Curator, Books at the Canadian Centre for Architecture

Job identification
Job Title: Curator, Books

Division: Collection

Immediate superior: Associate Director, Collection

Status: Permanent, full time (35hrs/week)

Posting period: April 17 to May 16, 2018

Job entry: June 2018

Job Summary
The key responsibilities of this job are to develop a coherent long term strategy for library acquisitions that relates to the curatorial direction and other Collection acquisitions. The incumbent plans, coordinates and manages all aspects of the acquisition of library collection materials. In doing so, the incumbent collaborates actively with the curatorial, editorial, collection and research divisions, as well as with the bookstore and Collection team.

Key responsibilities
Library acquisitions

  • In collaboration with the curatorial, editorial, collection and research divisions, coordinates, plans, develops and manages all aspects of the acquisition of the library collection, and proposes lines of investigation and acquisition
  • Manages and coordinates in collaboration with the Associate Director, Collection, the international exchange program of publications, in relation to curatorial projects and Collection acquisitions
  • Collaborates closely with the bookstore staff on ordering and on curatorial selections to be presented
  • Actively scouts for new publishers, distributors and vendors
  • Manages and monitors the library acquisition operations and budgets
  • Supervises the Acquisition, Assistant and works closely with the Head, Collection Access to improve access to the Collection
  • Prepares customs documentation and negotiate with brokers and delivery firms
  • Manages the standing order plan, selecting series titles for standing order, setting up standing orders and traces multi-volume sets and series to complete library holdings
  • Deals with donors who wish to donate material, providing or arranging evaluations as required

Collection development strategy

  • Works closely with curatorial, editorial and research staff in discussing their projects and develops a coherent collection development strategy that responds to CCA’s diverse and changing research needs
  • Collaborates with CCA Bookstore staff to maintain currency in recent publications and to exchange information on publications
  • Participates in the testing, evaluation, approval and implementation of new software and upgrades to the Library’s integrated online system

Required qualifications

  • Education: Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) degree from an ALA‑accredited institution and an (under) graduate degree in the history of architecture or art or a related discipline in the humanities
  • Number of years of relevant work experience: 3 to 5 years
  • Excellent knowledge of spoken and written French and English is essential
  • Good understanding of the contemporary debate in architecture
  • Excellent research skills
  • Familiarity with architectural bibliography
  • Facility in handling fragile and precious collection materials
  • Good understanding of electronic publishing and digital developments
  • Good understanding of the out of print book market
  • Good understanding of acquisition databases

Visit the CCA website for full details

Closes: 16 May, 2018

Please welcome your new Social Media Liaison: Larry Eames

Hi Hi! My name Larry Eames (she and he pronouns) and I’m excited to be serving as your social media coordinator!

I’m currently working on my MLIS at the University of Washington iSchool and working at Suzzallo Library as a Graduate Reference Assistant in Government Publications, Maps, Microforms, and Newspapers. You can find me personally on Twitter @liblarrian. I’m excited to get more involved with ArLiSNAP after the 2018 New York ArLiSNA conference and I’m even more excited to connect with all of you!
Before Library School, I received a BA in Religious Studies and an MA in the Humanities focused on Art History and Print Culture. Outside of class, I play D&D and enjoy knitting and listening to podcasts on Seattle’s many rainy days. Right now, I’m hooked on Spirits Podcast, the CBC’s Because News, and Scriptnotes, but I’m always taking recs.

Internship Opportunity: Photo Archive Intern, American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, NYC

Description

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) Archives’ Photo Collection contains over 100,000 images. These photographs offer a rich historical overview of JDC’s relief activities over the past century in 90 countries. More than 73,000 photographs have already been digitally scanned. We seek students for an experiential education opportunity to assist with image cataloguing and preservation. The broad range of countries and topics in our scope of this collection, which encompasses regions and time periods such as postwar Europe, 1950’s North Africa and 1960s-70s Israel, allows us to tailor projects to different interests.

Special projects: • Adding to our online database the following photo collections:
o Community life, education and health services provided to Moroccan Jews from the 1950s-70s o Post-WWII Jewish refugees living in Displaced Persons Camps in Austria and Germany o Youth and elderly care programs in 1960’s Israel. o Assorted collections of JDC activities in Jewish communities of Bulgaria, Hungary, India, and many others • Preparing unprocessed images documenting JDC activities in 20 countries (1940’s-70’s) with emphases on Israel, France, Germany and Iran for digitization and preservation.

