MOQDOC Call for Submissions

Share your thoughts for the next edition of MOQDOC!

The Winter 2019 issue calls for discussion surrounding the digital exchanges that enable the professional community, their users, and institutions to thrive in the age of digital initiatives. This call for papers is asking: how are libraries, archives’ centers, art centers, museums, and artists’ collectives, as well as other such organizations that are dedicated to the arts by their cultural heritage and visual cultural resources and information services, rising to the challenges of the digital era?

We welcome articles on the following topics, but are not limited to:

  • Virtual exhibition reviews
  • Social media initiatives
  • Profile of an established member or information studies student (preference given to profiles of members participating in the development of digital projects or social media initiatives)
  • Description of research, special projects, or work in progress on digital projects
  • Arts related practicum projects

Submit your 250-1000 words in French or in English. Feel free to consider highlights, problems, lessons learned, and larger implications.

Submit your proposal no later than October 29, 2018 to arlismoq@gmail.com

ARLIS/NA Northwest Chapter 2018 Fall Chapter Meeting in Vancouver, BC – Fast Approaching!

Registration is now open for the joint ARLIS/NW + VRA-PRC 2018 Annual Meeting in Vancouver, BC!

When
Friday, October 12, 2018
Where
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
Ron Burnett Library + Learning Commons
520 E 1st Ave, Vancouver, BC V5T 1A7

 

Preliminary Program
– ARLIS/NA Northwest Chapter and VRA business meetings
– Talk on Allyship with guest speakers
– Emily Carr University Campus exhibitions tour
– Lunch
– Reconciliation workshop
– Optional activities on Saturday

Meeting Registration
Register in advance with the form below and pay via PayPal or in person the day of the meeting (cash/cheque).

Register online

Curator, Books at the Canadian Centre for Architecture

Job identification
Job Title: Curator, Books

Division: Collection

Immediate superior: Associate Director, Collection

Status: Permanent, full time (35hrs/week)

Posting period: April 17 to May 16, 2018

Job entry: June 2018

Job Summary
The key responsibilities of this job are to develop a coherent long term strategy for library acquisitions that relates to the curatorial direction and other Collection acquisitions. The incumbent plans, coordinates and manages all aspects of the acquisition of library collection materials. In doing so, the incumbent collaborates actively with the curatorial, editorial, collection and research divisions, as well as with the bookstore and Collection team.

Key responsibilities
Library acquisitions

  • In collaboration with the curatorial, editorial, collection and research divisions, coordinates, plans, develops and manages all aspects of the acquisition of the library collection, and proposes lines of investigation and acquisition
  • Manages and coordinates in collaboration with the Associate Director, Collection, the international exchange program of publications, in relation to curatorial projects and Collection acquisitions
  • Collaborates closely with the bookstore staff on ordering and on curatorial selections to be presented
  • Actively scouts for new publishers, distributors and vendors
  • Manages and monitors the library acquisition operations and budgets
  • Supervises the Acquisition, Assistant and works closely with the Head, Collection Access to improve access to the Collection
  • Prepares customs documentation and negotiate with brokers and delivery firms
  • Manages the standing order plan, selecting series titles for standing order, setting up standing orders and traces multi-volume sets and series to complete library holdings
  • Deals with donors who wish to donate material, providing or arranging evaluations as required

Collection development strategy

  • Works closely with curatorial, editorial and research staff in discussing their projects and develops a coherent collection development strategy that responds to CCA’s diverse and changing research needs
  • Collaborates with CCA Bookstore staff to maintain currency in recent publications and to exchange information on publications
  • Participates in the testing, evaluation, approval and implementation of new software and upgrades to the Library’s integrated online system

Required qualifications

  • Education: Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) degree from an ALA‑accredited institution and an (under) graduate degree in the history of architecture or art or a related discipline in the humanities
  • Number of years of relevant work experience: 3 to 5 years
  • Excellent knowledge of spoken and written French and English is essential
  • Good understanding of the contemporary debate in architecture
  • Excellent research skills
  • Familiarity with architectural bibliography
  • Facility in handling fragile and precious collection materials
  • Good understanding of electronic publishing and digital developments
  • Good understanding of the out of print book market
  • Good understanding of acquisition databases

Visit the CCA website for full details

Closes: 16 May, 2018

OCAD U Archivist (5 Month Contract)

Position Summary:
Reporting to the Head, Visual Resources & Special Collections, the Archivist supports the university archives by providing archival research, reference, and digitization services within a collaborative service model, and working with the Head on digitization projects and archival research services, to meet the university’s information needs and strategic priorities.

