploi

Titre de l’emploi: Bibliothécaire, Acquisitions
Division: Collection
Supérieur immédiat: Directeur Associé, Collection
Statut: Permanent à temps complet (35hrs/semaine)
Période d’affichage: Du 29 septembre au 20 octobre 2017
Entrée en poste: Novembre 2017

Sommaire de l’emploi
Les responsabilités principales de cet emploi consistent à développer une stratégie cohérente et à long terme pour les acquisitions de la bibliothèque relatives à la direction curatoriale et aux différentes acquisitions de la Collection. Le titulaire du poste planifie, coordonne et gère tous les aspects de l’acquisition des objets de collection de la bibliothèque. Par conséquent, il collabore activement avec les divisions curatoriale et éditoriale, les divisions de la collection et de la recherche ainsi que la librairie et l’équipe de la collection.

Principales responsabilités de l’emploi
Acquisitions de la bibliothèque

  • En collaboration avec les divisions curatoriale, éditoriale, de la collection et de la recherche, coordonner, planifier, développer et gérer tous les aspects de l’acquisition de la collection de la bibliothèque. Proposer des pistes de recherche et des perspectives d’acquisition
  • Gérer et coordonner le programme international d’échange des publications en collaboration avec le Directeur associé, Collection, en fonction des projets curatoriaux et des acquisitions de la Collection
  • Collaborer étroitement avec l’équipe de la librairie pour les commandes et pour la présentation des sélections curatoriales
  • Rechercher activement les nouveaux éditeurs, distributeurs et fournisseurs
  • Gérer et effectuer le suivi des opérations et des budgets des acquisitions de la bibliothèque
  • Superviser l’Assistant, Acquisition et travailler en étroite collaboration avec le Chef, Accès à la Collection pour améliorer l’accès à la Collection
  • Préparer les documents pour les douanes et négocier avec les courtiers et les compagnies de livraison
  • Gérer le plan des ordres permanents: sélectionner les titres de périodiques pour les ordres permanents, mettre en place les ordres permanents et effectuer le suivi des documents en plusieurs volumes et des périodiques pour compléter les fonds de la bibliothèque
  • Traiter avec les donateurs qui souhaitent faire un don d’objets, en fournissant et en organisant des évaluations au besoin

Stratégie de développement de la Collection

  • Travailler en étroite collaboration avec les équipes curatoriale, éditoriale et recherche en discutant de leurs projets. Développer une stratégie cohérente pour la collection qui répond aux besoins divers et changeants du CCA
  • Collaborer avec l’équipe de la librairie du CCA pour maintenir les publications récentes à jour et échanger les informations sur les publications
  • Participer aux tests, à l’évaluation, à l’approbation et à l’implantation de nouveaux logiciels ainsi qu’à la mise à jour du système intégré en ligne de la bibliothèque

Qualifications requises pour l’emploi

  • Niveau de scolarité: Maîtrise en Bibliothéconomie et en sciences de l’information (MBSI) obtenue dans une institution reconnue par l’ALA et un diplôme (de premier cycle) en histoire de l’architecture ou histoire de l’art ou autre discipline connexe en sciences humaines
  • Nombre d’années d’expérience pertinente: 3 à 5 ans
  • Excellentes connaissances du français et de l’anglais oral et écrit
  • Bonne compréhension du débat contemporain en architecture
  • Excellentes compétences de recherche
  • Connaissance en bibliographie architecturale
  • Aisance pour manipuler des objets de collection fragiles et précieux
  • Bonne compréhension de l’édition et des développements numériques
  • Bonne compréhension du marché des livres épuisés
  • Bonne compréhension des bases de données d’acquisition

Veuillez soumettre votre candidature, d’ici le 20 octobre 2017 à l’attention du Service des Ressources humaines, Centre Canadien d’Architecture, 1920, rue Baile, Montréal (Québec) H3H 2S6, courriel : rh@cca.qc.ca. Seuls les candidats retenus seront contactés. Veuillez ne pas téléphoner.

Le CCA a une politique d’équité en matière d’emploi.

http://www.cca.qc.ca/en/51699/acquisitions-librarian

Canadian Librarians Spotlight: An Interview with Mark Black

What is the name of the employer/institution you work for?

Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity

Can you tell us a little bit about your background, your current position, and how you got into the field of (art) librarianship?