Responsibilities

• Creating metadata and integrating new photographs into cataloguing system.

• Conducting online research and fact-checking to enrich descriptive data for photographs.

Qualifications

Proficiency in Word and Excel required. Familiarity with database procedures is recommended. Preferred candidates will have completed at least one semester of graduate work in archival, museum, or library studies, or art history. The ideal candidate will be detail-oriented and have a basic knowledge of photographic history.

Compensation

Unpaid.

Location

New York, NY

To Apply

All opportunities are unpaid, but may be taken for course credit. The expected schedule is 12-20 hours per week. Options are available in the NY office located in midtown Manhattan and our offsite facility in Long Island City.

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. To apply, please send a cover letter and resume to archivesinterns@jdc.org.

Company Information

archives.jdc.org

Collection Strategy Librarian, Art & Art History and Design Emphasis, San Jose State University (Reposted)

Location
San Jose, CA
Open Date
Feb 16, 2018

Description
Subject to Budgetary Approval
University Library

Specialization: Collection Strategy Librarian, Art & Art History and Design Emphasis

Job Opening ID (JOID): 24466

Rank: Senior Assistant Librarian (Tenure-track)

The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library seeks an innovative and creative librarian to provide leadership in the area of collection strategy. Under the direction of the Director of Academic Services, the Collection Strategy Librarian will collaborate with faculty, library staff, and students to provide guidance in the development, management, delivery, assessment, and planning of the library’s digital and print collections. As a faculty member, the candidate participates in the library liaison program and engages in library and university governance and scholarship, which includes research, scholarly, and creative activities required for tenure and promotion. The Collection Strategy Librarian will serve as the liaison to the Departments of Art & Art History and Design.

Responsibilities:

Under the direction of the Director of Academic Services, leads collection development activities including assessment, selection, and deselection of print, non-print, electronic resources, and gifts in all subject areas.
As part of the Academic Services team, develops the collection management, preservation, and deselection strategy.
Coordinates collection development and selection activities of liaison librarians.
Work with relevant stakeholders in developing collection development policies, evaluating print and electronic material purchases, and providing disciplinary collection assessment and statistical analysis and reports.
Establishes and maintains a strong collaborative relationship with all library units that build and maintain digital and physical collections.
Represents and participates in cooperative collection development programs with other libraries and library consortia.
Develops and maintains an awareness of the trends and issues affecting collection management and development.
Builds a record of progressive scholarly and professional achievement to fulfill the University requirement of retention, tenure and promotion.
Participates in the library liaison program, providing services to the departments of Art & Art History and Design.
Candidate must address the needs of a student population of great diversity – in age, cultural background, ethnicity, primary language and academic preparation

Required Qualifications:

Minimum 2 years of experience in selecting library materials
Experience serving as a liaison to academic programs/departments
Master’s degree from an ALA accredited program or equivalent is required at time of appointment.
Knowledge of planning, designing, and implementing innovative practices or tools to improve collection development and maintenance.
Experience with collection analysis and assessment of print and electronic resources.
Familiarity with a collections budget and collection-related projects.
Excellent analytical, interpersonal, time management, organizational and problem-solving skills.
Applicants should demonstrate awareness of and sensitivity to educational goals of a multicultural population as might have been gained in cross-cultural study, training, teaching and other comparable experience

Preferred Qualifications:

Demonstrated ability to apply metrics and other evaluation criteria to support data-driven collection development decisions.
Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively on collection building and management in a rapidly changing information environment.
Experience or coursework with library resources relevant to the research, teaching, and learning of art, art history, or design.
Undergraduate or graduate degree or equivalent training/work experience in art, art history, or design.
Proficiency with an ILS system and analytics.
Proficiency with Excel or other spreadsheet/reporting platforms.

Salary Range: Commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Starting Date: Summer 2018.

Eligibility: Employment is contingent upon proof of eligibility to work in the United States.

Please include Job Opening ID (JOID) on all correspondence.

Application Instructions
Application Procedures: For full consideration, submit: (1) a letter of interest; (2) curriculum vitae; (3) statement of teaching interests/philosophy; (4) research plan; and (5) names of three professional references with contact information by April 6, 2018 via apply.interfolio.com/49032. This position will remain open until filled.