Summary of Responsibilities :

  • Provide services in alignment with Archives policies and procedures to the university, external researchers, and the public
  • Collaborate with Visual Resources & Special Collections staff to provide digital reproduction services in accordance with institutional fair-dealing policies, archival rights management principles, and copyright legislation
  • Support the Head of Visual Resources & Special Collections, and other Library staff in related tasks that contribute to the successful operation of the department

Qualifications:

  • Graduate degree in Archival Studies, Information Management, or Library and Information Studies from an ALA-accredited institution, and a minimum of one (1) year of related experience in an academic library supporting teaching, learning and research
  • Knowledge of historical and contemporary art and design
  • Thorough understanding of principles, methods and techniques for managing archival records
  • Current knowledge of records and document management-related technologies, preservation technologies, in addition to digital imaging and digitization technologies
  • Strong service-orientation and problem-solving skills, including demonstrated creativity and initiative in responding to reference and research requests
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills
  • Exceptional time-management skills, with the ability to manage concurrent projects, while maintaining on-demand reference and research services
  • An advanced understanding of rights management principles and of applying copyright legislation within the context of diverse art and design practices at the university level
  • Demonstrated commitment to the principles of equity and diversity, and proven ability to deal effectively with a diverse
  • Population

Compensation: $37.57 to $49.20 per hour, plus 4% vacation pay and 6% in lieu of benefits.

Hours of Work: Monday to Friday, for a total of 35 hours per week. This contract is expected to begin immediately for five (5) months.

Application Deadline: Interested applicants are invited to submit an updated resume, with a cover letter by selecting “Apply for this Position” below, no later than Friday, April 13, 2018 by 4pm.

Click here for more details

Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity Library Practicum

Program Overview

The Library Practicum program is designed for new library professionals with a background in the arts. This hands-on experience allows individuals an opportunity to work with the Librarian to receive direct mentorship on collection management, cataloging, outreach, public program development, and public service. Candidates will receive a general overview of the activities of the library with introductions to all aspects of the library.

What does the program offer?

This role complements studies in outreach and embedded librarianship and will primarily focus on the Paul D. Fleck Library and Archives‘ collection of artists’ books. Practical experience includes the cataloguing and assessment of items in that collection and the creation of public programs for the library.

Learning opportunities will arise through attendance at lectures, workshops, and events related to arts programming at Banff Centre. Benefits to participants include enhanced practical librarianship skills, as well as opportunities for critical thinking, problem-solving, and learning from an experienced library team. Participants will also have the opportunity to do personal research activities as outlined in their learning objectives and project proposal.

Who should apply?

Practicum placements are appropriate for recent graduates of Master in Library and Information Science programs who also possess a degree or have experience in the arts and an interest in artists’ books, cataloguing, and public program development. This is an opportunity for a new professional to gain experience and expand and develop their careers and capabilities. This program requires a full-time commitment.

See the website for more information! An Archives Practicum position is also available.

Application deadline for both positions is February 14, 2018.

Systems Librarian – Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal, Quebec

Job Identification

Job title: Systems Librarian
Division: Collection
Immediate superior: Head, Collection Access
Status: Permanent, full time (35hrs/week)
Posting period: January 26 to February 18, 2018
Job entry: As soon as possible

Job Summary

The responsibilities of this job are to provide technical expertise, day-to-day administration, and broad support for traditional and emerging software solutions and standards necessary for optimal management and access of the CCA Collection (library, archives, prints & drawings, and photography).

The incumbent will work closely with the IT department, the Web team, Collection staff, and vendor technical support to manage Collection and related systems with a primary focus on the integrated library system (SirsiDynix Horizon). The Systems Librarian is also expected to contribute to activities related to the development and implementation of search tools for the website and to collaborate in the management of the system used for other parts of the Collection, including the archives (Gallery Systems TMS).

For full details, visit the CCA website

2018 ARLIS/NA Ontario Travel Award Deadline Extended!

The deadline for the applications of the 2018 ARLIS/NA Ontario Travel Award to attend “Out of Bounds”, the annual ARLIS/NA conference in New York City, February 25 – March 1, 2018 (originally announced November 11, 2017) has been extended until Sunday, January 21st, 2018.

All are welcome to apply.  Students, new professionals and ARLIS/NA Ontario members are strongly encouraged.

For details and eligibility, please visit the website (note that the date has not yet been updated to reflect the extension) or email arlisna.ontario@gmail.com.