I’m currently the manager of the Paul D. Fleck Library and Archives at Banff Centre. I have been working libraries in a variety of positions from clerk to marketing to home delivery to programming to youth librarian since 1997. I also have worked in television as a researcher and production coordinator.

My arts background is mostly in music and the literary arts. When it comes to fine arts, I would say my formal skill set is somewhat lacking. I spent a few years working in this library as a clerk back in 2001-2003 so I have called on that experience a lot. Luckily I wasn’t hired to be an artist, I was hired to be a librarian. I do need to modify my approach depending on needs, but ultimately the goal is to put people in touch with what they need in order to create and learn.

It’s been a very circuitous route. I was lucky to have worked for a number of librarians who encouraged me to pursue librarianship. My grades were not good, but everything I did from 1997 until I entered grad school had a library or research focus. I made it hard for them to not accept me because I wouldn’t settle for anything but a yes.

What brought you to your current position? 

I was a youth librarian at an under-resourced and heavily used public library.  I loved the staff and kids I worked with, but it could be a very taxing job. I’m probably describing the work of every public librarian ever. I wanted to prove myself in a leadership role and the opportunities to do so weren’t present. I had promised myself that after two years in my position I’d re-evaluate where I was headed career wise. Almost exactly two years to my start date this job was posted and it seemed like fate. I had worked at Banff Centre in the library early in my career and thought it might be the right fit for me again. I was lucky that they thought so too.

What does a typical day at work look like for you?

Check email, meetings with departments, staff, faculty, and artists on how the library can support their work – whether through our current collections, increased access to resources, or hosting programming, reference questions, taking care of paperwork (HR, budget, scheduling, health and safety, purchasing), trying to plan for and prognosticate the needs of our users – I want to make sure that we not only react to their needs, but anticipate them, drink too many cokes, and a steady iTunes soundtrack.  Also in there is reading to stay on top of trends and news that impacts our library and our community of users and trying to squeeze in professional development.

What were/are some challenges for you as an art(s) librarian? What do you think are current challenges in the field of art librarianship/librarianship in general, particularly within Canada?

One of my greatest struggles is developing a collection that is inclusive. We work in an industry that is primarily white with materials that are predominantly produced by white people. Our collections and our practices have a lot of blind spots. We have to be better. It’s a big conversation that has to happen at so many levels – collections, library schools, hiring practices, programming, etc. and I’m not sure we as librarians are actively having it

Do you have any advice for current students and/or those on the job market? What are the most important things emerging art librarians should know?

Be honest in interviews. Know your value, know why someone would want to hire you, and communicate that in an interview.  Formulate a game plan of how you are going to sell yourself and your abilities in an interview and make sure to hit those notes.

You’re trying to create a relationship in an interview as quickly as possible.  It will help you make a decision on whether this job is a good fit if you do your best to be you throughout it.

Can you talk a little bit about ways that you draw on the more conventional aspects of your LIS education? What are some things you’ve had to learn on your own?

I’m not entirely convinced that my LIS education sufficiently prepared me for what I would encounter in the field so to speak. I had a lot of well educated, distinguished, and intelligent professors, but what I was taught in the classroom and what I encounter in practice are often quite different. There can often be a gap between library academics and library practitioners. It’s not a right or wrong situation, it’s just that my experience in libraries didn’t always match up with what I learned in the classroom.

The three biggest areas where I had to learn on my own were: public outreach and community building, leadership/coaching/managing a staff, and finances (budgeting, grant applications, business proposals).

Luckily there are lots of colleagues who have been in the same position and you can draw on a diversity of opinions and experiences – that has helped a lot.

What would you consider the most rewarding parts of your job, and what are your biggest challenges as an information professional in a special library environment?

Most rewarding: Putting someone in touch with something they didn’t know existed or didn’t know was accessible– as librarians we can often make the impossible seem possible and that is a great feeling.

Biggest challenge: No library is free from this – there are still a lot of people who do not understand the possibilities of the library and what a library can offer (whether it’s academic, public, special etc.). It’s an ongoing struggle to prove our relevance to people who not only haven’t been through our doors, but don’t even know where our doors are.

Do you have any insight or advice as to how ArLiSNAP can assist in connecting emerging Canadian and American information professionals?