Important: This item will be required of finalists at the time of on-campus visit: (1) Original, sealed, graduate school transcripts. Mailing address: SJSU, King Library; Attention: Evelia Sanchez; One Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95192-0028.

Tracy Elliott, Dean, University Library, invites you to contact us with your questions at (408) 808-2080 or via email at library-jobs@sjsu.edu. Please visit our websites at http://www.sjsu.edu and library.sjsu.edu. For information on faculty retention, tenure and promotion, see the SJSU Academic Senate policies S15-7 & S15-8 at http://www.sjsu.edu/senate/policies/pol_chron/

The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library at San José State University is recognized as an innovative shared facility combining a large academic library (with a collection of over one million items) and a major downtown public library. This facility uses a merged service model to support the lifelong learning needs of academic and public library users. The University Library’s strategic plan is to build a digital library which will “aggressively increase access, creation, and use of digital collections,” and “will creatively utilize innovative technologies to provide the University and the broader community with a 21st century library environment, both physical and digital.”

San José State University is California’s oldest public institution of higher learning. The campus is located on the southern end of San Francisco Bay in downtown San José (Pop. 1,000,000), hub of the world-famous Silicon Valley high-technology research and development center. Many of California’s most popular national, recreational, and cultural attractions are nearby. A member of the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system, San José State University enrolls approximately 35,000 students, a significant percentage of whom are members of ethno-cultural minority groups. The Library – and the University of which it is a part – is committed to increasing the diversity of its faculty so our community can benefit from multiple perspectives.

 

Original posting: https://apply.interfolio.com/49032

OCAD U Archivist (5 Month Contract)

Position Summary:
Reporting to the Head, Visual Resources & Special Collections, the Archivist supports the university archives by providing archival research, reference, and digitization services within a collaborative service model, and working with the Head on digitization projects and archival research services, to meet the university’s information needs and strategic priorities.

Summary of Responsibilities :

  • Provide services in alignment with Archives policies and procedures to the university, external researchers, and the public
  • Collaborate with Visual Resources & Special Collections staff to provide digital reproduction services in accordance with institutional fair-dealing policies, archival rights management principles, and copyright legislation
  • Support the Head of Visual Resources & Special Collections, and other Library staff in related tasks that contribute to the successful operation of the department

Qualifications:

  • Graduate degree in Archival Studies, Information Management, or Library and Information Studies from an ALA-accredited institution, and a minimum of one (1) year of related experience in an academic library supporting teaching, learning and research
  • Knowledge of historical and contemporary art and design
  • Thorough understanding of principles, methods and techniques for managing archival records
  • Current knowledge of records and document management-related technologies, preservation technologies, in addition to digital imaging and digitization technologies
  • Strong service-orientation and problem-solving skills, including demonstrated creativity and initiative in responding to reference and research requests
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills
  • Exceptional time-management skills, with the ability to manage concurrent projects, while maintaining on-demand reference and research services
  • An advanced understanding of rights management principles and of applying copyright legislation within the context of diverse art and design practices at the university level
  • Demonstrated commitment to the principles of equity and diversity, and proven ability to deal effectively with a diverse
  • Population

Compensation: $37.57 to $49.20 per hour, plus 4% vacation pay and 6% in lieu of benefits.

Hours of Work: Monday to Friday, for a total of 35 hours per week. This contract is expected to begin immediately for five (5) months.

Application Deadline: Interested applicants are invited to submit an updated resume, with a cover letter by selecting “Apply for this Position” below, no later than Friday, April 13, 2018 by 4pm.

Click here for more details

A Success Story: An Interview with Jenny Ferretti, Digital Initiatives Librarian at the Maryland Institute College of Art

Can you tell us a little bit about your background, your current position, and how you got into the field of (art) librarianship?

I’m a first-generation American Latina; both of my parents emigrated to the United States from Central America. I never considered librarianship as a career because I didn’t know what librarians did. I had no real connection to the library or librarians. Before becoming a librarian, I had never met a Latinx librarian, which may have contributed to why I didn’t see myself in this profession.