Canadian [Emerging] Librarians Spotlight: An Interview with Marianne Williams

What is the name of the employer/institution you work for?

The University of Arkansas Fayetteville, located on the cusp of the Ozark National Forest in breathtaking northwest Arkansas.

Can you tell us a little bit about your background, your current position, and how you got into the field of art librarianship?

During my undergrad at Carleton University in Canadian Studies and Art History, I worked a bunch of part-time library jobs around campus, including at CKCU FM, the Sexual Diversity Centre and the School for the Study of Art and Culture. I initially got into librarianship because I was interested in activism in GLBTQ+ communities, and did a fellowship at the Lesbian Herstory Archives in Brooklyn after graduation, and then returned to Canada to do my Masters of Information and Museum Studies degrees at the University of Toronto. After I graduated, I got an amazing full-time, year-long practicum at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, which confirmed that art librarianship was the right path for me, since I loved working with artists and collaborating with my peers to do research and other interesting projects. After that year, I became interested in doing library residencies and travelling a bit, so I started looking for jobs that combined my interests in teaching, art and librarianship, and ended up accepting an offer to be the Librarian-in-Residence at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville.

What brought you to your current position?

I wanted the opportunity to teach students and to work at a public research university, and the University of Arkansas offers a great Librarian-in-Residence program designed to be an entry level position into academic librarianship. As the Resident, I get faculty status, but get to design my own rotations in various areas of the libraries system that I’m interested in. Right now, I’m conducting research on diversity and inclusion in the library profession while working in the Reference and Instruction department, where I teach one shot instruction sessions and work on reference requests. In 2018, I will do projects in the Fine Arts Library and in the Special Collections department, followed by a longer research project. The variety and independent structure of the Residency program appealed to me, and I have the collaborative and enthusiastic support of a great faculty, too.

What does a typical day at work look like for you?

I start my day with a quick scan of headlines and current events, I check Twitter and scroll though messages from art and library related listservs. Then I think of ways that I might include those issues and ideas into instruction or other potential projects, like research guides or organizing public panels. Sometimes this gives me ideas about what materials to select for collection development. Currently, I’m doing a lot of research on information literacy and diversity, so I try to read 2-5 articles a day on those topics and take notes, I try to spend at least an hour or so writing. I also serve on a couple of cross-campus committees, and coming up with information literacy resources for some different instructors on campus, so I might spend a couple of hours designing a one-shot session, an assignment or lesson plan for those, attending meetings about those projects, or actually delivering instruction. I also work reference desk and chat shifts and edit and modify Research Guides quite regularly. I don’t necessarily have a typical day, but these are the main components I try to do.

Do you have any advice for current students and/or those on the job market? As an emerging librarian, what are the most important things you think your peers should know?

It’s different for everyone, but finding mentors in and outside of librarianship has been the most helpful and important thing in my emerging professional life, as well as maintaining friendships in all different areas of my life. The more people who care about you who send you job postings, the better. The more people who are willing to look over your CV or proofread your cover letter before you submit it, the better. The more people rooting for you, the better. And always return the favour!

What were/are some challenges for you as a new professional? What do you think are current challenges in the field of art librarianship or librarianship in general, particularly within Canada?

I think one of the biggest challenges in librarianship in general in Canada is needing to move, sometimes across the country, to pursue opportunities. Moving around and being nomadic works well in my life, but it doesn’t appeal to everyone nor is it feasible for those with personal or family commitments. In terms of art librarianship, there are more entry-level opportunities in the United States, and that’s where I have chosen to develop this part of my career, although I hope to return to my homeland one day.

Can you talk a little bit about ways that you draw on the more conventional aspects of your LIS education? And what are some things you’ve had to learn on your own?

I am currently doing a lot of LIS research, so I use my familiarity with LIS journals and databases from my education frequently. The conventional aspect I draw on the most is my relationships to my classmates. I keep tabs on where my colleagues and friends ended up, because they have become my professional peers and colleagues and I get a lot of support from them, and I try to give them support when I can.

I still have a lot to learn on my own! For me, I learned technical tools and software outside of the classroom. For example, MARC cataloguing and LibGuides were things I practiced a bit in school, but ultimately had to learn on my own at a slower pace than what an LIS classroom format could accommodate.

What would you consider the most rewarding parts of your job, and what are your biggest challenges as an information professional currently working in an academic library environment?