Mentor partnering, informal meet-ups and chats, opportunities to partner with more established information professionals for presentation or writing opportunities – really just anything that gives people a chance to speak honestly, connect, and share knowledge in an environment that drops ranks and allows everyone to be themselves. We all need a place where we can ask earnest questions without feeling dumb or judged.

Tell us something fun about yourself! What do you do in your spare time? If you could take a trip right now to visit any library in the world, which would it be?

Baseball, music (mostly punk rock), reading, and travel are my biggest outlets. I’m trying to  get back into ice skating and skiing now that I am back in the mountains – my mileage will vary.

Easy – the Giamatti Research Center at the National Baseball Hall of Fame Library in Cooperstown, New York. I have dreamed of working there for almost 20 years.  Some day?

ARLIS/NA Montreal-Ottawa-Quebec Call For Submissions

Hi all!

The ARLIS/NA Montreal-Ottawa-Quebec Chapter is currently seeking submissions for their biannual publication : MOQDOC, and welcome contributions from students and emerging professionals. This is a great opportunity to write about a variety of topics including:

  • conference reports
  • exhibition reviews
  • book reviews
  • profile of a member or an organization
  • contributions to the calendar of events
  • sharing of information resources, including awards
  • description of your research, special projects, or work in progress

The deadline for submissions is Friday, October 20, 2017.

Further details can be found on the ARLIS/NA MOQ website: http://arlismoq.ca/call-for-submissions-moqdoc-vol-27-no-1-fall-2017/

Archives Practicum-Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity

Overview

The Archives Practicum program is designed for new archivists with an interest in artistic, multimedia, and/or corporate records. This hands-on experience allows new professionals to work closely with Banff Centre’s Archivist. The Archivist will work with and mentor the participant in an area of interest such as digitization and digital archiving, arrangement and description, or reference and outreach. The participant will also receive a general overview of the activities of an Archives and Records Management Centre, with introductions to all key aspects of archival work.

What does the program offer?

The program offers an introduction to working in an archive, and particularly one with large artistic, multimedia, and digital holdings. Practical experience may involve working on accessioning and describing records of the Banff New Media Institute (BNMI) , or identifying and implementing best practices regarding preservation and digitization of audio-visual materials. These projects will provide practical experience in the main areas of archival work. Learning opportunities may also arise through attendance at lectures, workshops, and events related to arts programming at Banff Centre. Participants will also have the opportunity to work on personal research activities as outlined in their learning objectives and project proposal.

Who should apply?

Practicum placements are appropriate for recent graduates of Master of Archival studies programs or Master in Library and Information Science programs, with an interest in archival work. This is an opportunity for a new professional to gain experience and expand and develop their career and capabilities. This program requires a full-time commitment.

Job Opportunity: Color Librarian, Lululemon–12 month contract

Not quite the conventional art library job, but it might be interesting!

 

REFERENCE #: 022010

LOCATION: Vancouver , British Columbia , Canada

JOB FAMILY GROUP: Quality Assurance

lululemon 
Founded in 1998 in beautiful Vancouver, BC lululemon athletica creates components to live longer, healthier more fun lives.

The color librarian manages the organizational process of the colour department and maintains their physical library in the LAB. This person is driven by process, structure and is independently motivated. The librarian is key in making the work flow for the colorist run more smoothly and efficiently.

a day in the life of the color librarian

  • Suppports colourist with tracking lab dip submission comments for colour and colourfastness in PLM
  • Maintains library for color standard development and color standard inventory
  • Measures lab dips daily for Colorist using Spectrophotometer
  • Measures seasonal color standards for Colorist using Spectrophotometer
  • Files all lab dips daily as well as ensures end of season maintenance
  • Manages all shipment to LLO and receives SSC mail
  • Pulls all lab dips for for design/merchandising meetings or readiness reviews
  • Ensures all colour approvals made in season are added to color continuity cards and filed in our library
  • Processes all invoices through Kofax
  • Assists the Colorist in ordering seasonal Color Palette
  • Assists in pulling heathers for thread matching
  • Organizes fabrics for the creation of the seasonal thread legend
  • Uploads recommended dye recipes to Flex PLM at the color level

the finer print 

  • You will have 1-2 years of administrative work experience
  • You have a love for organization
  • Ability to work well under pressure and achieve deadlines
  • Proactive, problem solving and results oriented
  • Proven work ethic with utmost integrity
  • Desire to excel and succeed
  • Actively live and breathe the lululemon culture and lifestyle
  • Self-awareness, with a desire for constant self improvement (goal –oriented)
  • Entrepreneurial spirit and an egoless nature
  • Self motivated, passionate, empathetic, approachable
  • Outgoing, energetic, upbeat and fun!