I went to Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) and got my BFA in Photography. If it hadn’t been for MICA, I wouldn’t have gone to college and I probably wouldn’t be a librarian. I was a difficult, underachieving student in middle and high school because I didn’t learn like everyone else, and no one, including myself, had the patience to realize this. If my fine art practice hadn’t been something I wanted to pursue in college, I don’t know what would’ve become of me. MICA led me to a career in librarianship because in order to graduate, the Photography program requires students to complete an internship. I interned at a private, non-profit museum/library and it was there I realized digitizing museum and library collections was a job. After completing the internship, I got a part-time job there and after graduating I stayed there part-time and got a part-time paid internship position at Smithsonian Institution’s Anthropological Archives. I stayed at both part-time jobs for about a year, then pitched a full-time job at the museum/library (complete with budget projections and digitization program plans) and ended up getting it. I stayed there for about five years before applying to Pratt Institute’s School of Information.

At Pratt I concentrated on Digital Humanities (DH), getting as much digital tools experience as possible in the classroom and as much archives-related experience outside the classroom. While in NYC, I worked at a variety of institutions, including Pratt Institute, Columbia University, New York Public Library, and Barnard College. Pratt’s program was exactly what I was looking for. I wanted to be challenged, particularly in the area of technology and user experience work. After moving back to Baltimore in 2014, I worked in the Library & Archives department at Smithsonian Channel archiving their born-digital assets for about a year.

When I saw the opening for my position, Digital Initiatives Librarian, at MICA, I thought this would be the perfect job to engage two areas I absolutely love: tech and art/design. I had no connection to the library when I was an undergraduate student. This would be my opportunity to engage with a student like me when I was in college. I had what it takes to bridge the gap between artist and archivist/librarian. I wanted to share this knowledge and explore the ways in which DH work could be integrated in the fine art/design context.

Tell us something fun about yourself! What do you do in your spare time? If you could take a trip to visit any library in the world, which would it be?
If I had to base my response on my instagram feed, my favorite things are baseball, sneakers, plants, working, music, being Latina, dogs, family and friends, and eating! Some of my favorite things to do are go to the movies, Bike Party, and dancing. I come from a family who likes to have fun, so we’re generally in a celebratory mood!

I’d love to visit the Stony Island Arts Bank, founded by artist Theaster Gates and I’d love to visit libraries or archives in Nicaragua or El Salvador to try to find any records about my family.

What does a typical day at work look like for you?
This is a tough question because I don’t often have ‘typical’ days! One of the best things about my job is that my day-to-day can be unpredictable and varied. I could be doing a research consultation, in a meeting about something web-related (most recently I’ve been involved in researching a MICA-wide DAMS), creating social media posts for Decker Library, doing collection development for the Film and Video Collection or my liaison areas, less often teaching, etc. My team, the Digital Initiatives Unit, is in charge of the digital presence for the library (which includes the website and social media). Between that and being a liaison librarian, those are the things that take up most of my time.

Do you have any advice for current students and/or those on the job market?
My advice always includes do your research. Make a spreadsheet of all the places you’d like to work – I think my list had around 35 institutions – with links to their job opportunities and check them frequently. I would check them several times a week, especially when I was close to graduating. I looked at the job titles and anything else about people who already worked at these institutions. I would also research the institution, staff, and average salaries.

I would also suggest meeting with your advisor, a trusted faculty member, or using your school’s career development center. A career development center might also help with salary negotiations.

Also, keep in mind that your position might shift priorities. My position originally was not supposed to teach at all and I was not supposed to staff the reference desk regularly (granted I only do two hours per week). I was okay with these changes because I wanted to get instruction experience. But that meant that I had to start reading about pedagogy (which I wish I had done a lot more in school).

Finally, I’d say build up your peer network. Find people who will have your back and be honest about applying for jobs, read your resumes/cover letters, etc. Applying for jobs can involve intense, emotional labor. Find your people and support them as you would want to be supported.

What were/are some challenges for you as a librarian? Are these related to larger challenges in art librarianship or the field in general?
On a personal level, balancing my time between being a manager of a unit and liaison librarian has been the most challenging. I’m lucky our library director gives me room to vent, express what I like or dislike, helps me prioritize my time if I’m feeling stressed, etc.