My biggest reward and challenge is teaching. Becoming a strong educator and encouraging and developing critical thinking about information in students is incredibly important to me. But, as with anything worth doing, it takes some trial and error before you feel confident doing it well. Right now, I’m still figuring out my teaching style and trying out new ideas of how to engage students. I’m a part of a great team of librarians here at UArk who have shared a lot of insights and techniques with me, they let me shadow their instruction, which is a huge help. Ultimately, instruction is something you need to figure out on your own through experience, and I think I’ll always be looking for ways to improve and get better.

Do you have any insight or advice as to how ArLiSNAP can continue to assist in connecting emerging Canadian and American information professionals?

Participating in the yearlong ARLIS Mentoring program has been a great experience for me, and I’ve managed to connect to both my peers and an awesome mentor, so please continue doing that! I have also really enjoyed Twitter chats, and presenting in the ARLISNAP webinar was a great opportunity to hear about awesome projects across the continent. Basically, anything that gives Jenny Ferretti (@CityThatReads) a forum is fantastic.

Tell us something fun about yourself! What do you do in your spare time? If you could take a trip right now to visit any library in the world, which would it be?

I am really interested in Sandor Katz’ Wild Fermentation, so I’ve been making a lot of kombucha, tepache, sourdough and sauerkraut, so fermentation and baking have become a big part of my life, complete with small parties where I serve said bread and carbonated drinks. That takes up a fair amount of my spare time.

If I could take a trip to any library in the world, I would go to the Lånegarderoben in Stockholm, Sweden. It’s one of the world’s first clothing libraries, and I’ve been following the research and ideas coming out of clothing libraries and sustainable fashion for a couple of years.

ARLIS/NA Conference to be held in Montréal in 2021!

ARLIS/NA Conference in Montréal, Canada in 2021

Original post by Jessica Herbert, ARLIS/NA MOQ, Nov 20, 2017. See full post here

In 2021, we invite you to discover Montréal: one of the largest French speaking cities in the world, a UNESCO city of Design, a festival town, a food lover’s paradise, an art metropolis, a technology hub. The Montréal-Ottawa-Québec (MOQ) chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America proposes to host the 2021 ARLIS/NA conference in Montréal in late March 2021, to allow for milder winter temperatures.

Why Montréal? Over the last decade, the downtown core has benefited from a significant Quartier des spectacles revitalization project, which links together public spaces, the Montréal Museum of Contemporary Art, concert halls, theatres, galleries and restaurants in a dynamic and accessible setting. Art and design are intertwined in the daily life of the city, with hundreds of public artworks. Our proposed timing for the conference would provide a particularly intriguing opportunity to experience art’s role in this city’s civic life, as it would coincide with the annual Art Souterrain festival which features hundreds of public art exhibits in Montréal’s underground city.

For the 2021 conference, we propose a theme centering around the idea of convergence. The city of Montréal itself is a site of convergence, as a place where both French and English are commonly spoken, different languages and cultures come together, and a blend of old and new is manifested in its history, architecture and integration of technologies. This theme also reflects the nature of ARLIS/NA and the MOQ chapter, which are composed of members from a variety of different backgrounds, working in small and large institutions, including public libraries, academic institutions, museums as well as many independent professionals and students. The theme of convergence can be expanded to explore the relationship between professional practice with community and arts organizations like art hives and fablabs. It can also focus on the convergence of new technologies, such as 3D printers, virtual reality, and digital artists’ books and how they have become integrated into the practice of librarianship.

Since the ARLIS/NA conference was last held in Montréal in 1995, with the theme of Art and the Francophone World, the city has continued to evolve, particularly in the arts and cultural sector. We will provide an itinerary that will allow attendees to revisit some historical highlights of the city, while learning about newer initiatives and cultural institutions that have developed over the past twenty years, including organisations with a focus on digital technologies, such as the Société des arts technologiques and the Phi Centre.

 

 

Join us in La belle province in 2021!

 

On behalf of the Montréal-Ottawa-Québec chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America.

ARLIS/NA MOQ Fall Meeting / ARLIS/NA MOQ réunion d’automne

The Montréal-Ottawa-Québec chapter (ARLIS/NA MOQ) is excited to announce our Fall meeting which will be held on Friday, November 24 at the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montréal.

Please see the programme attached.

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Le chapitre Montréal-Ottawa-Québec (ARIS/NA MOQ) est heureux d’annoncer notre réunion d’automne qui aura lieu le 24 novembre au Centre Canadien d’Architecture à Montréal.

Le programme de la journée est ci-joint.

ARLIS-NA MOQ_Rencontre d’automne 2017_CCA