Apply online: http://info.eu.lululemon.com/careers/ssc-jobs/color-librarian—12-month-contract-022010

Head, Reference Services | National Gallery of Canada

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Job Summary

Provides knowledge of and access to the Library’s collections and related external resources by planning, implementing, delivering and monitoring all aspects of those public service programs designed to meet the research and reference requirements of National Gallery of Canada staff and external clientele. Participates in the development of the Library collections and research resources, including the main collection, the rare book collection, the artists’ books and multiples collection, and the documentation collection. Supervises circulation, interlibrary loan, stack maintenance and photocopying and scanning services.

MAIN DUTIES:
The Head of Reference Services is responsible for all aspects of public services programming for the main Library collections. Working in consultation with the Chief, Library, Archives and Research Fellowship Program, the Head of Reference Services:

– Provides general and advanced reference services and orientation to National Gallery of Canada curatorial and research staff, visiting research fellows, external researchers and scholars, and the general public;
– Plans, implements, and administers policies and procedures for reference activities including circulation and interlibrary loan services;
– Develops and promotes online services and resources;
– Supervises the Reference staff and supports and encourages their professional development;
– Represents and promotes the collections and services of the Library and Archives through outreach activities including: participation in the Library and Archives exhibition program, the publication program (Occasional Papers series), and in professional organizations at local, national and international venues;
– Develops the reference collection and participates in the development of the Library and Archives’ collections and resources, including the main collection, the rare book collection, the artists’ books and multiples collection, and the documentation collection, in accordance with the Library’s mandate and acquisition policy;
– Ensures the preservation and security of Library collections during their storage and use.


Requirements

• Master of Library and Information Studies (MLIS) degree from an ALA-accredited program.
• Master’s or undergraduate degree in Art History or a related discipline is preferred.
• Five years of professional experience working as a public service or reference librarian in an academic or research library, preferably an art library.
• Familiarity with the major bibliographic tools (print and electronic) and research methods for Art History.
• Excellent verbal and written communication skills, and interpersonal skills to work effectively with a wide range of staff and patrons.
• Excellent presentation and public speaking skills.
• Strong commitment to public service.
• Familiarity with library standards, best-practice, library applications, computer systems, online databases, digital imaging technology, user access and image delivery technology.
• Experience working with websites.
• Supervisory experience is preferred.
• Knowledge of preservation and conservation practices and techniques to ensure that collections are well housed, stored, and handled.
• Flexibility and ability to react quickly and positively to change and the ability to accept challenges and create new opportunities.
• Excellent attention to detail and organizational skills.

Notice to Applicants: The Human Resources Department of the National Gallery of Canada, invite selected applicants for interviews by way of written communication via email as per the NGC Staffing Process. Should applicants opt to unsubscribe from receiving emails regarding employment in this organisation, please note that we will not be able to communicate with you to participate in the interview process.

We encourage applicants to update their career profiles, ensure Email Communication Consent preferences are set to allow emails and check email junk/spam folders regularly.


Condition of Employment

Must meet the bilingual requirement to be invited to the interview process.
Reliability Status – this factor is not used at the pre-selection stage.


Additional Information

• A variety of assessment tools will be used to assess candidates;
• The National Gallery of Canada is committed to having a skilled, diversified workforce reflective of Canadian society. As a result, it promotes employment equity and encourages candidates to indicate voluntarily in their application if they are a woman, an Aboriginal person, a person with a disability or a member of a visible minority group;
• The Gallery is committed to developing inclusive, barrier-free selection processes and work environment. Alternative selection tool methods and/or reasonable accommodation are available upon request;
• Candidates are entitled to participate in the selection process in the official language of their choice.

Apply: http://ow.ly/zYV230c1xmr

Manager, Exhibits and Partnerships at the Vancouver Public Library

Description

About us

The award-winning Vancouver Public Library (VPL) has been dedicated to meeting the lifelong learning, reading and information needs of Vancouver residents for more than 100 years. Inspired by our vision of being “an informed, engaged, and connected city” and our mission as a “free place for everyone to discover, create and share ideas and information”, VPL is proud of its reputation of being the most-visited major urban library per capita in Canada.