In terms of librarianship as a profession, I think the most challenging has been to have an open, honest dialogue about what librarianship, particularly art librarianship, is and what our values as a profession should be. Lately I’ve been writing and presenting about whiteness and neutrality in librarianship. Coming to terms with the overwhelming whiteness of this profession is the only way we can hope to change the profession’s demographics. As a woman of color, this has been challenging because many people try to derail the discussion because they view it as a personal attack. After being awarded a Library Journal 2018 Movers & Shakers award for my work with the library and archive workers of color group We Here, I know now is the time to have these difficult discussions and rethink/redesign inclusion and equity initiatives.

Job Posting / Archivist / Alabama State Archives / Montgomery AL

The Alabama Department of Archives and History is extending the deadline for applications on the following job announcement to April 20, 2018.

 Position: 30430 Archivist – Collections Archivist

Annual Salary Range:   $33,086.40 – $50,119.20

Deadline for applications: April 20, 2018

Anticipated start date: Early Summer 2018

 The Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH) seeks an entry level archivist to arrange and describe government records and photograph collections held by the ADAH according to local and national best practices. Primary duties include processing and cataloging new acquisitions of government records and photographs, as well as revising legacy finding aids and catalog records, as required by current practices and user needs. The archivist will participate in committees to assist with the creation and implementation of departmental decisions, policies, and procedures and may also contribute to special projects such as exhibits and community outreach. As a member of the Archival Collections Section the Collections Archivist reports to the Section Coordinator.

 While this position is the only one currently approved for appointment, the state accepts applications to the archivist classification on a continuous basis and the ADAH anticipates at least one additional hire to work in the sphere of local and county records management and outreach activities. If you are interested in any archival position with the State of Alabama, we encourage you to submit an application to the Alabama State Personnel Department by April 20, 2018.

 To see the complete job announcement with application instructions, please open the attached job announcement or go to the department’s employment page at the following link:

 http://www.archives.alabama.gov/employ.html

Paid internship at Erie Art Museum

The Erie Art Museum offers one full-time, 12-week paid internship each year to a recent college graduate thanks to the generosity of Michael and Judy Cheteyan. The internship can start in August or September 2018. Cheteyan interns choose a focus of Exhibition Development, Museum Education, or Collections Management. Applications are due by May 1, 2018. The application and more can be found at https://erieartmuseum.org/internships/. Any questions can be directed to Carissa Brandt at edcoordinator@erieartmuseum.org or(814)459-5477.

Media Preservation Librarian, Michigan State University Libraries

Description
Reporting to the Head of Conservation and Preservation and working with staff in the Digital and Multimedia Center, G. Robert Vincent Voice Library, Special Collections and the Wallace Conservation Laboratory, as well as other library units and partners at other institutions, the Media Preservation Librarian will:

  • Plan, develop and provide leadership for a media preservation program for Library digital and analog collections, including the Vincent Voice Library, Rovi Media Collection and other special collections, by reviewing existing library practices and analyzing needs and establishing policies and best practices that promote long-term stewardship and access to audio visual and moving image materials.
  • Identify and work with vendors and complete RFPs for media conversion services; manage the inventory, shipping and quality control process.
  • Review and advise on media acquisitions and collaborate on conservation and survey efforts.
  • Identify and collaborate with technical and accessibility partners within the library, campus and consortial communities.
  • Provide support for the Libraries’ overall preservation program by assisting with environmental monitoring, the integrated pest management program, and the Libraries’ Disaster Response Committee and other preservation activities.

The successful candidate must be broadly focused and adventurous enough to expand or shift their range of responsibilities to meet evolving campus needs, as well as participate approximately quarter-time in a secondary assignment based on the needs of the library and candidate interests and qualifications. Potential secondary assignments could, for example, include work with special collections, metadata services or collection development.

Librarians are appointed as regular faculty in a continuing appointment system and are engaged in professional development and scholarly activities related to their position. Additionally, librarians serve on library and university committees as elected or assigned.

Michigan State University Libraries serve more than 4,900 faculty, 36,000 undergraduates and 11,000 graduate and professional students on a park-like campus of over 5,000 acres. The MSU Libraries have combined holdings of over 6 million volumes with renowned collections in music, film, agriculture, Africana and comic art and cutting-edge services including a makerspace and digital scholarship lab. The Libraries are home to both the Rovi Media Collection, one of the largest publicly accessible media collections in the world, and the G. Robert Vincent Voice Library, a collection of over 40,000 hours of spoken word recordings dating back to 1888. East Lansing is a vibrant community of 50,000 located adjacent to Lansing, the State capital.