Located in a city often cited as one of the best places in the world to live, Vancouver, with a population of 630,000, includes dynamic and diverse communities in a metropolitan region of 2 million. The next few years promise to be an exciting time for VPL with the 2018 opening of the top two floors of our iconic Central Library and the recent launch of our new strategic plan, VPL 2020, which will guide our services, programs, amenities, and resources.

With over 43,000 square feet of public space, levels 8 and 9 will offer library users a unique suite of service areas including a publicly accessible garden, an auditorium, community rooms and an engaging, interactive learning and exhibit space called Vancouver Stories. Vancouver Stories will be one of the highlights of the Central library. With its innovative exhibits, hands on activities, and thought provoking displays, it will showcase the stories and culture of the Vancouver Community.

The development of the two new floors demonstrates our commitment to continuous improvement, robust public service, and innovation. We are continually evolving our services and asking our users to rethink their old notions of what a library is and imagine what a library could be.

About the opportunity

VPL is seeking a creative, innovative and strategic leader to join its management team on a 2 year contract. As part of a team of enthusiastic Managers and reporting to the Director, Library Experience, the Manager Exhibits and Partnerships will be responsible for turning the vision for Vancouver Stories into an unexpected, engaging, interactive experience for our users. You will envision, plan and curate dynamic, one of a kind exhibits and experiences that command attention and encourage repeat visits. Your goal will be to create an experience that will be one of many highlights for users of VPL. You have the necessary skills and experience to utilize new media to reach new audiences in unexpected ways. Your vision will be achieved by working with VPL staff and through partnerships and license agreements with other agencies.

We are seeking a leader with outstanding communication, inter-personal and facilitation skills. You possess demonstrated ability to envision and create museum quality exhibits and experiences. You will serve as an ambassador of public library service in Vancouver and will work to build strong relationships with the library, archive, museum and gallery communities.

You possess a thorough knowledge of museum and exhibit operations, industry best practices, collegial decision-making and project management skills, and are flexible and adaptable in a changing environment.

Vancouver Public Library offers a competitive and comprehensive salary and benefits package. This is a management position, exempt from the bargaining unit. Additional information and leadership competencies can be found in the job description.

Does this sound like you?

  • Creative, imaginative and innovative
  • Skilled curator of museum quality exhibits
  • Community focused and committed to public service
  • Skilled project manager
  • Experienced manager of a successful team
  • Experienced in staff development and recruiting
  • Creative problem solver
  • Experienced change agent
  • Evidence based decision maker
  • Understanding of cross cultural competencies
  • Strong evaluation and impact assessment skills
  • Committed to the success of the organization as a whole
  • Curious to explore challenges and to find solutions
  • A lover of libraries

We require:

  • A Master’s Degree in Museum Studies or a bachelor’s degree in a related field and significant recent relevant experience
  • Post-secondary courses in management studies
  • Knowledge of the issues, trends and best practices applicable to the museum and cultural fields
  • Five years recent relevant experience, including a minimum of three years experience in a leadership role; demonstrated leadership and managerial skills; demonstrated written and oral communication skills
  • Demonstrated experience curating museum quality exhibit

Note: This is a two year temporary full-time position from 2017 until 2019.

Expressions of interest accompanied by a résumé should be submitted by:

Mail: Human Resources Department

Vancouver Public Library

350 West Georgia Street

Vancouver, BC V6B 6B1

OR Email: careers@vpl.ca

The application review process will begin April 19, 2017. This position will remain open until filled.

Please quote the competition # in the subject line when applying electronically and upload your cover letter and resume / CV as one attachment. Ensure your application has one of the following file extensions: .pdf .doc .rtf .txt

While the Library thanks you in advance, only those candidates being considered will be contacted.

As the Vancouver Public Library is responsible for the well-being of its patrons, a criminal record check is a condition of employment. Personal information collected is used in accordance with the BC Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. VPL values a diverse workforce which represents the vibrant community we so proudly serve. Consider joining our committed team of staff and being part of an innovative, inclusive and rewarding workplace.

Closes: 2 July, 2017

Vancouver Public Library
Vancouver , BC