RequirementsMinimum Qualifications

Master’s degree in information or library science from a program accredited by the American Library Association. Knowledge of or experience with media and library preservation. Excellent oral and written communication skills; outstanding interpersonal communication skills including the ability to be flexible in a dynamic and changing environment; exceptional commitment to customer service; ability to work enthusiastically and effectively with diverse faculty, students and staff; ability to work collaboratively and independently; ability to prioritize and balance various unit needs; attention to detail; preparation and commitment to engage in scholarly activity consistent with a library faculty appointment; capacity and commitment to engage independently in continuing professional development.

Desired Qualifications

Familiarity with production, archiving or preserving complex digital objects; knowledge of current library preservation best practices for books, paper and photographic collections; knowledge of best practice for cleaning repair, migrating or rehousing audio visual and moving image materials; knowledge of disaster recovery techniques for media; broad understanding of current trends and tools for sustainability, integrity, authenticity and risk assessment; knowledge of standards-based metadata schema such as MODS, METS and PREMIS. File migration and media conversion practice; use of programming languages such as Python; understanding of the grant-writing process, knowledge of accessibility as it relates to media and media preservation.

Original posting: http://careers.msu.edu/cw/en-us/job/498817/librarian-icontinuing

A Success Story: An Interview with Margaret Huang, Digital Archivist at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Can you tell us a little bit about your background, your current position, and how you got into the field of (art) librarianship?
I received an MLIS from the University Pittsburgh in the Archives, Preservation, and Records Management track. I am currently the Digital Archivist at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. I have been interested in working with and around art ever since I got a job in high school in the gift shop of a museum. During undergrad, I was an art history minor and also happened to get a work study position in my college library’s digitization lab. This is when I started to piece together my career path. I considered pursuing a Masters in Museum Studies but ultimately decided that an MLIS could be a more flexible degree.

What does a typical day at work look like for you?
My position recently pivoted to focus on one specific project so my typical work day right now involves a lot of noodling around in XML/JSON and Excel spreadsheets since I am deep into the metadata creation phase of the project. It is broken up by some of my other responsibilities as issues arise, such as maintaining our ArchivesSpace and Preservica instances, developing digital preservation policies and procedures, answering reference questions, participating in discussions surrounding our time-based media art (I am currently the mentor for our NDSR Art resident on our project: Planning for Time-Based Media Artwork Preservation), and whatever else may come up!

Do you have any advice for current students and/or those on the job market?
My advice to current students and/or those on the job market is to hustle. I was juggling freelance jobs, part-time jobs, and volunteering until I finally got a full time permanent library/archives job. Try to get as much hands on experience and technical skills as possible. Apply to as many jobs that interest you as possible, even if you feel unqualified. It never hurts to give it a shot. Meet and talk with people who have the jobs you want to see how they got there. Again and again, I have found that people tend to want to help and give advice. Also, your first job out of school doesn’t have to be your exact dream job but you can use what you learn to build towards it. At the same time, it’s also ok to not settle if you know what you want. I do honestly believe that hard work pays off so keep hustling.

What were/are some challenges for you as a librarian? Are these related to larger challenges in art librarianship or the field in general?
Currently, my biggest work related challenge is copyright issues. There are so many legal complications, risk tolerances, and stakeholders to consider. This is definitely a common challenge in the field, especially when embarking on digital projects and it becomes even more overwhelming if you’re dealing with entire archival collections, like me, that comprise of hundreds of possible copyright holders. Moving forward, I would like to see libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions collectively push Fair Use as far as possible.

My biggest personal challenge is feeling confident in my technical chops aka imposter syndrome. I think this is felt by many people and while I do not know the cure for these feelings, I can at least say: If you feel this way, you are not alone — let’s empower each other!

Tell us something fun about yourself! What do you do in your spare time? If you could take a trip to visit any library in the world, which would it be?
I love to ride my bike, hike, and travel when I can. Recently, I’ve been reading a lot of true crime books. I think I would be most curious to see the personal libraries of people I admire or am intrigued by – for example, what’s on Iggy Pop’s or Amy Goodman’s bookshelves?